2011 YZ450F Break-in ?


41 replies to this topic
  • grayracer513

Posted July 13, 2011 - 07:44 AM

#21

mobil 1 4T after every ride,new filter every other..i know its a little over kill but its only money..

With that oil, that really is unnecessary, unless your "rides" are 3 or 4 hours of actual run time. Even then, you could go twice that.

  • Gunner354

Posted July 13, 2011 - 09:10 AM

#22

Gray,
Which full synthetic doesn't meet your criteria?

  • grayracer513

Posted July 13, 2011 - 11:39 AM

#23

Rotella, off the top of my head, is one example. The deal breaker in most cases actually has very little to do with most of the advantages that synthetics offer. The biggest problem faced by an oil in the YZF or other machines with engine oil being shared by the gearbox is the matter of whether the oil is blended with transmission grade viscosity index improvers or not. These are considerably more expensive, so they are used by very few automotive/commercial oils, and until recently, not even half of the so-called motorcycle oils used them. Now, it seems that the blenders are catching onto this, and about half the premium motorcycle blends will pass 4 cycles of the ASTM D-6278 shear test and stay at their listed viscosity. Too many still won't.

In the real world, what that means is that far too many really good engine oils go from, say, 10w-40 to 10w-25 in only a couple of hours' run time, long before any of the other strengths of the oil have a chance to matter. Without lab tests to go by, the next thing is to pull a used sample of whatever oil you think you like and send it off for an analysis. When it comes back, look at the measured vs. "should be" viscosity at 200 degrees ℉.

  • YamaLink

Posted July 13, 2011 - 01:02 PM

#24

That's impressive. 105.2 hours and the valves are still good to go?

Your ok. I went 5 hours on my engine oil during break in on my crf250r. My engine now has 105.2 hours and has not had any problems.



  • Pmason718

Posted July 13, 2011 - 05:40 PM

#25

Ok Gray I'm going to take your recommendation and go with the AMSOIL but I have 3 questions

1. Where are you guys finding AMSOIL locally? I did put in my zip on there site and saw a few stores but never heard of any of them. If not locally what site on the web?

2. If I go full synthetic is it true that you have to keep using synthetic?

3. Should I go with the stock filter or purchase an AMSOIL filter? I don't race. Right now I'm using the bike to get back into the sport, I probably ride once a month right now

  • grayracer513

Posted July 13, 2011 - 07:05 PM

#26

  • I have always bought Amsoil as a preferred customer directly from their online store at http://www.amsoil.com/. However, with their recent price increases, buying Mobil 1 locally is usually at least as good a deal on an equivalent product.
  • No. That a myth. Or bullshit, if you prefer.
  • I don't think Amsoil sells a filter for the YZ450. My recommendation is a genuine Scotts stainless mesh filter. You'll only ever need one. http://www.thumperta...297#post4676297


  • ttr250dude

Posted July 13, 2011 - 07:13 PM

#27

Does your local dealer not sell Amsoil? I would recommend draining your float bowl if you plan on letting the bike sit for more than a few weeks. I drain mine after every ride.

  • Pmason718

Posted July 14, 2011 - 07:47 AM

#28

  • I have always bought Amsoil as a preferred customer directly from their online store at http://www.amsoil.com/. However, with their recent price increases, buying Mobil 1 locally is usually at least as good a deal on an equivalent product.
  • No. That a myth. Or bullshit, if you prefer.
  • I don't think Amsoil sells a filter for the YZ450. My recommendation is a genuine Scotts stainless mesh filter. You'll only ever need one. http://www.thumperta...297#post4676297


Ok but until I can order the Scotts, the OEM filter should be ok?

Does your local dealer not sell Amsoil? I would recommend draining your float bowl if you plan on letting the bike sit for more than a few weeks. I drain mine after every ride.


Float bowl. Isn't that on carburetor bikes?

  • grayracer513

Posted July 14, 2011 - 08:14 AM

#29

Ok but until I can order the Scotts, the OEM filter should be ok?

Why wouldn't it be?

Float bowl. Isn't that on carburetor bikes?

:smirk: Ooops! :p Gotta love it.

  • Pmason718

Posted July 14, 2011 - 09:00 AM

#30

Gray thanks a lot for the schooling. I can't find AMSOIL locally so I'm going to change the oil with Yamalube 10w-40 so I can ride this weekend but will be ordering some from there website today along with a Scott's filter.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • tech24

Posted July 14, 2011 - 10:06 AM

#31

Gray thanks a lot for the schooling. I can't find AMSOIL locally so I'm going to change the oil with Yamalube 10w-40 so I can ride this weekend but will be ordering some from there website today along with a Scott's filter.


If you can afford it buy a case, who knows when price will go up again, then you'll be set for about 100hrs worth of service.

  • Pmason718

Posted July 14, 2011 - 04:13 PM

#32

HELP


just changed the oil and the oil glass is full is this correct? I thought it should be have way. When I change the oil there was no oil showing in the glass until I started the bike and now the glass is full and I only used 1qt of oil not 1.06 if this matters


EDIT

I see the screw on the left side of the bike that needs to be removed it you go over the glass line, let me try it

  • Pmason718

Posted July 14, 2011 - 04:47 PM

#33

Never mind i got, i just panic a lil, lol

  • TripleUp

Posted July 14, 2011 - 08:33 PM

#34

Ya its weird how that site glass works. It's always completely full when the bike runs but I've always changed the oil as directed by the manual and nothing ever comes out when I take out the oil overflow bolt so I must be doing it properly. It's only supposed to show half full in the site glass like 1-3 minutes after u turn off the bike. I don't really see how this is a very accurate way of checking the oil level.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 14, 2011 - 08:40 PM

#35

I don't really see how this is a very accurate way of checking the oil level.

That's because you don't understand how the system works.

  • tech24

Posted July 15, 2011 - 04:46 AM

#36

HELP


just changed the oil and the oil glass is full is this correct? I thought it should be have way. When I change the oil there was no oil showing in the glass until I started the bike and now the glass is full and I only used 1qt of oil not 1.06 if this matters


EDIT

I see the screw on the left side of the bike that needs to be removed it you go over the glass line, let me try it


Just put a qt in it and let it eat, its always full right after shut down, I only ever use 1 qt.

  • TripleUp

Posted July 15, 2011 - 05:57 AM

#37

That's because you don't understand how the system works.


Well you sure are helpful. Thanks for clearing up all of the confusion for us Gray.:smirk:

  • THE-OG-694

Posted July 15, 2011 - 06:20 AM

#38

With that oil, that really is unnecessary, unless your "rides" are 3 or 4 hours of actual run time. Even then, you could go twice that.


nope..i hit the track so at most ill put 30 to 45 min a day about 2 or 3 times a month..

  • grayracer513

Posted July 15, 2011 - 07:21 AM

#39

Well you sure are helpful. Thanks for clearing up all of the confusion for us Gray.:smirk:

Do I detect sarcasm? :p

First, you need to understand that it's a dry sump oiling system. With the more common wet sump, oil is carried in an area below the crankcase, pumped up from there to wherever it needs to be, and then drains back to the sump to start over. When you fill the oil in most bikes, you put it into the place where it actually is stored during operation.

With a wet sump, there's an oil "tank" or reservoir that is removed from the crankcase itself. Traditionally, this was a separate external oil tank. During the '70's, it became common to see oil carried in a portion of the frame tubing in order to ditch the tank. The Gen2 and Gen3 (yours) YZ450's carry this farther by moving the oil tank to a separated compartment of the crankcase assembly, in front of and apart from the actual crankcase.

Oil is drawn from the tank, pumped to the lube points, and then drains back to the sump, same as a wet sump. But there, it is picked up by a second oil pump that has a higher delivery volume and pumped back to the tank, keeping the sump "dry".

When you do your oil change, you have to drain the main oil supply (front drain), and the residual oil from the sump (rear drain). There's usually about 1-200cc in there, but there could be more if the bike sits a long time, since oil will leak past the feed oil pump and move from the tank to the sump. When you refill, you are putting the entire liter (if you change the filter) into the sump, and nothing into the tank. When you start the engine, the return pump moves as much oil as it can suck up into the tank where it actually belongs. Once you shut it down and let things settle for a minute, the sight glass shows you the actual oil level in the tank, just as if you took a cap off and looked into it. There's nothing more accurate than that.

If you get a different than normal or expected oil level, it's usually because it wasn't properly drained. The oil level is what you see. The only thing that could change that is some condition that would prevent the return pump from staying ahead of the feed, allowing oil to build up in the sump and lowering the level in the tank. In that situation, you could have a full load of oil IN the engine, but not enough in the tank to feed the engine.

The reason it looks fuller while it's running is because the return oil passage exits into the tank almost directly above the sight glass, so it pours oil across the glass as it runs. Oil level must be checked at least 30 seconds, but not more than about 5 minutes after the engine has been run for a minute or two, then shut down.

  • ttr250dude

Posted July 15, 2011 - 05:37 PM

#40

Rotella, off the top of my head, is one example. The deal breaker in most cases actually has very little to do with most of the advantages that synthetics offer. The biggest problem faced by an oil in the YZF or other machines with engine oil being shared by the gearbox is the matter of whether the oil is blended with transmission grade viscosity index improvers or not. These are considerably more expensive, so they are used by very few automotive/commercial oils, and until recently, not even half of the so-called motorcycle oils used them. Now, it seems that the blenders are catching onto this, and about half the premium motorcycle blends will pass 4 cycles of the ASTM D-6278 shear test and stay at their listed viscosity. Too many still won't.

In the real world, what that means is that far too many really good engine oils go from, say, 10w-40 to 10w-25 in only a couple of hours' run time, long before any of the other strengths of the oil have a chance to matter. Without lab tests to go by, the next thing is to pull a used sample of whatever oil you think you like and send it off for an analysis. When it comes back, look at the measured vs. "should be" viscosity at 200 degrees ℉.


These may be stupid questions, i think i know the answer but im only 50% sure.

1) Does every motorcycle specific oil have transmission grade viscosity index improvers? More specifically Honda motorcycle mineral oil.

2) Can you shed some light on oil that is used in seperate dirt bike trannys? Oil change intervals? How long it will hold its viscocity? Can you use 20w-50 or is it better to use true 80w-85 tranny oil that is dirt bike specific?

3) I know synthetic oils are better, but what actually makes them better? Better lubrication? Holds its viscosity longer?

Please excuse my stupidity.. Thank you for sharing your knowledge with all of us. I really appreciate it :smirk:





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