Chain slack


12 replies to this topic
  • WRLuisSa

Posted July 29, 2011 - 12:41 AM

#1

Hi,

From the picture below:

http://s1186.photobu...rrent=Chain.jpg


When you measure the chain slack from the seal guard installation bolt, do you measure from the bolt to cavity A or to cavity B (according to the picture)??


Thank you.

  • dgcars

Posted July 29, 2011 - 01:19 AM

#2

With the rear wheel off the ground......3 fingers. Works for me.

  • WRLuisSa

Posted July 29, 2011 - 01:34 AM

#3

People have different finger sizes thus I like to measure the chain slack with a ruler or so, to be more exact (4.8mm according to the manual).
So I would like to know according to the picture where to measure it on the chain.

Thanks

  • dgcars

Posted July 29, 2011 - 02:31 AM

#4

People have different finger sizes thus I like to measure the chain slack with a ruler or so, to be more exact (4.8mm according to the manual).
So I would like to know according to the picture where to measure it on the chain.

Thanks


Yup...not all men were created equal :smirk:

  • zlathim

Posted July 29, 2011 - 05:27 AM

#5

You are getting way too technical dude. The specs for chain slack are really not that exact. I don't really think it matters if you measure to the low spot or to the slightly higher spot on the chain link, because the specs give a 10mm window of acceptable slack. I'm not sure what you are referring to when you say "4.8mm", because my manual says 40mm - 50mm slack.

Posted Image

  • philmooo

Posted July 29, 2011 - 05:44 AM

#6

I think what is being asked is how to measure the chain for its stretch limits. Maybe??? If not then you are being way to precise the chain needs slack so it dosn't bind the suspension during its travel. When check for chain stretch I measure using the pins using a micrometer.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • zlathim

Posted July 29, 2011 - 06:12 AM

#7

I think what is being asked is how to measure the chain for its stretch limits. Maybe??? If not then you are being way to precise the chain needs slack so it dosn't bind the suspension during its travel. When check for chain stretch I measure using the pins using a micrometer.


Im pretty sure he's not asking about stretch limits. mainly because he titled the thread "Chain Slack", but also because he mentions measuring from the seal guard installation bolt.

  • WRLuisSa

Posted July 29, 2011 - 06:23 AM

#8

I have a 2005 WR450 and my manual says:

48 ~ 58 mm (1.9 ~ 2.3 in)


Indeed, I am not asking about the stretch limits, I am asking about the chain slack itself.
Some people like to adjust the chain to the minimum slack so that its not too loose and maybe does not hit the frame and does not make too much noise (chain slapping).
Thus, I would like to know how the measure the chain slack from the bolt to the chain (either from the lower spot or the slightly higher spot of the chain, this is, spot A or B according to the picture)??

I would like to be as precise as possible on the measurement.

Thanks!!

  • dgcars

Posted July 29, 2011 - 06:35 AM

#9

I think what the Guys are saying is this....don't worry whether its 48 or 58. Don't worry whether you measure it at the centre of a link or at the pin. Remember your comment earlier....not everyones fingers are the same? If you set a chain at 48mm, I can guarantee you that if 5 different people measure the same chain, you will get 5 different answers.

  • philmooo

Posted July 29, 2011 - 06:45 AM

#10

Oh, in that case... set the slack so you think its good then compress the suspension and check to make sure it dosn't get too tight during compression

  • zlathim

Posted July 29, 2011 - 07:04 AM

#11

I have a 2005 WR450 and my manual says:

48 ~ 58 mm (1.9 ~ 2.3 in)


Indeed, I am not asking about the stretch limits, I am asking about the chain slack itself.
Some people like to adjust the chain to the minimum slack so that its not too loose and maybe does not hit the frame and does not make too much noise (chain slapping).
Thus, I would like to know how the measure the chain slack from the bolt to the chain (either from the lower spot or the slightly higher spot of the chain, this is, spot A or B according to the picture)??

I would like to be as precise as possible on the measurement.

Thanks!!


In that case, adjust the chain so that it measures 48mm from the bolt to point "B".

Posted Image

You will then have a chain that is adjusted to the bare minimum of the tolerances, and your anal retentive desires will be thusly satisfied. :smirk:

BTW- In order to have your pictures appear in the thread like I have done above, just copy the IMG code from photobucket and paste it into the body of the thread. It is easy to do and saves people from having to make an extra click to view your photo. The IMG code is located in the "Share this photo" dialog box on the right hand side of the screen (in photobucket).

  • grayracer513

Posted July 30, 2011 - 09:18 AM

#12

Since the main concern is in being too tight rather than too loose, take the measurement from the slider bolt to point A above. To really simplify things, make a go/no go gauge like this:

http://www.thumperta...182#post8906182

The factory slack specs are based on having the wheel adjusted to allow at least 1/2" of true chain slack at the tightest point in the suspension travel. They checked that already, and that's how they cam up with those numbers. It's important to take the measurement with the bike off the ground on a stand, so it's repeatable and accurate.

  • Darrell41653

Posted July 30, 2011 - 09:48 AM

#13

I use one of these...

Posted Image

I dont think it matters which point on the chain you use to measure, as long as when you push the chain up, you use the same reference point. And as has been said before. It is better to have it a little loose as tight.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.