2001 WR 426 F... A Good Buy?


19 replies to this topic
  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 17, 2011 - 08:21 AM

#1

Hey all, I recently bought an older TTR 125 from a friend for $500. I've it has been some time since I had rode so the bike was a good "starter" bike. Now I have taken it out a few time and am starting to want something bigger (naturally). I found an add on CL for a 2001 WR 426F for 2100. Is this a good buy? I mainly ride single track, do some water crossings, and ride some open expances with whoops(sp). I don't intend on racing this bike or anything like that I just wan't to know if this bike is a good purchase.

Also, are there any weak spots I should look for if I do look at the bike?

Thank you for any assistance, take care.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted June 17, 2011 - 08:30 AM

#2

Seems like a heavy bike if you mainly ride single track. I got a 450, so I know exactly how heavy they can be.

You will like it much more in the open spaces than the single track.

Why such a big jump from a ttr125 to a wr426? Why not look at a wr250f instead. It will be better in the single track and will still go plenty fast in the open spaces.

  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 17, 2011 - 11:31 AM

#3

I'm tight on money (who isn't) and the asking price is cheaper than what most people are asking for up here. I would get a 250 but everyone in Alaska is sitting on pile of gold so it's tough to get a good deal. I'm pretty good on a bike, no expert by any means, but I can hold my own. I like the 125 but I'm 6' and about 190 so it's a bit small. There are a lot of open areas to ride up here, but I enjoy trail riding too. There are a lot of smaller trails on base that can fit a utility ATV no problem. I also would like to use the bike to do some back country camping.

  • allupinsydeyou

Posted June 17, 2011 - 12:48 PM

#4

just use KBB or something. those bikes out here in cali will sell for around 15-1700 TOPS unless its plated. the bike itself without a plate just stock is worth about 1300. so jew the guy down and get him to a reasonable price. but no plate... i would walk up with 1450 - 1500 in hand and say take it or leave it. make sure it starts and idles correct. feel the motor before you kick it and make sure it is stone cold. i hate when people warm up bikes before a buyer comes by... looks like they are trying to hide something.

  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 17, 2011 - 02:56 PM

#5

Thank you, thats good advice on the price. I'm still new to buying stuff like this and i'm not sure what a bike is really worth. I figure a new bike is about $6,500 but I don't know how fast the value drops. On N.A.D.A and KBB the value is about $1,500 or so. Seeing how things are more pricey in Alaska I'll see if he'll take 1,800 but I'll ask at 15.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted June 17, 2011 - 08:46 PM

#6

Its not a bad bike to have, but I think that the price is a little high also. What extras are included? That may help to justify the extra 400 he's asking for it?

  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 17, 2011 - 09:09 PM

#7

I need to take a look at it still. He dropped down to 1800 which is more reasonable. I want a bike I can ride out with minimal gear in a pack and just go. Do some camping away from everyone. Ive read that people seem to like the bike for it's intended purpose. There's a YZ426 for sale for 2,400. Is something i should consider instead?

  • miweber929

Posted June 18, 2011 - 05:33 AM

#8

Not if camping is in your future. A YZ is a race bike, not a trail bike. Biggest downside to a 400 and 426 is the kickstart. Unless you are skilled in the art of starting one of these beasts they can be troublesome to start. Notice I said "can". A WR450 cam with the auto decompressor will help but as a newbie to biking I will urge you to try to start it before you buy it. And try to start it cold.

When I look at a bike I ask the owner to make sure the bike is cold before I get there do that it's a clean start. Once the motor is hot, all bets are off.

Mike

  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 18, 2011 - 07:43 AM

#9

That's what I thought. It just seems like people are kinda iffy on the bike as a whole. I'll look at it cold and make sure it starts no problem. Is there any common failure points to look at?

Again, thanks for all the advice.

  • miweber929

Posted June 18, 2011 - 05:53 PM

#10

Nothing sticks out. Always ask about oil changes, air filter changes and valve checks on a 4 stroke.

My rule of thumb when looking at a dirt bike is to basically ignore the plastic as it can be changed with new for around $110. Things to look for are chain maint, air filter change, valve check and service interval and knowledge of the bike. None of these things are deal breakers, but all are things that will affect price. No regular air filter changes and no valve checks I'd walk.

Hope this helps. The 426's are nice bikes, it's just the 450's are better for little or no money difference. When I was looking I passed a plated 426 for my non-plated 450. All in all I am happy, but the plate would be nice. Just know kicking a bike can be troublesome, especially the 4 strokes.

Mike

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 18, 2011 - 09:07 PM

#11

Well I bought it. It's a whole hell of a lot more bike than the TTR 125. The guy took care of it bit was cold when I got there and he started it first kick. It takes me a few kicks to get it going but I'm still getting the feel for it. Just to be clear on that subject, kick the piston to TDC. Pull pressure release and move the kicker a few inches. Then come up a click and kick it. Should I give it some gas at any point? It takes me about 5-10 minutes to get it going.

  • RichFZR-WR

Posted June 18, 2011 - 11:06 PM

#12

Give it 2 pulls on the throttle when cold starting only, other wise leave it alone until motor starts.
Yes they can be tricky to start but when you got the knack its easy.
If your taking that long to start (5-10 mins) the plug will be soaked in fuel, if it doesn't look like it will start pull the plug, clean/dry off, regap (.7-.8 CR8E) Clear the cylinder, kick over with plug out a couple of times, refit plug/tank etc, then try again, should fire straight up after that.
Enjoy your 426, great bikes, little bit old now but still hold there own with the newer stuff

  • miweber929

Posted June 19, 2011 - 05:32 AM

#13

Give it 2 pulls on the throttle when cold starting only, other wise leave it alone until motor starts.
Yes they can be tricky to start but when you got the knack its easy.
If your taking that long to start (5-10 mins) the plug will be soaked in fuel, if it doesn't look like it will start pull the plug, clean/dry off, regap (.7-.8 CR8E) Clear the cylinder, kick over with plug out a couple of times, refit plug/tank etc, then try again, should fire straight up after that.
Enjoy your 426, great bikes, little bit old now but still hold there own with the newer stuff

+1

The 5-10 minutes you're talking about to get it going was why we were all sort of steering you away. Thing is, once you get the knack it's way easy. Getting there will be the test. And when you're sort of newbie and you stall it a ton, it'll get tiring. Fast.

I have a messed up back and kick-backs really cause pain hence the electric start. 2 strokes are easier, the big 4's can be a bit troubling.

Mike

  • Pooley

Posted June 19, 2011 - 01:31 PM

#14

Do all the free mods (eventually) as your comfort level increases, and get rid of the stock exhaust insert...if these have not been done already.

Starting should not take 5-10 minutes. Check the valve clearances, and if they are in spec once the carb is properly jetted, and you have the drill down, starting should be a non-issue. I still ride the 01 WR426 and it will start in just a few kicks, regardless of weather or how long it has been sitting. Never hold open the throttle while starting, it WILL kick back. 1-2 twists of the throttle and then put your hand on the front brake reservior, or anywhere away from the throttle. If you suspect the engine is flooded, hold the decomp level and kick the engine through 20ish times to clear it out. Then do 1 twist of the throttle and kick like you mean it. Sometimes after the bike has been flooded, or it seems to take forever to start the bike, try pulling the hotstart. Once there is too much fuel in the cylinder, it can be a pain to restart, and this is where the hotstart can help you.

The only real negative about the WR is weight. It is a big, heavy bike that will tire you out if the trail is really tight and gnarly. I'm 5'9" and around 180ish lbs, so you shouldn't have problems throwing the bike around, but it will never be as light as a 250 smoker.

The WR426 is bomb-proof and have great motors. I did a top end and cam chain on mine this winter, because I had to replace valve stem seals. Basically, the bike needed NOTHING but valve seals, and the cam chain was a bit stretched. I have never had to adjust the valve clearances in all this time either. I did a complete teardown of the motor and it looked brand new everywhere. I estimate I had somewhere around 8000 miles of mostly singletrack on it since I bought the bike new.

One thing you want to check out, and do some preventative maintenance on is the top of the swingarm, under the chain slider. The chain slider does not fit snugly and rattles around, rubbing on the top of the swingarm, wearing it. Cut an old innertube, piece of foam, or whatever to the correct shape to slightly lift the slider, protecting the swingarm and allowing for a tighter fit.

Also, regrease any and everything you can, especially the rear suspension linkage and swingarm pivot.

Finally, O-ring Mod:thumbsup:. Best mod in my opinion I have ever done to my 426. Eliminated the low end bog completely.

  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 19, 2011 - 07:21 PM

#15

Well i took it out today and had a blast. It was starting all day with one kick, maybe two. Then I dumped it (lightly) and it took a long time to start it again. I had to close the petcock and tip the bike over. Once the fuel stopped pouring out it would only take 2-5 kicks. In all though I am very pleased with the bike.

All the free mods were done and the pipe was uncorked. The guy I got it from knew what he was doing. However, what is the O-ring mod? It has a lot of power from the start and I have to keep the front end down in 1st and 2nd.

Thanks guys. You have been a lot of help.

  • Pooley

Posted June 20, 2011 - 03:47 PM

#16

Give this old thread a read. It is a link to some tuning work I did several years ago, as well as the Redbeard O-Ring mod.

http://www.thumperta...1725&highlight=

  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 21, 2011 - 12:01 AM

#17

Thanks Pooley, I'll have to see if that was done. I didn't notice any bog, but it did stall out on a really tight trail and when it would it took quite a bit of work to get it back runnnig. Is there any reasoning for that. I would have to close the petcock, lay the bike down until the fuel stopped pouring out, stand it up and kick it a few more times. Once it started again then I would open up the petcock. It just doesn't seem normal to me that I had to start it with the fuel off.

Either way, I enjoy the heck out of the bike. Well worth it so far.

  • Pooley

Posted June 21, 2011 - 10:11 AM

#18

When you stall it on the trail, use the hotstart. It is the red plunger on the carb. It allows more air into the carb, leaning the mix, allowing you to properly detonate the extra fuel that is in there. Once it is started, give it a quick rev, push the hotstart back in and off you go.

If you still need to shut off the fuel, tip the bike to drain the bowl, you may have some minor adjustments to make somewhere in terms of jetting, float level, etc.

  • miweber929

Posted June 21, 2011 - 11:17 AM

#19

Thanks Pooley, I'll have to see if that was done. I didn't notice any bog, but it did stall out on a really tight trail and when it would it took quite a bit of work to get it back runnnig. Is there any reasoning for that. I would have to close the petcock, lay the bike down until the fuel stopped pouring out, stand it up and kick it a few more times. Once it started again then I would open up the petcock. It just doesn't seem normal to me that I had to start it with the fuel off.

Either way, I enjoy the heck out of the bike. Well worth it so far.


Hard to tell at this distance, but I think you may have a stuck float. Probably a quick carb clean and checkup will tell you what you have for jetting and what has been modded and needs to be fixed.

Mike

  • AmnWatkins

Posted June 21, 2011 - 11:12 PM

#20

I rode it again this morning after work and it ran pretty good, it think I may have a bit of a bog now that I'm looking for it but I'm still new to this whole thing. It seemed to run better after I rode it for a while and it did really well when I hit a short single track I came across. I like that I can see myself improving everytime I ride, I take corners faster than I used too (even with the 125) and come out of them with a short wheelie.

I'll look into the carb today after work and clean it up some. I'll also look to see if the O-ring mod has been done or not. The only time it died on me was when I turned the bike around from a stop and opened the throttle way fast, the bike lurched and died. I then had to drain some fuel and it started right up after that. It's almost like the AP is flooding the bike when I open the throttle from a stand still. maybe?

Again, I can't thank you all enough for the help you have given me, I enjoy that it only takes me one or two kicks to start the bike now except for when it seems to have been flooded.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.