11 years, 325ccs, 5 valves later...


44 replies to this topic
  • crf450319

Posted May 19, 2011 - 08:15 AM

#21

I remember when i 1st started riding big Yamaha 4 strokes and how hard they were to start...until i learned 1 thing...NEVER touch the gas when starting them. At least none of the 426's or 450's ive ridden.


That doesn't apply to my '09 yz450f. Before my first ride at the track I always twist the throttle to the stop 3 times before kicking. Makes starting it cold much easier.

I wouldn't think that would be a good idea when the bike is hot/warm, but works like a charm when it's cold.

:smirk:

  • grayracer513

Posted May 19, 2011 - 08:26 AM

#22

Wouldnt holding the throttle wide open flood it even more?

With the throttle open wide, no intake vacuum is generated, so apart from the single squirt RiderX mentioned, no gas is raised through the jets and none runs into the carb. Turning it through this way pumps air only through the hot engine to carry off the evaporating excess of fuel.

On '05 and later models equipped with leak jets, you can even prevent most of the squirt from happening by opening the throttle slowly. Doing that will run most of the pump discharge out the leak jet instead of into the throat.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 19, 2011 - 08:34 AM

#23

Before my first ride at the track I always twist the throttle to the stop 3 times before kicking. Makes starting it cold much easier.

I wouldn't think that would be a good idea when the bike is hot/warm, but works like a charm when it's cold.

If it's less than 60 degrees out, that makes cold starting my '06 possible, not easier. You don't prime that bike, and you'll get all of the day's exercise right next to the truck. :smirk:

And you're right; it's a really bad idea when the engine is hot. :smirk:

There are those in between times, though, when the bike has cooled some, but not cooled down, when either the choke OR a quick squirt gets it going right away.

  • johnny6speed

Posted May 19, 2011 - 08:57 AM

#24

2 hours on it so far counting this morning before work. Used the 3 wide open throttle cracks/cold start pull/method and it started 4th kick. Adjusted the idle speed a bit higher, lugs a bit better.

Going to move the bars forward when I get home tonight. Gotta figure out some adjustment with the shifter, having trouble with my size 14 boot getting underneath it comfortably.

Dropped my tire pressure down to 11lbs from 15. Made a huge difference in my slippery, muddy field up here.

I'm going to pick up some running board/skateboard tape this afternoon to apply to the frame and bottom edge of the shrouds. Right now there is NO WAY I can hold on to this thing with my legs at all with my current pants and knee pads. Its a greased pig. Any other suggestions?

Lastly, I need some padded underdraughs ASAP. My man parts and underside "area" are sore as hell. :smirk:

  • crf450319

Posted May 19, 2011 - 09:09 AM

#25

If it's less than 60 degrees out, that makes cold starting my '06 possible, not easier. You don't prime that bike, and you'll get all of the day's exercise right next to the truck. :prof:

And you're right; it's a really bad idea when the engine is hot. :smirk:

There are those in between times, though, when the bike has cooled some, but not cooled down, when either the choke OR a quick squirt gets it going right away.


It's been 60 to 68 deg. f here for the past few weeks, without 3 twists I've got to kick usually 6 to 10 times and with the "prime" It's usually 2 or 3 :smirk:

That's just how it is with mine...

  • Polar_Bus

Posted May 19, 2011 - 12:38 PM

#26

Lastly, I need some padded underdraughs ASAP. My man parts and underside "area" are sore as hell. :smirk:


Yamaha has made some BRUTALLY hard seats over the past years. My 07 actually seems plush from past seats. As for your sweaty, swollen junk, a wad of vasoline between the cheeks, and properly vented pants makes for a happy day :smirk: !

  • grayracer513

Posted May 19, 2011 - 12:59 PM

#27

Yamaha has made some BRUTALLY hard seats over the past years.

In China, the national railway system has different classes of seating available, like airlines do. The super econo class is called "YZ", and it means "hard seats".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_seat

No known connection.:smirk:

Food for thought: American Brad Lackey went to the CZ Factory training grounds in Czechoslovakia in 1971 to learn how to do it like the Europeans do. One morning the team mechanics rolled the bikes out, filled them with gas, and removed the seats. The CZ's held 2.7 gallons, and they were told to ride them until they ran out. :smirk:

  • johnny6speed

Posted May 19, 2011 - 01:12 PM

#28

Food for thought: American Brad Lackey went to the CZ Factory training grounds in Czechoslovakia in 1971 to learn how to do it like the Europeans do. One morning the team mechanics rolled the bikes out, filled them with gas, and removed the seats. The CZ's held 2.7 gallons, and they were told to ride them until they ran out. :smirk:


Gave me a good chuckle. I grabbed some running board grip tape from a local autoparts store while on lunch. I certainly need to condition myself to holding on more with my lower body.

  • Polar_Bus

Posted May 20, 2011 - 02:09 AM

#29

Gave me a good chuckle. I grabbed some running board grip tape from a local autoparts store while on lunch. I certainly need to condition myself to holding on more with my lower body.


Back when I was first learning how to CORRECTLY ride, a friend who was a wise old farmer who's son was a 15 year old A 100cc rider at the time helped me with a core fundemental skill of balance and braking. He took the seat off my RM100 and told me to ride all day. To make matters even worse, he also removed my rear brake lever. Since that day of learning, I don't think i've ever replaced a rear set of brake pads.. LOL But it tought me a basic necessary motocross skill :smirk: "get your a$$ off the seat, and hard on the front brakes, gentlly steer with the rear brakes"

  • crf450319

Posted May 20, 2011 - 06:32 AM

#30

Back when I was first learning how to CORRECTLY ride, a friend who was a wise old farmer who's son was a 15 year old A 100cc rider at the time helped me with a core fundemental skill of balance and braking. He took the seat off my RM100 and told me to ride all day. To make matters even worse, he also removed my rear brake lever. Since that day of learning, I don't think i've ever replaced a rear set of brake pads.. LOL But it tought me a basic necessary motocross skill :smirk: "get your a$$ off the seat, and hard on the front brakes, gentlly steer with the rear brakes"


I was out with my 5 year old on his KTM, he was in a flat field riding around in an oval. He knows he's supposed to stand up & squeeze the bike with his knees but he'd ride right past me sitting down, ignoring my calls to stand up. I stopped him on his next lap, had him shut the bike off and started taking his seat off. He asked what I was doing & I told him that he was sitting too much. He said that he'd stand if he could have his seat...

All I've got to do now is mention that his seat will come off if he doesn't stand - especially over small jumps.

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  • johnny6speed

Posted May 20, 2011 - 09:43 PM

#31

Added some grip tape this evening along with moving the bars forward. Adjustments feel good on the stand, after a few hours of work tomorrow morning, I'm heading to a local riding area (tracks not open yet due to extreme wet weather) to try em out. Pardon the garbage cellphone pic.

Posted Image

  • Polar_Bus

Posted May 21, 2011 - 02:53 AM

#32

Added some grip tape this evening along with moving the bars forward. Adjustments feel good on the stand, after a few hours of work tomorrow morning, I'm heading to a local riding area (tracks not open yet due to extreme wet weather) to try em out. Pardon the garbage cellphone pic.

Posted Image


You ride at MX207 ?

  • johnny6speed

Posted May 21, 2011 - 05:58 AM

#33

You ride at MX207 ?


Not yet Polar Bus, I plan on it though. My goal is to putt around for a few laps on all the tracks in Maine this year.

  • JRide6

Posted May 21, 2011 - 06:09 AM

#34

:smirk: Awesome post! Congrats on the new ride! :smirk:

  • DPW

Posted May 22, 2011 - 05:07 AM

#35

Size 14 boots do not work with out of crate shift/brake lever settings


should help>> http://www.hdmoto.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=YZF450SLR

and while you are at it>>>http://www.yamaha-mo...5/0/detail.aspx

  • Polar_Bus

Posted May 22, 2011 - 05:57 AM

#36

Not yet Polar Bus, I plan on it though. My goal is to putt around for a few laps on all the tracks in Maine this year.


If your just starting out first time at the track head over to 207 on a practice wednesday. Get there right at opening, and you will have the whole track to yourself. 207 gets busy around mid afternoon. wednesday's are usually very light as far as riders

  • johnny6speed

Posted May 22, 2011 - 05:21 PM

#37

Thanks for the link on that shifter DPW. I'll order it later on for sure.

Took the afternoon off from work yesterday only to deal with this when I got to my riding spot.

Posted Image

:smirk::banghead::prof:

I kicked back in my truck for an hour and 20 mins reading my owners manual and messing around on my phone. Once the rain stopped the trails were fairly sketchy. Lots of hidden roots/rocks in pools, and ultra slippery conditions. In 2.5 hours of riding I flamed out at least 15 times. I am going to INSTA-order that gytr off-road flywheel tomorrow morning(supporting my dealership). Thanks for the link DPW. I did find my clutch control improving rapidly the more my right leg and hip barked at me.

Standing up still doesn't feel natural. But, I know its gotta be a mental and muscle conditioning thing. And/Or I need to move the bars to the forward position in the clamps instead of just tipping them forward a few mms. I'm not sure if the OEM setup is good for my 5,11ish frame. Standing, the difference in control is HUGE, when in the soft stuff, it was exciting to feel the difference between sitting and standing, I felt my stress level going down significantly.

A little under 5 hours on the bike so far. Interesting psychology going on too. Before and during the ride, I am careful and slightly nervous. But, the longer I ride it the more comfortable I feel. Then when I load the bike back in the truck I feel like a million bucks and am anxious for the next ride! :smirk:

I am anxious for the (*@#(*H( rain to stop and more local riding areas and tracks to open up. My springs should be in tuesday so I'll get them in this week, then, once set properly for my weight, I am excited to feel the difference.

  • Bobbed06

Posted May 22, 2011 - 08:24 PM

#38

Heres what I may do to my YZ450 handlebars.

http://www.barrisers...rdrisers78.html

Whats the scoop on the Hammerhead shifters?? They say out of stock. I am gonna be snagging a plus 10mm long for my size 11 boots.

  • Polar_Bus

Posted May 23, 2011 - 02:14 AM

#39

Thanks for the link on that shifter DPW. I'll order it later on for sure.

Took the afternoon off from work yesterday only to deal with this when I got to my riding spot.

Posted Image

:smirk::banghead::prof:

I kicked back in my truck for an hour and 20 mins reading my owners manual and messing around on my phone. Once the rain stopped the trails were fairly sketchy. Lots of hidden roots/rocks in pools, and ultra slippery conditions. In 2.5 hours of riding I flamed out at least 15 times. I am going to INSTA-order that gytr off-road flywheel tomorrow morning(supporting my dealership). Thanks for the link DPW. I did find my clutch control improving rapidly the more my right leg and hip barked at me.

Standing up still doesn't feel natural. But, I know its gotta be a mental and muscle conditioning thing. And/Or I need to move the bars to the forward position in the clamps instead of just tipping them forward a few mms. I'm not sure if the OEM setup is good for my 5,11ish frame. Standing, the difference in control is HUGE, when in the soft stuff, it was exciting to feel the difference between sitting and standing, I felt my stress level going down significantly.

A little under 5 hours on the bike so far. Interesting psychology going on too. Before and during the ride, I am careful and slightly nervous. But, the longer I ride it the more comfortable I feel. Then when I load the bike back in the truck I feel like a million bucks and am anxious for the next ride! :smirk:

I am anxious for the (*@#(*H( rain to stop and more local riding areas and tracks to open up. My springs should be in tuesday so I'll get them in this week, then, once set properly for my weight, I am excited to feel the difference.


When the temps fall below say 55F you might find that a richer pilot jet will help minimise the low speed stalling (if in fact your bike is jetted stock). I have a richer pilot in my '07 and it made a huge difference in overall low speed drivability in cooler temps. These YZ's come jetted slightly lean across the rpm range, and colder New England air aggravates the lean condition even more. The reason you have better control standing is while standing you are carrying a very low center of gravity, and the chassis reacts very quickly to the riders input. When you are sitting on the seat, now you are carrying a high center of gravity and the chassis reacts very slowly to your inputs. if you're negitiating technical slippery terrain, be standing , be easy on the gas, and stay loose and let the bike "bounce" don't try to fight the bikes chassis, let the suspension do it's job. As you gain confidence and speed you will begin to realize the more speed you carry over technical bumpy terrain, the smoother your bike takes the bumps. Keep at it !

  • johnny6speed

Posted May 23, 2011 - 10:43 AM

#40

OEM jetting here Polar Bus. Oh, using the pull cold start lever/3 wot tugs method, it started first kick this morning before work!!! My right leg is getting stronger already :smirk:





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