Ti parts


15 replies to this topic
  • jgwakeup

Posted July 02, 2011 - 09:11 PM

#1

Does anyone know who or where you can buy Ti axles and bolts kits for 10-11 yzf450 etc.. Very interested in making bikes lighter and I swore a guy in here said he did it and dropped 10lbs or so. Thanks

  • grayracer513

Posted July 02, 2011 - 10:24 PM

#2

In order for that to be true, since Ti is a little over half as heavy as steel, you would have to believe that there is more than 20 pounds of steel bolts, including the axles and pivot, on a YZ450.

  • RiderX

Posted July 03, 2011 - 07:19 AM

#3

Yeah, there's no way you're going to lose 10 lbs going to Ti axles. There may be a 10 lb loss in a high dollar wheelset and the Ti axles together.

  • KJ790

Posted July 03, 2011 - 07:39 AM

#4

Yeah, there's no way you're going to lose 10 lbs going to Ti axles. There may be a 10 lb loss in a high dollar wheelset and the Ti axles together.


I wouldn't say so, Talon "Ultralight" wheels are almost 2lbs heavier than stock Yamaha wheels. You can shave a couple pounds off with titanium bolts, axles, and swingarm pivot, but not 10 pounds. Also expect to pay a pretty penny.

Eko racing is selling cheap titanium parts for YZ's on ebay: http://motors.shop.e...sid=p4340.l2562

Even then you are talking $300 for the axles and the swingarm pivot. However that is almost $800 less that Mettec sells those parts for.

  • RiderX

Posted July 03, 2011 - 12:13 PM

#5

I wouldn't say so, Talon "Ultralight" wheels are almost 2lbs heavier than stock Yamaha wheels.



Talon claims these wheels don't add any weight on their website, but I know how that goes. I'm shocked to learn the Talon wheels aren't lighter than stock. I guess the added material to strengthen the wheel components cancels the weight saving from the better material used. I wonder if any of the factory teams are using Ti hubs, and how much weight difference it makes.

  • rjcook450

Posted July 03, 2011 - 12:32 PM

#6

I think some are using carbon fiber hubs.

http://www.vitalmx.c...uminum-Hubs,594

  • jgwakeup

Posted July 03, 2011 - 07:44 PM

#7

Hey all... I was only asking about where to buy parts at because I wanted to find out weight differences to see if it would be worth the money and hassle. A guy stated on here in one of these threads about doing axles and pivot n was close to 10 or 12 lbs, so I was interested in finding out one if it was true and where I could buy them at..

So thanks for info and help. Guess I have to track Down where I read that at. I think 300$ might be better the buying a Honda at this point but still up in the air.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 03, 2011 - 08:50 PM

#8

Pull your axles and weigh them. Then multiply the weight by 0.576. The difference is the weight you'll save. Ask yourself if that's worth $300+

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  • KJ790

Posted July 04, 2011 - 06:52 AM

#9

I think some are using carbon fiber hubs.

http://www.vitalmx.c...uminum-Hubs,594


They are only carbon fiber in the center where the hub is the thinnest to begin with. The difference in weight from this is tiny. The weight of Talon wheels comes from their unusual lacing pattern, which uses longer spokes than stock wheels. I weighed my old Talon wheels and my stock wheels on my scale and the Talon wheels were almost 2 lbs heavier.

  • wes513v

Posted July 04, 2011 - 07:07 AM

#10

To go with a full Ti kit it will run you well over a grand for al the bolts and such. Just lose 10 pounds through diet, it's cheaper...

You could search for other aleternatives though, and put it in the right places. Lighter tires for example, less unsprung weight. Use a 110 rear tire instead of a 120. Search for which tires and tubes are lightest. Check out seats. I was reading an article on Andrew Shorts KTM and it appears that they use an aftermarket seat that is lighter. Avoid billet parts and use the stock magnesium clutch and ignition covers. Aluminum screws on non essential areas like plastics, lots of alternatives.

  • KJ790

Posted July 04, 2011 - 09:42 AM

#11

To go with a full Ti kit it will run you well over a grand for al the bolts and such. Just lose 10 pounds through diet, it's cheaper...

You could search for other aleternatives though, and put it in the right places. Lighter tires for example, less unsprung weight. Use a 110 rear tire instead of a 120. Search for which tires and tubes are lightest. Check out seats. I was reading an article on Andrew Shorts KTM and it appears that they use an aftermarket seat that is lighter. Avoid billet parts and use the stock magnesium clutch and ignition covers. Aluminum screws on non essential areas like plastics, lots of alternatives.


+1 There are a lot of steel fasteners on non-load bearing parts. Swap out the bolts that don't hold any load (like shroud and fender bolts) for aluminum fasteners and you can shave off a small amount of weight set high on the chassis.

  • RiderX

Posted July 04, 2011 - 12:06 PM

#12

I find it hard to believe any of these minimal weight savings can be felt.

My last bike was an 08 KTM 2 stroke with E start. I removed the E start, and the voltage regulator and harness, which took off nearly 8 lbs. Then I replaced the silencer with a Ti shorty. This saved another 4 or 5 lbs. I really couldn't feel the difference. Saving a few hundred grams by spending a bunch of cash on Ti bolts just seems like a waste. I think it's more of a placebo effect for most. Maybe it can be felt by a rider with a much higher skill level than mine, or in MX riding (I ride XC).:thumbsup:

  • lowmass

Posted July 04, 2011 - 12:54 PM

#13

Your focus is off. Just ride the bike. You will be much much happyer

  • jhorning81

Posted July 04, 2011 - 03:05 PM

#14

Agree with the above - Consider items which offer other performance gains in addition to weight loss such as a Titanium Exhaust System or Titanium Shock Spring (Get most bang for your buck)

Also fuel load is something to consider - Undertstand your bikes fuel consumption and run minimum fuel level (Gas = about 7lbs/Gal)

  • grayracer513

Posted July 04, 2011 - 05:43 PM

#15

... Titanium Shock Spring ...

Consider that for around $300 you can buy a set of axles of questionable strength that together may save a pound and a half or a top quality KYB shock spring that actually will save 3 pounds.

I'm reminded of the '72 CZ that I had that weighed 245 in stock trim that I took down to 221 pounds. But it was easier then, when you could save 6 pounds by switching from the 9 pound steel tank to a 3 pound fiberglass one, drop another pound and a half by using a good set of chrome moly handlebars, replace the steel rear fender with plastic, stuff like that. Not so easy anymore. Competition among the top manufacturers is so fierce that there just really isn't a lot of cheap pork on the bikes any more.

  • lowmass

Posted July 04, 2011 - 06:33 PM

#16

biggest bang for the buck is lighter tires and tubes. There is almost 2 pounds diff between the better tires and about a lb from regular tube to HD tubes. This is weight at the ends of suspension AND its rotating. These are the two worst areas.

Much of the time the pros have to run HD tubes to avoid flats. They spend thousands on exotic pts to reduce the weight they added in the tube.

Its a waist of money and time for the rest of us





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