stripped the oil drain plug.. now what?


28 replies to this topic
  • mgrych

Posted July 16, 2011 - 02:05 PM

#1

Used a torque wrench and all didn't even get anywhere near the required amount before she stripped... So f*cking pissed right now...

What are my options? It's not like thats the oil pan and can be replaced, first oil change ever, brand new bike.. dealership closed 10 min ago aren't even open tomorrow

Anyone else get screwed like this? What did you do?

  • big-air

Posted July 16, 2011 - 02:13 PM

#2

Same thing happened to me on my 09 z400. I brought it to the dealer and they called suzuki, Suzuki went good for it and replaced it for free.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 16, 2011 - 02:23 PM

#3

First mistake, believe it or not, was using the torque wrench. Odds are that the threads were oily, yes? Torque values are given for clean, DRY threads unless specified otherwise, and torquing them while they have oil on them increases the pulling load on the threads by as much 30% or more. Use your own good judgment instead of the torque wrench.

I'm assuming it's the front drain? Install a heli-coil from an auto parts (take the plug with you so they can match it. it's probably an M8x1.25). If they have Time-Serts, use one of those instead.

  • mgrych

Posted July 16, 2011 - 02:24 PM

#4

what horse-shit this is... I know about how careful to be with drain plugs but this is BS.. Still stripped what the Hell is this thing made of butter?

  • delmas

Posted July 16, 2011 - 02:59 PM

#5

time serts are the best

  • steve_97060

Posted July 16, 2011 - 03:54 PM

#6

what horse-shit this is... I know about how careful to be with drain plugs but this is BS.. Still stripped what the Hell is this thing made of butter?


not the bike's fault..

  • mgrych

Posted July 16, 2011 - 04:14 PM

#7

I know i'm not going to convince people that it was the bikes fault.. But anyone else would agree if they felt the amount of pressure used to strip it... I've tightened plastic screws tighter without stripping them, it really was ridiculous

Anyways, so once i drill and tap this thing for a time-sert, should i flush the hole with some oil to get all the shavings?

  • grayracer513

Posted July 16, 2011 - 04:23 PM

#8

Fill the flutes of the drill bit with grease to hold most of the chips. Same when you run the tap into it. Follow each operation by wiping out with a greased cotton swab.

  • mgrych

Posted July 16, 2011 - 04:40 PM

#9

what do you guys do when changing oil to keep the holes clean and free spray with brake clean?

  • William1

Posted July 16, 2011 - 04:45 PM

#10

I tighten knowing the threads will be oiled. Typically, I turn the bolt until the bolt, drain washer and drain all make contact and then about 1/8th~1/4 more of a turn, much like a spark plug.

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  • grayracer513

Posted July 16, 2011 - 05:14 PM

#11

what do you guys do when changing oil to keep the holes clean...?

Clean of what? Oil? Nothing. If the sump drain feels gritty going back in, I remove it and swab out the threads using clean oil.

  • mgrych

Posted July 16, 2011 - 05:16 PM

#12

ok well it didn't feel gritty or dirty or anything abnormal but you said something about the oil creating the problem that i shouldn't use the recommended torque wrench

  • Darrell41653

Posted July 16, 2011 - 05:35 PM

#13

Someone told me a while back to reduce the torque value by 40% when tightening wet bolts. I have decided to just go back to the old elbow torque wrench when it comes to drain bolts. With drain bolts, I have always finger tightened, and then a quarter turn more.
I have a couple torque wrenches that I use. But with wet bolts, I am going to be a little more careful.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 16, 2011 - 05:36 PM

#14

I never use a torque wrench on drain plugs. You should be able to deal with simple stuff like that by feel. A rule of thumb that is usually pretty safe is to go one sixth turn tighter than the point where the bolt seats, but you should be able to feel the thread tension peaking, or any signs of their beginning to yield.

If you hang out in the pits at a big race and watch the team mechanics at work, you won't see a torque wrench used much at all.

  • Darrell41653

Posted July 16, 2011 - 05:39 PM

#15

I never use a torque wrench on drain plugs. You should be able to deal with simple stuff like that by feel. A rule of thumb that is usually pretty safe is to go one sixth turn tighter than the point where the bolt seats, but you should be able to feel the thread tension peaking, or any signs of their beginning to yield.

If you hang out in the pits at a big race and watch the team mechanics at work, you won't see a torque wrench used much at all.


Very interesting....:smirk:

  • moto2000

Posted July 16, 2011 - 07:12 PM

#16

The "tighten 'till it strips, then back it off a quarter" rule doesn't apply here??

  • grayracer513

Posted July 16, 2011 - 08:00 PM

#17

That would be like "shoot and release" hunting.

  • YZPaGuy

Posted July 17, 2011 - 08:54 AM

#18

I stripped mine too. Friday night before a race. My all metric bike now has a 5/8" drain bolt. LOL Thats the only tap I had that was close. I took my time drilling it out, cleaning the drill bit often. Same deal with the tap. Once it was drilled and tapped I use a bent tip awl, like a dental tool and got all the shavings out I could. Ran the bike through the race, 2 hours, and did another oil change. Filter had a bunch of smaill shavings in it. I' going to change the oil again after 4 hours of run time.

  • rr558

Posted July 17, 2011 - 09:30 AM

#19

I never use a torque wrench on drain plugs. You should be able to deal with simple stuff like that by feel. A rule of thumb that is usually pretty safe is to go one sixth turn tighter than the point where the bolt seats, but you should be able to feel the thread tension peaking, or any signs of their beginning to yield.

If you hang out in the pits at a big race and watch the team mechanics at work, you won't see a torque wrench used much at all.


I've almost never use a torque wrench on anything outside the engine. I've had the forks off enough times I pretty much know what 14lbs. is. lol

  • rcmxracing

Posted July 18, 2011 - 07:41 AM

#20

Should always use new crush washers. Might be able to pick up a huge quantity of them at places like harbour freight for very little money. I stripped mine on an '08 and the heli coil was great, heard the time-serts are better. A local mechanic said he could send his kids to college for how many he has fixed and his recommendation was to use new crush washers every time.





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