Steel oil filters, your opinion please


28 replies to this topic
  • mgrych

Posted July 21, 2011 - 08:54 AM

#1

With the amount i'm going to be changing the oil on my bike would a steel oil filter be smart?

I've heard some people suggesting that they don't filter out the fine particles as a paper filter would, and of course the manufacturers of the steel filters claim the opposite.

Also, there are some other brands out there claiming to have the same specs as the Scotts brand filter. EX. Moose racing, PC racing, Maxima.. Anyone have any solid information on these things?

  • grayracer513

Posted July 21, 2011 - 10:00 AM

#2

I use a Scotts exclusively. My reasons are as follows:

http://www.thumperta...297#post4676297

The other brands are all knock offs of the Scotts, they're made offshore, and they are not, IMO, of the same quality, not only in terms of the mesh used, but the construction of both the element and the end frame/bypass valve assembly. They may all be made by the same one or two suppliers and re-branded (the Moose certainly is). I have seen one or two of them fail in one way or other.

  • mgrych

Posted July 21, 2011 - 12:40 PM

#3

Sounds good, I wish my money wasn't continuously flying out the door for this bike.. Did invest in my safety after last week's crash and bought some gaerne's

  • Steel Panther

Posted July 21, 2011 - 03:02 PM

#4

I picked up a pro filter at my local shop because it was basically the price of 3 paper filters. The quality seems pretty good and so far after two changes it looks like new.

  • yzf1999

Posted July 21, 2011 - 03:16 PM

#5

i got one on ebay that said " outlaw" stainless mess filter....is it a piece of crap??

  • Yamaryder29

Posted July 21, 2011 - 04:22 PM

#6

No, the outlaw racing products are good quality products. They are made by Pitposse.com and really stand behind there products.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 21, 2011 - 07:54 PM

#7

I picked up a pro filter at my local shop because it was basically the price of 3 paper filters. The quality seems pretty good and so far after two changes it looks like new.


No, the outlaw racing products are good quality products. They are made by Pitposse.com and really stand behind there products.


Are the end frames machined from billet stock or stamped? Is the bypass valve a steel ball with a stainless spring, or a stamped plate? Is the seam of the mesh media welded, or just folded? How much media is there in the element? Can you get a replacement seal for it 3 years from now?

I have the same Scotts I bought for my '06 in late '07 when I bought the bike. That makes it just about 4 years old. I had it tested last month. It still stops 100% of all particles larger than 33 microns. When I see a knock off do that, I may change my mind.

  • Yamaryder29

Posted July 22, 2011 - 03:42 AM

#8

I know the Scott's are great filters, but i can reassure you, so are the Outlaw filters. They are billet stock with a steel bypass valve and stainless spring, and the mesh is welded. They are American made and not some pos japaniese or chinese knock-off. I have had my filter for over a year now. It's gone thru a dozen or more oil changes and still look new.

I know you like the good sh*t gray, but I'm the same and will only run on my bikes what I feel is the very best.

  • Yamiryder

Posted July 22, 2011 - 06:46 AM

#9

This may be a stupid question, but how do you clean a reusable oil filter?

  • grayracer513

Posted July 22, 2011 - 07:15 AM

#10

... the Outlaw filters...are billet stock with a steel bypass valve and stainless spring, and the mesh is welded. They are American made and not some pos japaniese or chinese knock-off.

You believe, then, that a U.S. manufacturer can produce a fundamental duplicate of the Scotts for a quarter of the price and make a profit? Too much of a stretch for me.

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  • Mr. Neutron

Posted July 22, 2011 - 10:36 AM

#11

This may be a stupid question, but how do you clean a reusable oil filter?


I've kinda wondered if I'm doing it correctly myself......... :p

I have a homemade parts washing setup, using mineral spirits for the solvent. It has a pump I got from Grainger, rated for solvents..... I run mineral spirits through the INSIDE of my Scotts filter out, as well as I'm able to. Then, I blow it dry with compressed air, again, from the inside out..... My thinking is that our oil flows from the "outside" part of the filter, to the inside. If I force some solvent and air from the inside-to-out, I'm hoping most of the particulates will get removed with the solvent & air....

If our oil flows the opposite of what I'm thinkin' it does, I may well be out to lunch...... :smirk: :(

Jimmie

Edited by Diesel Goober, July 22, 2011 - 12:08 PM.


  • Yamiryder

Posted July 22, 2011 - 11:19 AM

#12

Ive considered getting a reusable filter, but really don't wanna pay $70 for a scotts and if I did, I wasn't sure how you would clean it.

  • tech24

Posted July 22, 2011 - 12:43 PM

#13

Ive considered getting a reusable filter, but really don't wanna pay $70 for a scotts and if I did, I wasn't sure how you would clean it.


The easiest way is to use an can of brake clean or contact cleaner and spray from the inside out and blow it out with compressed air. Any cleaning method needs to be done from inside out. It probly comes with cleaning instructions I don't know since I don't have one but I'd like to get me one here soon.

EDIT:
Ok gray talked me into it. I have been using a knock off that I have had no problems with but the more I think about it that little filter protects a whole lot and if it were to fail the 50 bucks I saved would not seem like a good deal. Anyone one is ordered! You get what you pay for.
BTW the filter I have is glued together......:smirk:

Edited by tech24, July 22, 2011 - 01:04 PM.


  • grayracer513

Posted July 22, 2011 - 02:24 PM

#14

To clean the filter, hold it by the ends so that no solvent can get inside the filter without going through the filtering media, and swish it around in clean solvent (mineral spirits, etc.). Using a parts washer that pumps used solvent around is OK, but DON'T run the solvent through from the inside out unless you have a better oil filter on your wash tank than you have in the bike. The inside is supposed to be the clean side.

After the solvent, spray compressed air through from inside out (again, be sure of your filtration) or use a carb spray.

Some guys will use hot water and soap, which is fine, too. Just keep anything suspicious out of the inside of the filter, and be sure it's dry before reinstalling.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 22, 2011 - 02:28 PM

#15

the filter I have is glued together......:smirk:

Scotts uses and adhesive to bone the element to the end frames. If it's a good adhesive, there's no better way to do that. The seam I mentioned is the one where the two ends of the pleated mesh come together on the side. The cheap ones typically just fold this joint over itself. Scotts welds it, and the joint leaks no larger particles than any other part of the mesh does.

  • tech24

Posted July 22, 2011 - 04:52 PM

#16

Scotts uses and adhesive to bone the element to the end frames. If it's a good adhesive, there's no better way to do that. The seam I mentioned is the one where the two ends of the pleated mesh come together on the side. The cheap ones typically just fold this joint over itself. Scotts welds it, and the joint leaks no larger particles than any other part of the mesh does.


AH I gotcha, thought the adhesive looked pretty good, can't remember the mesh I think its folded and spot welded but I paid 26 bucks for it, some swiss made filter I forget the brand but I think the scotts is cheap insurance.

  • Yamiryder

Posted July 22, 2011 - 06:54 PM

#17

Sounds simpler for me to keep using paper filters

  • highmarker

Posted July 22, 2011 - 07:23 PM

#18

you can also buy scotts directly from the manufacture, K&P, but they hold the line on the price too.

  • Mr. Neutron

Posted July 22, 2011 - 07:45 PM

#19

To clean the filter, hold it by the ends so that no solvent can get inside the filter without going through the filtering media, and swish it around in clean solvent (mineral spirits, etc.). Using a parts washer that pumps used solvent around is OK, but DON'T run the solvent through from the inside out unless you have a better oil filter on your wash tank than you have in the bike. The inside is supposed to be the clean side.

After the solvent, spray compressed air through from inside out (again, be sure of your filtration) or use a carb spray.

Some guys will use hot water and soap, which is fine, too. Just keep anything suspicious out of the inside of the filter, and be sure it's dry before reinstalling.


Hmm, well, I guess I was cleaning it wrong, Yamiryder. Thanks for pointing that one out, Gray.... :smirk: I do have an inline paper filter on the outlet of my hose from my solvent "tank" (it's a 5 gallon bucket with a pump in it; the "wash basin" is an old stainless steel sink....), but I have no idea what it filters down to, as far as microns are concerned......

I'd proably better amend my cleaning process....

Jimmie

  • grayracer513

Posted July 22, 2011 - 07:46 PM

#20

Sounds simpler for me to keep using paper filters

Did you read the link I posted?





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