1994 XR250L Carb Questions


9 replies to this topic
  • chetwynd

Posted July 04, 2011 - 06:24 PM

#1

Hi guys,

Sorry for the separate thread but I didn't want to bury my carb questions in my chain problem thread.

So, bought a 1994 XR250L, kick start. Aye yie yie. Ok, so, seems to start pretty easily when it's cold, but when it's hot it's sometimes impossible to start. And, miles back into the forest in the heat, kicking over and over again is a nightmare, as you know. :thumbsup:

One issue is that I basically ride in two locations...sea level, and like 5000 feet. Not a whole lot of in between in terms of elevations. Part of my problem, I would imagine, is that the carb settings or jets or whatever aren't universal for both elevations.

I've done some research and it seems like the Edelbrock carb that everyone is always talking about is a good option, but does it even fit a 1994 XR250L? Is there anything about the Edelbrock carb that won't work on my bike...even if it's not specifically designed for it? I read that they're all basically the same?

What seems appealing about the Edelbrock carb is that there are no jets to change, just some kind of screw. Anyone know about this carb on a '94 XR250L?

I don't really want to sink more and more money into this bike because it's not exactly new, but it doesn't have THAT many miles on it so it seems like it has some life. It definitely had some throttle issues when I was out in the forest, cutting out and so on. Could really be anything, I know. Bad gas (I didn't drain the tank before going out), carb jetting, whatever.

Should I just try to take the carb apart myself? Is changing the jets relatively easy? Carbs have always intimidated me, big time. I feel like I'm going to open it up and springs are going to fly out everywhere and I'd be screwed.

Money is an issue, but not so much of an issue that if there was a nice Edelbrock carb or something that would bolt right up and be good to go, I'd rather spend the money and not find myself with a million carb screws and springs and not know up from down.

Thoughts? THANK YOU ONCE AGAIN! :ride:

  • Trailryder42

Posted July 05, 2011 - 08:18 AM

#2

Should I just try to take the carb apart myself? Is changing the jets relatively easy? Carbs have always intimidated me, big time. I feel like I'm going to open it up and springs are going to fly out everywhere and I'd be screwed.

I'd rather spend the money and not find myself with a million carb screws and springs and not know up from down.

Thoughts? THANK YOU ONCE AGAIN! :thumbsup:


These carbs are simple. Basically, only 3 moving parts, the float, the fuel inlet needle attached to it, and the slide. You take the float bowl off and the jets are right there. The main is one in the center and the pilot is the one offset to the side.

You're not doing yourself any good by shying away from learning how to work on and tune your current carb, only to swap it out for something else you know nothing about how to work on or tune.

You're obviously not intimidated by using a computer, with all of it's complexities, so no need to be with working on your carb.

You need to make sure the valve clearances are in spec. I know, you're probably intimidated by doing that too, but it's really a pretty easy job. It's like anything else you do, just need to grasp the concept of what to do before diving into it.

If you don't have one already, find yourself a shop manual.

I would jet/tune your engine for near sea level. Then at 5k, power might not be as crisp but it will run ok. Just lean out the fuel screw a little at elevation to compensate. That will help with starting and low throttle setting response up there. Then set it back to where it was when you go back to sea level. Record/remember the best fuel screw setting for each elevation.

  • chetwynd

Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:18 AM

#3

Hey thanks for the reply, much appreciated.

I agree, I just need to buckle down and do it, figure it all out. I bought the shop manual, it should arrive in a few days. Is there a simple rebuild kit out there that I should pick up?

"Just lean out the fuel screw a little at elevation to compensate." - is that something that is on the outside of the carb that I can easily adjust without pulling the carb apart?

  • Trailryder42

Posted July 05, 2011 - 01:52 PM

#4

"Just lean out the fuel screw a little at elevation to compensate." - is that something that is on the outside of the carb that I can easily adjust without pulling the carb apart?


Yes. It's at the front of the float bowl. Most likely a brass screw pointing down. See, there's another problem you have. Don't know what the fuel screw is, where it is or what it does. You're just riding the bike the way it is, no wonder it's running like crap on you. You've got some reading to do.

  • chetwynd

Posted July 05, 2011 - 02:18 PM

#5

I don't disagree with you on that one. I'm somewhat mechanically inclined, but it's more of a time issue. I don't have a ton of free time and I really only ride like 300 miles a year if that, so it's just hard to buckle down and REALLY learn the bikes inside and out. But, you're right, I don't know as much as I should and I'm really just a casual rider, but I do appreciate the help. Learning it on my own from scratch is tough, which is why these forums are so helpful. What you tell me in 2 sentences would take forever to figure out on my own.

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  • BondFF05

Posted July 05, 2011 - 05:26 PM

#6

Good call on picking up the shop manual. A Clymer will do the trick but try to get your hands on a Honda service manual if you can. They're a life-saver.

Once your manual arrives you'll see how simple it really is to take apart a carb and dig into the main jets, pilot jet, float valves, etc.

If the jets are plugged up, try boiling them in water and then blowing them out with some compressed air. It usually does the trick! Also make sure you clean everything else on the carb while you have it off the bike. Your manual should also give you some specs when it comes to the idle control and the fuel/air mixture screws.

I'm not sure if your 94 has a fuel filter or not, but if it doesn't, there is usually a fuel screen below the petcock (right under the gas tank). That screen can get plugged up easily if it's not taken care of. Just pop off the cap under the petcock and check it out.

Good luck!

  • 2MANYTOY

Posted July 14, 2011 - 12:25 PM

#7

I have '94 also. It has an aftermarket disc type muffler (I forgot the brand at this moment) that the previous owner installed and rejetted the carb. What jets are currently in it I don't know. It does seem to take quite a while to warm up even with the choke. I have heard that is typical. It also seems to have better throttle responce while on the road with the choke knob partially pulled out. if you push the choke knob all in, it has a slight hesitation. I checked the sparkplug and the color seems ok, a light tan color. Should I rejet the carb even though the plug looks ok? Thanks.

  • runmikeyrun

Posted July 14, 2011 - 05:13 PM

#8

I have a 94 250L. Its hard to start hot as well, especially after dumping it in the woods. I find that holding the throttle wide open and kicking hard a few times will usually get it started. That's assuming everything else on the bike is in good working order. Check to make sure your auto decomp cable isn't broken... mine is and it adds to the aggravation when you're hot and tired in the woods and have to keep kicking and kicking and kicking...

Adjusting the valves is easy, I just asked for help on in the other day and got a good write up on it, its in this section. If they're way out it will def make it hard to start. Check that fuel screen and change the gas!

The slight hesitation can be normal, especially if you crack the throttle open hard suddenly. Search for the carb spring mod, it can help a good amount with that. You can also SLIGHTLY bend the tab that actuates the pumper rod to close the gap between it and the rod. Don't go too much though.

My bike came with an FMF disc muffler on it as well. Supposedly was re-jetted. If your plug looks ok and there's no popping on deceleration with the throttle closed you should be in the ballpark.

  • JohanChaves

Posted July 15, 2011 - 05:24 AM

#9

"Just lean out the fuel screw a little at elevation to compensate." - is that something that is on the outside of the carb that I can easily adjust without pulling the carb apart?


yes and not!!!:smirk: the pilot fuel screw is at the font bottom of your carb, but on the 250L it has a stopper piece so it can not be adjusted unless the bowl is removed so the stopper can be moved out too then you can adjust, or unless the be fore owner removed it already, does it look like just a simple screw to you???

  • ramz

Posted July 15, 2011 - 06:08 AM

#10

Here are some threads about the XR250L carb:

Xr250L Carb Mod That Really Works
http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=281621

Honda XR250L Jet Part Numbers
http://scandalon.com...t-part-numbers/

Also see:

XR250L Project
http://rickramsey.net/XR250L.htm

Click here for the pdf:
http://rickramsey.ne...250Lproject.pdf

And XR250R MAR Mods (many apply to the XR250L as well):
http://rickramsey.net/XR250R.htm

The CRF230F carb is almost identical to an XRR and, except for jets, also the XRL:
CRF230F Carb notes





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