03 YZ450F Swingarm/Linkage Bearings


22 replies to this topic
  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 03, 2011 - 04:49 PM

#1

So my bikes rear end started to feel very stiff so i decided it was time to re-lube all the bearings in the swingarm and rear suspension link. I got the link out and found my problem. All bearings were completely frozen with rust. I am obviously replacing them. The swingarm is still attached to the rest of the bike because i cannot (yet) get the bolt out of where it goes through the frame. But moving the swingarm by hand yields very smooth movement and no noise whatsoever, so it makes me thing those bearings might still be in good shape. I guess what im asking is can i get away with just replacing the rear link bearing assemblies and leave the swingarm the way it is, or should i just replace them all while im at it. Cost is a factor for me here also.

  • grayracer513

Posted June 03, 2011 - 05:02 PM

#2

The problem is less the condition of the bearings in this case than it is the fact that your swing arm bolt is rusted in place. However well the pivot is working, you will eventually have to either remove it, or quietly pass it on to the next owner (nice guy!). The bolt runs through the frame in two places, obviously, and then through a steel sleeve that is the inner race for each of two sets of pivot bearings, and then through two more steel sleeves in the crankcase. Get a can of PB Blaster and work some into every joint you can get to, then let it sit, refreshing it daily for 4-5 days. Then screw the nut down over the threads, get hold of a big steel dowel or a socket turned upside down and work it vigorously with a BFH until it decides to cooperate. You may end up having to buy a new pivot, but they're not that bad.

  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 03, 2011 - 05:47 PM

#3

As tempted as i have been to dump this bike and get a newer one, i really love this 03. Ive ridden the newer ones and for whatever reason, they just dont feel as powerful as mine. Plus im very short on $$$ right now so im gonna just fix what i have. Im just a Dad that really just enjoys riding with my kids so i really dont NEED a new bike. That being said i certainly wouldnt pass along a problem bike to an unsuspecting person. I suppose i will just remove the pivot bolt (im sure i can get it out eventually) and replace all the bearings completely. It just sucks that these bearing sets are so expensive. $76 for the suspension pivot kit and $60 for the swingarm. Thats a lot of money for a few bearings and bushings.

  • grayracer513

Posted June 03, 2011 - 06:26 PM

#4

Im just a Dad that really just enjoys riding with my kids ....

Those are the best times you'll ever have. Be sure you savor every minute of it. It will end way too soon.

  • tl1000rlt

Posted June 03, 2011 - 06:34 PM

#5

Those are the best times you'll ever have. Be sure you savor every minute of it. It will end way too soon.


I agree, and you would not want one of those days cut short by injury or mechanical issue.

Other than that it will ride better. BRAAAAAAP

  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 03, 2011 - 06:45 PM

#6

Those are the best times you'll ever have. Be sure you savor every minute of it. It will end way too soon.


Yeah i know, certain things i can feel coming already. They wont hug me in front of their friends anymore. :ride: When they were really little i would tell them that day was coming, but they said it would never happen, but it did. While the swingarm botl is frozen, is there a remote chance that the bearings are sill save-able? Or is it pretty much a forgone conclusion that they are shot as well? If they were in fact rusted out, i wouldnt think the swingarm would pivot so smoothly.

Edited by BlueMagiC, June 03, 2011 - 07:01 PM.


  • grayracer513

Posted June 03, 2011 - 07:15 PM

#7

... is there a remote chance that the bearings are sill save-able?

Can't tell until you see them, but the bolt will be harder to extract every day it stays in there.

  • scottp111

Posted June 03, 2011 - 07:27 PM

#8

Yeah i know, certain things i can feel coming already. They wont hug me in front of their friends anymore. :ride: When they were really little i would tell them that day was coming, but they said it would never happen, but it did. While the swingarm bolt is frozen, is there a remote chance that the bearings are sill save-able? Or is it pretty much a forgone conclusion that they are shot as well? If they were in fact rusted out, i wouldn't think the swingarm would pivot so smoothly.


I would think they are toast. I just did mine and your are right it is a lot of cash. It was totally worth it after riding with the new bearings. I can tell the suspension works so much better and I'm no where near an expert rider.

  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 04, 2011 - 08:17 AM

#9

I got the swingarm bolt out and was pleasantly surprised to see that the bearings in there were fully greased and in great shape. So now im only looking at the linkage bearings. Holy crap these old bearings are IMPOSSIBLE to get out. Thinking of having a machine shop press them out...ive tried everything i can think of and they wont even START to move.

Edited by BlueMagiC, June 04, 2011 - 10:02 AM.


  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 04, 2011 - 11:56 AM

#10

Definitely taking these to a shop, they arent going to come out in my garage. The collars are actually collapsing on the inside without the other end starting to come out...no idea why Yamaha would design this crap like this. It should NEVER be this hard to remove a part that is part of normal/regular maintenance.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Schpenxel

Posted June 04, 2011 - 12:29 PM

#11

Heat.

Or grinder.

  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 04, 2011 - 12:33 PM

#12

Tried heat...the bearing sleeves themselves are collapsing inside the linkage....what do you mean "grinder" ?

  • Bobbed06

Posted June 04, 2011 - 01:25 PM

#13

Definitely taking these to a shop, they arent going to come out in my garage. The collars are actually collapsing on the inside without the other end starting to come out...no idea why Yamaha would design this crap like this. It should NEVER be this hard to remove a part that is part of normal/regular maintenance.


Use a socket that is as close in size to the OD as possible. Be sure and use a solid surface like concrete with a 2x4 board to maximize your driving force.
It doesnt hurt to use some heat here, either with a propane torch or my preferred method setting the part on my electric stove. Work quickly with gloves and you should be successful. Post results

  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 04, 2011 - 02:49 PM

#14

I finally got them! Heat from a propane torch was absolutely essential here. Once i got it hot enough, i could actually hear the rust "pinging" away from the aluminum. Drilled a 1 1/2" hole through a 2x6 and placed the pieces centered over the hole so i could beat the bearings through the hole while the wood allowed me to beat the hell out of the socket without damaging the aluminum parts.

  • scottp111

Posted June 04, 2011 - 02:51 PM

#15

They don't have to be pretty coming out. Just get them out anyway you can and clean up the aluminum after its out. New bearings will go in much easier but will still require significant force. Driving them in with a socket worked quite well.

  • Bobbed06

Posted June 04, 2011 - 05:13 PM

#16

I finally got them! Heat from a propane torch was absolutely essential here. Once i got it hot enough, i could actually hear the rust "pinging" away from the aluminum. Drilled a 1 1/2" hole through a 2x6 and placed the pieces centered over the hole so i could beat the bearings through the hole while the wood allowed me to beat the hell out of the socket without damaging the aluminum parts.


Good deal, I would use a C Clamp setup to reinstall the new bearings, once you get them started nice and straight by gently tapping them in with a brass or soft hammer. You can always heat the linkage and install the bearings after freezing them, many times they fall in place. No heat can be applied to the new bearings though as they have some teflon cages in them.

  • baxterj787

Posted June 05, 2011 - 10:57 AM

#17

To back up what Bobbed06 just said: I use a large bench vise and an assortment of "throwaway" sockets to press link bearings in / out. I can get lots of force, evenly applied. It is a lot more precise than a hammer, and more forceful than a C-clamp.

Enjoy riding with the kids. I always treasured riding with my father, and am looking forward to riding with my son (3 y.o.). My wife has other ideas...:ride:

Edited by baxterj787, June 05, 2011 - 10:58 AM.
I forgot how to spell...


  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 05, 2011 - 11:35 AM

#18

To back up what Bobbed06 just said: I use a large bench vise and an assortment of "throwaway" sockets to press link bearings in / out. I can get lots of force, evenly applied. It is a lot more precise than a hammer, and more forceful than a C-clamp.

Enjoy riding with the kids. I always treasured riding with my father, and am looking forward to riding with my son (3 y.o.). My wife has other ideas...:ride:


My wife was the exact same way when i put our first child on a KDX50 at the age of 3 with no training wheels. She is fully supportive of their riding now though. I have to tell you, starting young kids out riding MX gets extremely expensive as they dont stay on one bike for very long because they grow like watered weeds!

  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 09, 2011 - 06:03 PM

#19

Just got this finished up and i have to say...i wouldnt wish this job on ANYBODY! What a pain in the ass, greasy, hot, slimy, nasty job it was to finish this up right. But wow, what a difference in the rear end of the bike. Like night and day with the new bearings.

  • Schpenxel

Posted June 10, 2011 - 04:52 AM

#20

How much did it end up costing you? Pretty sure mine needs it pretty soon.





Related Content

 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.