fork seal shot


7 replies to this topic
  • The Hopper Show

Posted June 22, 2011 - 04:21 PM

#1

it had just been barely leaving a film on the fork tube, so i was going to get to it this winter. well to my dismay, i found a very small puddle of oil on the ground this morning after last weekends ride. so...she has failed me.

so, attempt to do them myself having never done them before? or just take it to the shop?

what is the cost difference in doing it yourself vs the shop? and is there a step by step on here or in writing somewhere?

:ride:

  • RockyMtnScotsman

Posted June 22, 2011 - 06:24 PM

#2

A buddy of mine just had his seals replaced by a local dealer - set him back ~$220.

  • zibbit u2

Posted June 22, 2011 - 06:42 PM

#3

Do it yourself.. really easy job to do imo. Here's some vids to get you on the right track

Fork Seal Vid pt1 (disassembly)



Fork Seal Vid pt2 (reassembly)



A ziploc bag corner works well in substitution for the orange piece they show being used to slide the fork seal & dust boot down the fork leg... or just find some type of thicker plastic (2 or 3 layers of celophane wrap, sandwitch baggie, anything really) that you can drape over the top of the fork tube to cover all the sharp edges.

If the inner cartridge drops when you're installing the spring, wrap a piece of lockwire (2-3 ft lenght) with a few loose twists just below the "damper nut" they reference (the nut he had to pull the spring downward to access), and feed the lockwire thru the fork spring. Once the spring is all the way installed into the outter tube, pull the lockwire to pull the center cartridge up to install the top cap assembly. Once the top cap nut has a few threads started, remove the lockwire (if used) and tighten the nut as per tq specs. The damper nut inside the fork I believe is a 17mm. Fork seal driver on a 48mm KYB fork "can" be substituted for a 1.5" PVC pipe cut in half so you can slide it around the fork leg.

**** PAY NOTE to the orientation of the "flat washer" they refer to. It's supposed to face only one direction****

  • The Hopper Show

Posted June 22, 2011 - 09:25 PM

#4

damn that actually looks pretty easy. seems like it would not be too hard to do in a couple hours time.

what do you all recommend for brand of fork seals? what do you recommend for oil? is there a guide as to amount of oil that goes in?

would now be a good time to swap springs out to accomodate my body weight? is it that simple, or are there other things that need to be swapped such as valves?

and how about seal savers? do these have to be installed with the forks off? or can i install them at any time? and do you recommend i even run them? it is muddy where i ride...

http://www.sealsaver...2&products_id=2

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  • davidl9999

Posted June 22, 2011 - 09:36 PM

#5

damn that actually looks pretty easy. seems like it would not be too hard to do in a couple hours time.

what do you all recommend for brand of fork seals? what do you recommend for oil? is there a guide as to amount of oil that goes in?

OEM for seals, Bel-Ray or Motul for fork oil (imo), but can't say that I've ever tried a fork oil that didn't perform well. The manual has the quantity/level info. Download one from the WR250F forum if you don't have one.

would now be a good time to swap springs out to accomodate my body weight? is it that simple, or are there other things that need to be swapped such as valves?

Yes on the fork and shock springs. No on the valves and shim stack until you put your forks back together and are happy with the seal job. If you have a problem with the valves/shims, it's best not to confuse that with the regular maintenance activity you just did. Makes finding the real problem much harder. You also don't really want to revalve/shim the forks if you don't do the shock at the same time. Makes the bike ride like crap. IMO, just take the bike or send the forks/shock to your local quality tuner. I like the work that both RT and FC have done. I hear good things about some others, but haven't used them.

and how about seal savers? do these have to be installed with the forks off? or can i install them at any time? and do you recommend i even run them? it is muddy where i ride...

http://www.sealsaver...2&products_id=2

Yes and no. Yes they work - until something gritty gets trapped underneath and scores the fork tube. Then your wallet hates you. Some people have good luck with them. I don't run them (anymore). Better to ruin a seal than replace a tube.

  • zibbit u2

Posted June 23, 2011 - 10:25 AM

#6

what do you all recommend for brand of fork seals?


OEM, seals for oem performance at a high cost. Aftermarket seals... I've had good experience with the "all balls" brand of fork seals. Just make sure you pay note to the back of the packaging to figure out which direction (orientation) the seals are designed to work. There's a small gap side to the seal, and a large gap side to the seal... So pay attention.


what do you recommend for oil?


OEM spec weight oil. If not, then either go up in weight or down depending how you want the fork to react. Thinner oil (lower weight) will make the suspension softer/faster to react... inversly thicker oil (higher weight) will make the suspension stiffer/slower to react.

is there a guide as to amount of oil that goes in?


Specs from a 06 WR450 sharing the same config forks

Oil capacity : 650 cm3 (22.9 Imp oz, 22.0 US oz)
Oil level : 130 mm (5.12 in)
<Min, ~Max> : 95 ~ 150 mm (3.74 ~ 5.91 in) (From top of outer tube with inner tube and damper rod fully compressed without spring.)
Oil grade : S1

  • RockyMtnScotsman

Posted July 27, 2011 - 02:59 PM

#7

Well my left one just let go exactly the same manner as the OP described.

For the bike having so few miles on it (~800) I'm tempted to just do the left one, but also thinking I should go ahead and do both while I'm at at.

  • Magnetic

Posted July 27, 2011 - 07:09 PM

#8

Do it yourself.. really easy job to do imo. Here's some vids to get you on the right track

Fork Seal Vid pt1 (disassembly)



Fork Seal Vid pt2 (reassembly)



A ziploc bag corner works well in substitution for the orange piece they show being used to slide the fork seal & dust boot down the fork leg... or just find some type of thicker plastic (2 or 3 layers of celophane wrap, sandwitch baggie, anything really) that you can drape over the top of the fork tube to cover all the sharp edges.

If the inner cartridge drops when you're installing the spring, wrap a piece of lockwire (2-3 ft lenght) with a few loose twists just below the "damper nut" they reference (the nut he had to pull the spring downward to access), and feed the lockwire thru the fork spring. Once the spring is all the way installed into the outter tube, pull the lockwire to pull the center cartridge up to install the top cap assembly. Once the top cap nut has a few threads started, remove the lockwire (if used) and tighten the nut as per tq specs. The damper nut inside the fork I believe is a 17mm. Fork seal driver on a 48mm KYB fork "can" be substituted for a 1.5" PVC pipe cut in half so you can slide it around the fork leg.

**** PAY NOTE to the orientation of the "flat washer" they refer to. It's supposed to face only one direction****


Never replaced a fork seal in my life... until a couple weeks ago. I watched these videos and installed new springs, seals, dust seals in an hour or two. It really is as easy as the videos show.

Also, I used a 1.5" ID pvc cross + cut in half for my seal driver. Worked like a charm.




 
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