Krylon "Fusion" Spray Paint?



22 replies to this topic
  • jchantzWR400F

Posted August 28, 2003 - 06:39 AM

#1

I saw it at the hardware store yesterday, and was wondering if anyone has actually tried it yet on their plastics. Seems like an easy way to change the color up a bit. Wonder how well it would work on the gas tank? Curious about the durability. If anyone's had some success, let me know.

  • Twistagrip

Posted August 28, 2003 - 08:05 AM

#2

I used it on my R6's track plastics and it worked great. I used the clear coat on top and it gave it a nice gloss.:)
I don't think it would work to well on the gas tank though due to the fact that the plastic actually emits some gas vapors which would probably bubble the paint.

  • beezer

Posted August 28, 2003 - 08:59 AM

#3

Twist is correct the gas vapors go through the plastic and bubbl it up. Thats why stickers and decals don't stay on a plastic gas tank.

  • oRGie

Posted August 28, 2003 - 09:11 AM

#4

Twist is correct the gas vapors go through the plastic and bubbl it up. Thats why stickers and decals don't stay on a plastic gas tank.


Aahhh, that explains it then :)

  • MN_Kevin

Posted August 28, 2003 - 09:13 AM

#5

Krylon "Fusion" Spray Paint?




Funny you should mention this...I JUST bought some yellow to see if it might work on my Hannah Racing Replica...

I do suppose it will flake off due to the abuse though...

Heys what's $4 anyways? :)

A beer, that's what $4 is!!!

  • jchantzWR400F

Posted August 28, 2003 - 10:19 AM

#6

I don't think it would work to well on the gas tank though due to the fact that the plastic actually emits some gas vapors which would probably bubble the paint.



[/QUOTE]

I've often wondered about the theory that the gas vapors actually get emitted (escape) through the plastic. In order for the vapors to be emitted, wouldn't the plastic have to be porous? I know it's not porous, because my gas doesn't leak out. Are the gas vapors somehow absorbed into the plastic, then, release on the other side? I've taken a few chemistry courses, and that doesn't sound right. So then, how exactly do the vapors exit the tank and ruin our graphics?

Or, do our graphics simply begin to peel around the edges because of other reasons? One theory would be that due to the vapor pressure of gasoline, the plastic gas tank will expand and contract during the course of the day (due to temperature changes). Could this put enough stress on the adhesive to cause it to fail? If this were the case, I would assume that it would also put stress on any paint that would be used and cause it to bubble or crack. :) Which might answer my question about the piant on the tank.

Oh well, food for thought.

  • beezer

Posted August 28, 2003 - 10:33 AM

#7

Goretex fabric is water proof but still allows ventilation.

Gas goes bad faster in a plastic can or tank. Thats why you should store gas in a metal container.

  • ogrebelle

Posted August 28, 2003 - 11:06 AM

#8

NH_Kevin,
What is your "Hannah Racing Replica"? Really, I'm dying to know the details.
Doug

  • jchantzWR400F

Posted August 28, 2003 - 01:41 PM

#9

Well, I would agree that Gortex is spash resistant, but not water proof. And, it is not designed to be air tight. Plastic is. So, if plastic is air tight, how do gas vapors penetrate it?

  • cnacc

Posted August 28, 2003 - 02:22 PM

#10

Osmosis??? :) :D

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • BigDesto

Posted August 28, 2003 - 02:45 PM

#11

Well, I would agree that Gortex is spash resistant, but not water proof. And, it is not designed to be air tight. Plastic is. So, if plastic is air tight, how do gas vapors penetrate it?


Where did you here gortex is not waterproof??????
IT IS!!

  • oldbones

Posted August 28, 2003 - 02:53 PM

#12

Gas does leak out of your plastic tank. It just does it very slowly. Slow enough that if you had no stickers on your tanks, you would never know it, because it evaporates as soon as it makes it to the surface. But, where it gets stuck behind the stickers, I think it builds up some, and then reacts with the adhesive. My one year old bike, the stickers are still attached and physically in good shape, but the white portions on the tank are turning yellow. The white portions on the radiator shrouds however, are still bright white.

By the same logic, if you painted over the plastic, it might look ok for a while, but would probabaly not last all that long. Not to mention your plastics flex and bend, and the paint may not do too well at that. I would expect it to crack and peel.

But, maybe I just have my head up my @$$, did you ever think of that? :)

  • Gadsen

Posted August 28, 2003 - 09:19 PM

#13

Tires are also air tight, but you must add air all the time. I had a KDX 220 that I installed all the "One Industries" graphics, the white on the tank became yellowish in color. It was full of holes to relase the vapors and allow it to hold to the tank. It does hold well, but did discolor. There is white elsewhere in the kit, only the tank stuff turned yellowish. I dont know why, I just know it does "outgass" :)

  • jchantzWR400F

Posted August 29, 2003 - 06:17 AM

#14

Well, I would agree that Gortex is spash resistant, but not water proof. And, it is not designed to be air tight. Plastic is. So, if plastic is air tight, how do gas vapors penetrate it?


Where did you here gortex is not waterproof??????
IT IS!!


If it's not air tight, then how can it be water proof. Think about it!!!

  • SBG

Posted August 29, 2003 - 06:37 AM

#15

The gas vapors come from missing the spout, or when you are filling the spout the vapors are surrounding the filler hole and making contact with the plastic. The vapors also find their way out of areas that bolt into the plastic, like the petcock, or a loose cap. The fuel does not find it's way through the plastic. If it did, there would be some regulation against plastic tanks as those external vapors could combust from a spark. The stickers come off due to a capillary effect that wisks the fuel to the edges of the stickers if you accidentally spill gas on the tank. The gas breaks the glues bond. You can paint your tanks and it should be fine. I painted an XR200 tank about 10 years ago. No paint has bubbled peeled, or anything else. You just have to prep the surface well. Also, I painted my tank before FUSION was around. This FUSION paint actually is supposed to form a BOND with the plastic. Not just like it's sitting on the surface.

Also, tires are not air tight. The valve stems are a mechanical device and corrode. That corrosion lets air slip past. Also the spring in the stem being corroded doesn't have enough force to close 100%. If it's not the stem, the rubber on the bead may have imperfections allowing air to pass. The wheels may also be defective. The gas tank is the same way. It is what is connected that allows gas to escape.

  • BrandonW

Posted August 29, 2003 - 07:01 AM

#16

If it's not air tight, then how can it be water proof. Think about it!!!




I am no scientist, but looking at H2O, it comes in three forms; ice (solid), liquid (water) and vapor (steam). When solid, it takes up the most space, and the least when in vapor, as the molecules are in no definite shape. Maybe the holes are small enough to allow passage of some vapors, yet not big enough to allow passage of gas in the liquid form?

  • ToSlow2Care

Posted August 29, 2003 - 07:11 AM

#17

it's called a hydro-phobic Filter. it is a material that allows air to pass through it but does not allow watter to patt through. the water molicules are too large to pass through the material because they are H2O air is a maixture not chemically bonded together of O2, N2, CO2, CO, and numeroous other things.

(info provided by fathers Medical device manufacturing company) :D

NERD ALERT - Excessive Nerdage - GEEK!!!!!!!! :)

  • SBG

Posted August 29, 2003 - 10:09 AM

#18

Check the TTR BB for a pic of a 125 with black Fusion paint. Looks cool.

  • jchantzWR400F

Posted August 29, 2003 - 01:43 PM

#19

If it's not air tight, then how can it be water proof. Think about it!!!




I am no scientist, but looking at H2O, it comes in three forms; ice (solid), liquid (water) and vapor (steam). When solid, it takes up the most space, and the least when in vapor, as the molecules are in no definite shape. Maybe the holes are small enough to allow passage of some vapors, yet not big enough to allow passage of gas in the liquid form?




So, you're saying that there must be holes in the molded plastic.

  • jchantzWR400F

Posted August 29, 2003 - 01:49 PM

#20

OK, you guys gotta see the TTR. I think it looks good. I just wonder about the durability. But, at $4 per can, even if you had to touch up once in a while, it wouldn't be too bad.




 
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