Hauling a dirt bike with a car???


34 replies to this topic
  • 400exrider103

Posted July 02, 2011 - 03:52 PM

#1

Alright, I drive a little 2 door Chevy cavalier. Has a little 2.2 4 cylinder in it.. I'm looking for a way to haul my bike around, im not worried about hauling anymore then my one bike, its an 05 yz 125. Not very heavy.. Those "mxhaulers" are out, to much weight for my car. Now I'm thinking about getting a single dirt bike trailer? Do they even make them? I'm not sure what to look for because I have no idea what they would be called :thumbsup: Can anyone help me out? How do you haul your bike with your car? any info appreciated..

  • brandon19

Posted July 02, 2011 - 03:54 PM

#2

you could get a single snowmobile trailer and throw a chock on it

  • jar944

Posted July 02, 2011 - 04:08 PM

#3

I tow 2 bikes on 4x7 trailer (from tractor supply) with my g35

  • fxc3700

Posted July 02, 2011 - 04:09 PM

#4

I use a 4x6 trailer for my bike. It works great. It's light, compact, and well balanced with the bike loaded on it. I can even fit another bike on it too. I've towed it with a VW jetta, honda civic, a volvo 240, and now my honda fit. It was/is no problem with any of the vehicles.

  • mpowyo

Posted July 02, 2011 - 05:35 PM

#5

Yea they make universal towing set ups for them but are kindof a pain to install. Not hard just a pain but if you keep it light most any car can handle it.

  • knudsen

Posted July 02, 2011 - 07:15 PM

#6

Get the lightest wood bed trailer your bike will fit onto and a ramp. Consider a $40 tranny cooler if it's an auto-magic tranny. You only need 10-15% of the load to be on the tongue. So, if it weighs 200#, you need about 20 to 30# on the tongue. Set the bike on it, so the tough weighs in at about 30#. To figure out what the car can handle, look up the specs in the owners manual (RTFM). I doubt you would have trouble, but you need to know:

GTW - Gross Trailer Weight, the weight of the fully loaded trailer. Add the trailers weight, which should be stamped on it and in the manual for it, to the bike weight. Or take the trailer to a scale Grain elevator or scrap yard, usually free.

Curb Weight (Wet) - What you car weighs with gas and oil and nothing in it.

GVWR - Gross Vehicle Weight Rating - This has to come from the manual. It's the maximum weight the car + trailer + all that's loaded on both can handle. You must not exceed this or you'll have trouble stopping. Once you know GTW and curb weight, add them together, and add the weight of anything you will bring, including yourself and passengers. You could weigh it as well, as long as you can get to a scale driving slowly and carefully. Better at least estimate it first.

Maximum tongue weight, whichever is less, the hitch or vehicle. Unlikely to be exceeded in this case, unless you get a heavy trailer, and/or load it wrong.

You should also look for maximum towed weight, if they list it for the vehicle. If this is exceeded, the trailer steers the car... not fun!

How I secure a bike, YMMV: After it's in the proper position, I use 3" drywall screws and screw a 2 x 4 along each side of the front tire to keep it from steering and possible loosening straps. Then I screw down a 2 x 4 in front of and one behind a tire, preferable rear. I skip the front one if it's up against the front of the trailer. You can nail them down, but I remove them for other uses of the trailer.

Get good US made ratchet straps, two inch wide, over-rated, like 10K#. They're like $10 ea., but if they get some nicks along the way, they'll still be good. I think mine are Allied. No Chinese junk. The ratchets bend up before you get them tight enough. I use at least two, one compressing the suspension so it won't bounce around much, the other across a tire top, but through some frame so it won't slip off the tire. Very important to tie the loose ends securely so they don't get under a trailer tire. It will ruin your day.

Cross your safety chains under the tongue as you connect to the hitch. It catches the tongue if it comes off the ball. It also insures they are not too short and limiting turning. Grease the ball, lock the hitch down with a padlock. If they are not locked, they can and will pop off. Check you lights. If you don't have help, back up against a light wall and check them, looking back. Be sure and check turn signals and brake lights with the headlights on and with them off. Make sure you brakes are working perfectly before you tow, then test at a slow speed as you tow. Expect much longer stopping and starting distances.

Stop after 20 or 30 miles and check everything, pull up on the tongue, re-tighten the straps, check at least the hazard lights. If you go 100 miles, check again then. Remember you load when pulling out and changing lanes.

Towing a bike is probably the safest thing you can do with it, done safely. Probably the most dangerous if done wrong. If it's your first time towing, it's not a bad idea to buy you hitch at U-haul or such, and have them inspect the whole setup before you hit the highway. Or at least an experienced tower.

  • TrailRider15

Posted July 02, 2011 - 07:38 PM

#7

Build your own..... Doest have to have suspension or anything just weld bars and but wood and wheels on it!

  • ironxcross

Posted July 02, 2011 - 07:41 PM

#8

By mx hauler do you mean this?

http://www.google.co...ved=0CHsQ8wIwAA

Perhaps you could use one with some of these:

http://www.google.co...ed=0CJcBEPMCMAY

  • TrailRider15

Posted July 02, 2011 - 07:43 PM

#9

By mx hauler do you mean this?

http://www.google.co...ved=0CHsQ8wIwAA

Perhaps you could use one with some of these:

http://www.google.co...ed=0CJcBEPMCMAY


Thats exactly what i was thinking! When your not hauling it though, it might look a little funky :thumbsup:

  • Chickenhauler

Posted July 02, 2011 - 07:49 PM

#10

Harbor Freight makes a little trailer kit that many here on TT have purchased, assembled and used for tons of miles to tote their bikes around the country.

http://www.harborfre...eels-90154.html

$300 for the trailer, one sheet of plywood (3/4" treated), a bag of bolts, and one wheel chock and you're ready to rock.

Hitch and wiring connecter, maybe another $150 tops.

You can easily haul two bikes on that trailer, and alot of other stuff too (they come in handy when you only own an small car).

  • 400exrider103

Posted July 03, 2011 - 04:16 AM

#11

Harbor Freight makes a little trailer kit that many here on TT have purchased, assembled and used for tons of miles to tote their bikes around the country.

http://www.harborfre...eels-90154.html

$300 for the trailer, one sheet of plywood (3/4" treated), a bag of bolts, and one wheel chock and you're ready to rock.

Hitch and wiring connecter, maybe another $150 tops.

You can easily haul two bikes on that trailer, and alot of other stuff too (they come in handy when you only own an small car).


This is the trailer I was looking into. Thanks for all the replies.

  • knudsen

Posted July 03, 2011 - 04:20 AM

#12

4 x 8 would also be a good size, so you can go buy a sheet of plywood for another project some day. You'll find a good trailer is handy. A kit's fine. Don't make your own, unless you are an ME and a qualified welder, which you aren't, or you wouldn't have asked in the first place. I'm a booger welder! :thumbsup: Too much at stake. I rescued a guy on I65 from his home made trailer. He's lucky it failed on the off-ramp, or he'd be taking the big dirt nap now.

BTW: I would try to get a class 2 "box receiver" hitch, much sturdier than class 1 and you can setup for a level trailer.

  • Irishcrfrider

Posted July 03, 2011 - 03:38 PM

#13

firstly
I use a 1.9 golf tdi and Ive towed 3 bikes (2 250f's and 1 150f) along with all the gear, fuel, toolboxes, etc, even an awning. So theres plenty of power in that vehicle of yours. :thumbsup:

About the trailer, have you considered making one? A single axle with a chock and a few hours of welding would do the trick. And most custom made trailers are better than most of the ready built ones. But in saying that I dont know how that would fare out with your insurance.
Also unless the trailer is going to be kept in a garage I would consider a galvanised one, They'll stand up to anything you throw at them.

just my 0.02

  • Tdaz250

Posted July 03, 2011 - 08:18 PM

#14

MX hauler will work. Its not too heavy

  • mxstate

Posted July 04, 2011 - 09:53 AM

#15

I sold my Nissan Titan and got an econobox
I spent hours looking at my options if I was going to get away from a truck
Small SUVs have decent ground clearance

Posted Image
Posted Image

Harbor Freight 4x8 with 12" wheels and a few hours of mods
I think $350 total
Works great and very easy to load the bike (using my Fly ramp)
It gets the job done : taking me to the track and not spending a fortune on gas
Drawbacks are the reduced storage for gear, tools,etc.. and the "nice" interior that I'm struggling to keep in good shape from scratches, dirt.
I'm thinking of going back to a compact truck though....

  • 400exrider103

Posted July 04, 2011 - 12:47 PM

#16

I think Imma pick up the harbor freight 4x8, a friends got a universal hitch that will fit my car, hes gunna sell that to me for 35$, so I should be able to get a full setup for under 400.. Not to bad.

  • 400exrider103

Posted July 04, 2011 - 01:00 PM

#17

I sold my Nissan Titan and got an econobox
I spent hours looking at my options if I was going to get away from a truck
Small SUVs have decent ground clearance

Posted Image
Posted Image

Harbor Freight 4x8 with 12" wheels and a few hours of mods
I think $350 total
Works great and very easy to load the bike (using my Fly ramp)
It gets the job done : taking me to the track and not spending a fortune on gas
Drawbacks are the reduced storage for gear, tools,etc.. and the "nice" interior that I'm struggling to keep in good shape from scratches, dirt.
I'm thinking of going back to a compact truck though....


Thats the 4x8? Almost looks like the 4x4 where the board over hangs on both sides? Anyways nice setup :thumbsup:

  • Chickenhauler

Posted July 05, 2011 - 08:44 AM

#18

MX hauler will work. Its not too heavy


Cavalier's are not known for their load carrying capacity in the backseat.

Add on another 3' from the rear axle to the load carrying point, and it's not gonna do well.

  • 6 Riders

Posted July 05, 2011 - 11:31 AM

#19

Y'know if there's a Fred Meyer around you, they also sell a 4X8 folding trailer. It looks to be a bit better quality than the H.F. Trailer and it's usually on sale for $260. And you get fuel points:thumbsup:

  • Tdaz250

Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:26 PM

#20

:thumbsup: A friends got a 06? Cavalier...doesnt seem that bad when were all riding in it. If its just you in the front and a couple hundred pounds on the back thats probably the same as 2 people sitting in the back.




 
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