Strongest aftermarket hubs. 07' 450


29 replies to this topic
  • grayracer513

Posted June 02, 2011 - 06:57 AM

#21

So what actually holds the sleeves in?

In the third method? They are press fit to the hub, slip fit in the sprocket, and held captive by the bolt head and the nut.

Your neighbor's idea won't accomplish what you want. The trouble you had is with the sprocket shifting and enlarging the bolts. Fixing the bolts to the sprocket won't stop that, but replacing the bolts with studs threaded to the hub would. So would bolts press fit to the hub as automotive lug nuts are. The trouble with either of those schemes here is that you'd need conical washers to put nuts on the outside, and there isn't room for nuts on the outside, anyway.

You don't know how fast you can go if you aren't crashing.

The Dave Aldana theory. Don't take up flying.

  • Polar_Bus

Posted June 02, 2011 - 08:40 AM

#22

You don't know how fast you can go if you aren't crashing.


Damon Bradshaw had the same mentality. Extremly fast rider watching him closely at the races, but dirt augering on his ass every lap. Thats exactly why he was NEVER sucessfull....

  • BlueMagiC

Posted June 02, 2011 - 09:47 AM

#23

Most hub failures are in fact the result of "pilot error" and not the factory parts failing because they are inadequate.

Edited by grayracer513, June 02, 2011 - 12:19 PM.
piling on


  • Moto Andy

Posted June 03, 2011 - 09:44 AM

#24

Damon Bradshaw had the same mentality. Extremly fast rider watching him closely at the races, but dirt augering on his ass every lap. Thats exactly why he was NEVER sucessfull....


So does/did bubba, charmichael, villopoto and all the guys that are winning. I think it's safe to say the fastest rider who doesn't crash consistently is Dungey, and Windham. But Windham isn't winning, and Dungey still crashes.

Gray...so how about threading the hub to match the bolt threads? I have the necessary tools to do that. Or you think there's to much heat and pressure and that will ruin the hub too?
Oh, and i hate flying so we're good. I'll still be getting a new hub either way, and well sh-t happens, so i'm just trying to reduce wear and tear such as this, even with "misuse". Which is really just lack of maintenance in some cases, my neighbor has a track, i typically work 7 days a week and school for 2 at 26 y.o, so i don't always have the time to meticulously work on everything. Which is where stronger parts help. Fact is i don't want to have to be retightening the bolts every time a ride again after i do replace the hub.

  • grayracer513

Posted June 03, 2011 - 09:58 AM

#25

Gray...so how about threading the hub to match the bolt threads?

Fact is i don't want to have to be retightening the bolts every time a ride again after i do replace the hub.

The trouble there again is that there's no room for anything but countersunk Allen or Torx bolts going in from the outside, and those are difficult to tighten because the tools tend to roll over and slip. Then there's the matter of the receiving threads being aluminum rather than steel. But that would work otherwise.

I will say again that none of the 7 rear wheels I've had in 5 YZF's have had any problem with sprockets loosening. OEM hubs, aluminum sprockets, stock bolts. Tighten the nuts, hold the bolts.

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  • 21YZs and counting

Posted June 03, 2011 - 10:31 AM

#26

The trouble there again is that there's no room for anything but countersunk Allen or Torx bolts going in from the outside, and those are difficult to tighten because the tools tend to roll over and slip. Then there's the matter of the receiving threads being aluminum rather than steel. But that would work otherwise.

I will say again that none of the 7 rear wheels I've had in 5 YZF's have had any problem with sprockets loosening. OEM hubs, aluminum sprockets, stock bolts. Tighten the nuts, hold the bolts.


The last sentence says it all. I have seen many people and friends hold the nut, tighten the bolt which gives much less torque on nuts than indicated.

  • Moto Andy

Posted June 03, 2011 - 05:28 PM

#27

The trouble there again is that there's no room for anything but countersunk Allen or Torx bolts going in from the outside, and those are difficult to tighten because the tools tend to roll over and slip. Then there's the matter of the receiving threads being aluminum rather than steel. But that would work otherwise.

I will say again that none of the 7 rear wheels I've had in 5 YZF's have had any problem with sprockets loosening. OEM hubs, aluminum sprockets, stock bolts. Tighten the nuts, hold the bolts.


10-4 rubber ducky. and no Loctite right. Good to know the hold the bolt and tighten the nuts, didn't think that would make a difference. So clearly i don't have a manual, whats the torque settings for the bolts?

  • grayracer513

Posted June 03, 2011 - 05:45 PM

#28

No reason not to have a manual:

http://www.yamaha-mo...uals/index.aspx
http://www.yamahaown...ook.com.au/?r=0

The torque is spec'd at 30 ft/lb. Tightening the nuts makes using a torque wrench a little tricky, so I usually just go by feel with a box end wrench. But that's what turning wrenches for over 40 years will get you.

  • Polar_Bus

Posted June 04, 2011 - 02:53 AM

#29

But that's what turning wrenches for over 40 years will get you.


When torquing a nut by hand without the aid of a torque wrench , as soon as the arthritis in my right wrist causes the bones to pop, that's 22ft/lbs for me. :ride:

  • QuietFlight

Posted June 05, 2011 - 05:50 AM

#30

When torquing a nut by hand without the aid of a torque wrench , as soon as the arthritis in my right wrist causes the bones to pop, that's 22ft/lbs for me. :ride:



this really made me laugh good!





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