Strongest aftermarket hubs. 07' 450


29 replies to this topic
  • Moto Andy

Posted May 29, 2011 - 07:30 PM

#1

So i've got an 07' an i've heard they are notorious for eating rear hubs. My sprocket and bolts are finally beyond just tightening and time for a replacement. There are a thousand different brands it seems like, what hubs you guys think i should put on. Oh yea maybe a stronger rear chain guide too?

  • rickallen124

Posted May 29, 2011 - 08:12 PM

#2

TCR or Talon. TCR uses stock bearings and wheel spacers which makes it easier to get parts. Both are made out of billet aluminum. Stock hubs are 1/3 the cost so it's quite a bit less money and you could replace them more often. I'd get tcr if I were getting aftermarket hubs.

  • mikedabike

Posted May 29, 2011 - 10:26 PM

#3

Everyone that I have seen have hub problems was from improper chain adjustment.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 29, 2011 - 10:51 PM

#4

So i've got an 07' an i've heard they are notorious for eating rear hubs.

That's BS.

Like Mike said, the hubs that broke almost all broke due to over tightening the chain. Read: http://www.thumperta...182#post8906182

Some early '06's appear to have had a legitimate problem with loosening the bearing pocket on the drive side, but that's it.

  • Moto Andy

Posted May 30, 2011 - 05:24 PM

#5

ok....so thanks for the link. But that solidified the fact that my chain wasn't too tight. I've used the slightly more than a 3 finger gauge for the adjustment. Almost every time i ride i had to re-tighten the sprocket bolts, as it is now the holes in the hub for the bolts are larger and oblonged so they bolts actually move. I'm getting rid of the stupid aluminum sprocket and putting a steel one on, what else?

And thanks to rickallen for answering my question, instead of telling me why my hub is shot.

  • Slinkyman16

Posted May 30, 2011 - 08:19 PM

#6

What sprocket bolts are u using? Are u using any loctite on the threads? Ive done alot of research on hubs and wheels myself and have found the stock hubs are not only lighter but stronger then almost anything on the market.. Just not as cool looking as billet. I have over 280 hours and 5 years of riding mx on my stock hubs.. But I loctite my bolts to my hub and use proper torque procedure when installing new sprockets..

  • rickallen124

Posted May 30, 2011 - 08:26 PM

#7

The 06-08 hubs had a tendency to loosen the drive side bearing pocket which is why Yamaha went to a larger axle with two bearings on the drive side in 09. I had my 08 wear to the point that the bearing was loose and would just fall out of the wheel when you took the spacers out. I replaced it with an oem hub because it was quite a bit cheaper and I planed on getting a new bike which the hub wouldn't fit. I've never had a problem with the flange or the bolt holes wearing out. If you get steel sprockets be carefull as some of them are only attached at the tabs which can put added stress on the hub if the chain is over tight. MXA tested a vortex sprocket on a yamaha gytr project bike and they had problems with the hub which they attributed to the fact that the sprocket only made contact with the hub at the mounting tabs.

  • gscx

Posted May 30, 2011 - 08:30 PM

#8

ok....so thanks for the link. But that solidified the fact that my chain wasn't too tight. I've used the slightly more than a 3 finger gauge for the adjustment. Almost every time i ride i had to re-tighten the sprocket bolts, as it is now the holes in the hub for the bolts are larger and oblonged so they bolts actually move. I'm getting rid of the stupid aluminum sprocket and putting a steel one on, what else?

And thanks to rickallen for answering my question, instead of telling me why my hub is shot.


It doesnt matter what hubs you have. The holes in them will just get oblonged again. Something is wrong with the way you are tightening your bolts or with your chain tightening. Fix the disease, not just the symptoms.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 31, 2011 - 06:31 AM

#9

I never know what to tell someone who starts out with the preconceived notion that the OEM component is inadequate. If that were the case with the rear hub on a YZ450, everyone would have the problem, and everyone doesn't.

Unfortunately, once the sprocket mounting holes have been beat into slots, the only cure for it is boring the holes oversize on a rotary table so it can be done precisely, and inserting steel sleeves, or pinning the sprocket to the hub.

Aluminum sprockets are not to blame either. In fact, steel sprockets, even those with a full circle mounting ring, are more likely to slip against the hub flange than aluminum is. I'm on my 5th YZF, and I run the stock Sunstar cogs until they wear out, or are the wrong size, and then I replace them with Tags. I use the stock sprocket bolts without Loc-Tite, and I've had zero problems with sprockets loosening on any of 5 different YZF's ridden by two different people.

But whatever is said to anyone with this problem, it's never their fault.

  • Moto Andy

Posted May 31, 2011 - 08:59 PM

#10

I never know what to tell someone who starts out with the preconceived notion that the OEM component is inadequate. If that were the case with the rear hub on a YZ450, everyone would have the problem, and everyone doesn't.

Unfortunately, once the sprocket mounting holes have been beat into slots, the only cure for it is boring the holes oversize on a rotary table so it can be done precisely, and inserting steel sleeves, or pinning the sprocket to the hub.

Aluminum sprockets are not to blame either. In fact, steel sprockets, even those with a full circle mounting ring, are more likely to slip against the hub flange than aluminum is. I'm on my 5th YZF, and I run the stock Sunstar cogs until they wear out, or are the wrong size, and then I replace them with Tags. I use the stock sprocket bolts without Loc-Tite, and I've had zero problems with sprockets loosening on any of 5 different YZF's ridden by two different people.

But whatever is said to anyone with this problem, it's never their fault.


Thanks for some legitimate help. I am switching to a steel sprocket because steel is just plain stronger and won't wear out as quick. No matter the conditions or misuse. The weight does not make a difference to me. The front sprocket is steel why shouldn't the back one be.

I think the problem with the hub was minimal when i bought the bike as it was not new, and it just finally compounded itself to what it is now. I wasn't using loctite, thought that was bad for those particular bolts.

I had actually thought about taking it to a machine shop and having them drill it and put in steel sleeves but i figured it would be just as expensive as buying an aftermarket hub. What do you mean "pinning" the sprocket to the hub?

Also i never said it wasn't my fault, never denied anything. When i started the topic i simply asked what the strongest hubs were. I didn't ask what i was doing wrong or why it was happening. If anyone who has ever asked this question was consistently made out to look like a fool because they are apparently too ignorant to know how tight a chain is supposed to be...well this site wouldn't be up for very long. So lay the :smirk: off. It's unnecessary. Does it make you feel better putting somebody down who asked a simple question?

And most OEM products are inadequate, they are made out of the cheapest materials, in a computer operated factory, with people plugging codes into the machines, and all they care about care about stamping out enough and cutting costs enough so they can make an extra penny. Crappy steel, crappy aluminum, mass produced.

I never know what to say to somebody who has almost 30,000 posts on any website (30,000posts/ 8 years / 365days in a year = 10.28 posts a day) who is probably surfing it all day while they probably sit behind a desk they are supposed to be working at, like a shark waiting to annihilate somebody who posts a question that they deem as worthy of a rude and belittling comment. All while claiming to be onto their 5th yz. Thanks for making the world a better place bud.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • mikedabike

Posted May 31, 2011 - 09:32 PM

#11

Thanks for some legitimate help. I am switching to a steel sprocket because steel is just plain stronger and won't wear out as quick. No matter the conditions or misuse. The weight does not make a difference to me. The front sprocket is steel why shouldn't the back one be.

I think the problem with the hub was minimal when i bought the bike as it was not new, and it just finally compounded itself to what it is now. I wasn't using loctite, thought that was bad for those particular bolts.

I had actually thought about taking it to a machine shop and having them drill it and put in steel sleeves but i figured it would be just as expensive as buying an aftermarket hub. What do you mean "pinning" the sprocket to the hub?

Also i never said it wasn't my fault, never denied anything. When i started the topic i simply asked what the strongest hubs were. I didn't ask what i was doing wrong or why it was happening. If anyone who has ever asked this question was consistently made out to look like a fool because they are apparently too ignorant to know how tight a chain is supposed to be...well this site wouldn't be up for very long. So lay the :smirk: off. It's unnecessary. Does it make you feel better putting somebody down who asked a simple question?

And most OEM products are inadequate, they are made out of the cheapest materials, in a computer operated factory, with people plugging codes into the machines, and all they care about care about stamping out enough and cutting costs enough so they can make an extra penny. Crappy steel, crappy aluminum, mass produced.

I never know what to say to somebody who has almost 30,000 posts on any website (30,000posts/ 8 years / 365days in a year = 10.28 posts a day) who is probably surfing it all day while they probably sit behind a desk they are supposed to be working at, like a shark waiting to annihilate somebody who posts a question that they deem as worthy of a rude and belittling comment. All while claiming to be onto their 5th yz. Thanks for making the world a better place bud.


I actually think most of the time OEM is the best choice. When I choose aftermarket it is usually because of cost almost never due to a quality issue. Can you name some examples where aftermarket is superior to OEM. By the way I have several sets of wheels with OEM and aftermarket hubs and I can say the OEM have caused me by far the least amount of problems.

Just my opinion.

  • Polar_Bus

Posted June 01, 2011 - 01:57 AM

#12

I used to laugh my ass off when I would see a kid in the novice or amatuer ranks pull into the gate with "bling" Talon hubs. This immediately told me the kid doesn't know how to ride and needs some type of intimidation factor....

24 years of racing and wrenching bikes, NEVER trashed a hub, never even came close to needing an aftermarket hub.

Maintain spoke torque, loctite and maintain sprocket bolts you will never need anything more than the original hubs.

I can tell you there is a lot of YZF rear hubs out there that are trashed. And it's because neither of the above mentioned practices were followed.

  • grayracer513

Posted June 01, 2011 - 06:43 AM

#13

What do you mean "pinning" the sprocket to the hub?

First, the sprocket is bolted to the hub and torqued down. Then, a suitable number of holes (probably at least 3) are drilled through the sprocket and hub flange, and steel pins inserted to prevent the sprocket "working" on the flange surface. Variations include oversizing the sprocket holes very slightly so the pins can be press fit to the hub but remain a slip fit on the sprocket, or the use of roll pins press fit to both parts that can be driving through to release the sprocket when it becomes necessary to change it.

  • Moto Andy

Posted June 01, 2011 - 07:27 AM

#14

I actually think most of the time OEM is the best choice. When I choose aftermarket it is usually because of cost almost never due to a quality issue. Can you name some examples where aftermarket is superior to OEM. By the way I have several sets of wheels with OEM and aftermarket hubs and I can say the OEM have caused me by far the least amount of problems.

Just my opinion.

Fluidyne radiators, are a hundred times better, the stock rads are more expensive and made out of inferior metals that cannot even be welded by a highly decorated shop. are also bent extremely easily. Handlebars are a given, I've bent stocks and pro tapers, never renthals. excels come stock on yz's which is not always the case, aftermarket chains, clutch and brake levers and perches....do I need to keep going.

First, the sprocket is bolted to the hub and torqued down. Then, a suitable number of holes (probably at least 3) are drilled through the sprocket and hub flange, and steel pins inserted to prevent the sprocket "working" on the flange surface. Variations include oversizing the sprocket holes very slightly so the pins can be press fit to the hub but remain a slip fit on the sprocket, or the use of roll pins press fit to both parts that can be driving through to release the sprocket when it becomes necessary to change it.


Interesting....like cotter pins basically?

  • grayracer513

Posted June 01, 2011 - 07:48 AM

#15

...the stock rads are ... made out of inferior metals that cannot even be welded by a highly decorated shop.

You may need a new decorator. Myler's Radiator Repair has never had a problem reconstructing YZ radiators.


Interesting....like cotter pins basically?

Cotters are far too soft. The pins need to be hardened steel dowels that look somewhat like roller bearings, or spring steel roll pins at the least. The problem with the pinning scheme here is locating a spot on the hub flange that is both far enough from the bolt holes and in an area of the flange where there is an adequate amount of material for the drilling.

A third method along the same lines is to drill the hub flange to accept steel doweling sleeves that will extend into enlarged mounting holes in the sprocket.

  • Polar_Bus

Posted June 01, 2011 - 08:27 AM

#16

Fluidyne radiators, are a hundred times better, the stock rads are more expensive and made out of inferior metals that cannot even be welded by a highly decorated shop. are also bent extremely easily. Handlebars are a given, I've bent stocks and pro tapers, never renthals. excels come stock on yz's which is not always the case, aftermarket chains, clutch and brake levers and perches....do I need to keep going.



Interesting....like cotter pins basically?


I think you need to slow down and stop wreaking bikes . As for the rads, find another welder. There is nothing "inferior" about the OEM rad material. I had a very small crack at the base of the tank, the AWS boiler code welders at my work did a fantastic repair job.... yes I agree the OEM rads are very expensive and bend easy, it's the nature of the beast when you are striving to shave ounces of weight off a bikes' chassis. The easiest route is to simply make components from thinner material This is why I got Moose rad braces after my first YZF lowside.

  • WGP

Posted June 01, 2011 - 12:07 PM

#17

The real question is:

Who makes the strongest Rim?

I was told Sun Rims (Buchanan) but I bent that one too!

  • rickallen124

Posted June 01, 2011 - 12:09 PM

#18

DID STX or Excel A60.

  • motojase316

Posted June 01, 2011 - 03:53 PM

#19

I think the stock Yamaha Hub with correct Maintenance and inspections are nearly bullet proof.
I am Running talon Hubs along with a lot of others and they are tuff as!!
But still only as strong as poor maintenance lets them be. One of my regular riding buddies never checks anything and ran with loose bolts on his new talon hubs... Boom!!!

  • Moto Andy

Posted June 01, 2011 - 10:02 PM

#20

You may need a new decorator. Myler's Radiator Repair has never had a problem reconstructing YZ radiators.


Cotters are far too soft. The pins need to be hardened steel dowels that look somewhat like roller bearings, or spring steel roll pins at the least. The problem with the pinning scheme here is locating a spot on the hub flange that is both far enough from the bolt holes and in an area of the flange where there is an adequate amount of material for the drilling.

A third method along the same lines is to drill the hub flange to accept steel doweling sleeves that will extend into enlarged mounting holes in the sprocket.

So what actually holds the sleeves in? Would you flare out the ends like a copper water line connection basically? My neighbor was saying just tack weld the head of the bolts to the sprocket, hick yes but it would work haha.
And i don't remember what shop i took the rads too over in Mtn View, but it was recommended by a few people. Two rads, holes in both the fins in the body of the rad. Opposite sides. I dunno i'm happy with my fluidynes now.

I think you need to slow down and stop wreaking bikes . As for the rads, find another welder. There is nothing "inferior" about the OEM rad material. I had a very small crack at the base of the tank, the AWS boiler code welders at my work did a fantastic repair job.... yes I agree the OEM rads are very expensive and bend easy, it's the nature of the beast when you are striving to shave ounces of weight off a bikes' chassis. The easiest route is to simply make components from thinner material This is why I got Moose rad braces after my first YZF lowside.


Probably, but slowing down is lame, and i'm not wrecking bikes, i've had my 07 for 3 years now, it's just the same parts keep breaking or bending. I beg to differ about the metal used in the rads, it's not the best product, it's cost cutting by accountants pot metal, that is weaker which is one reason they bend easier. That is also why they sell it for so much money because they know your going to bend them, it's called planned obsolescence.

You don't know how fast you can go if you aren't crashing. I had also put flatland braces on bent those an the rad. Cracked a couple ribs on that one but oh well. Nature of the beast haha. To me ounces me nothing when you have a bike with as much power as these are putting out. Especially in the radiators seeing as there is no centrifugal drag or any drag for that matter slowing the bike down.

Another question, strongest hand guards? Moose also?





Related Content

Forums
Photo

2016 YZ450 by CaptainKnobby


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Technical Forums   Suspension
  • Hot  59 replies
Forums
Photo

First Hare scramble tips by dhend8


Dirt Bike   General Dirt Bike Forums   General Dirt Bike Discussion
  • Hot  33 replies
Forums
Photo

James Stewart back on a YZ450F by YamaLink


Dirt Bike   Special Interest Forums   Pro Racing
  • Hot  47 replies
Wiki
WR Camshaft Swap Info - last post by jamesm113

WR Camshaft Swap Info


Articles
  • 0 replies
Forums
Photo

100 hrs on 2014 yz450f, shim valves or replace them? by ttr230rider6


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Yamaha   YZ 400/426/450
  • Hot  79 replies
 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.