48mm (05) forks on 03 wr 450??


12 replies to this topic
  • ofgofg

Posted April 19, 2011 - 09:32 AM

#1

One of my 03 wr 450s has rebuilt forks, has "silver?" springs. Almost no travel up front! Perhaps too much fork oil? I dont know. Anyway, I have a chance to buy a very nice set of 05 forks and triple clamps for 125 bucks. Is there anything else that needs changed if I swap out to the 05 forks? Brake lines? Fork guards?

Just trying to take advantage of a potentially less expensive alternative to having my stock forks reworked. Plus, it would be cool to have a spare set off a bike to mess with at my own leisure.

Thanks!

  • pdunlop

Posted April 19, 2011 - 02:28 PM

#2

If you go for the 05 forks then you will find that they are missing the groove in the lower leg where the 03/04 brake hose goes below the axle. The fork guards are different too, catering for the later model brake line routing.

The easy fix for that would be to also get the later model (05 onwards) brake line and fork guards. If you wanted to reuse the old forks, you also can get a 'conversion' fork guard clamp for the 03/04 guards to suit the later model brake hose - that way you can swap forks/clamps back and forth without having to change the brake line each time.

If you do go for the newer brake line configuration, you should probably also add a small bracket to the rear of the brake caliper to retain the line - look at the brake caliper on an 05 parts fische for an example.

Edited by pdunlop, April 19, 2011 - 02:48 PM.


  • ofgofg

Posted April 20, 2011 - 07:05 AM

#3

going to see if I can get the whole package then, fork guards, and brake line.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted April 20, 2011 - 11:28 AM

#4

Even after you make this switch, you will notice very little difference in suspension performance. I think that the older style forks can be tuned perfectly. The 05 forks will also need to be tuned and revalved. You'll end up in the same place, but will have spent more money.

Just sayin...

  • ofgofg

Posted April 22, 2011 - 09:37 AM

#5

Right now my stock forks are waaaayyyy to stiff. Almost unuseable. I priced a set of springs at 200 bucks and a 10 day wait. Going to get these 05 parts today for a total of 150 bucks. This will put my wr at more of a "factory stock" setting or feeling I guess. Planning on finding a set of good used springs for the stock forks. Going to try and rework them myself. That all takes time. With the 05 parts,, I will be riding this week end.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted April 22, 2011 - 03:14 PM

#6

Good luck. I hope it works out.

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  • ofgofg

Posted April 22, 2011 - 03:48 PM

#7

HMMM,,, went to swap forks today. Got stuck on the top nut on the tripple clamps, and the front axle nut. Those 2 would not budge. So, I swapped springs, and sucked a little bit of fluid out of each leg. Front end is a little better now, but not where it needs to be. Very frustrating because these 48mm yz forks are smooth and plush.

Oh well, I got the wr back together, and it is a little better now,, good enough for riding this week end!

  • ofgofg

Posted April 22, 2011 - 06:19 PM

#8

I lucked out; replacement forks are 46mm. Now I just have to figure out how to unstuck the axle nut!

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted April 22, 2011 - 11:30 PM

#9

I lucked out; replacement forks are 46mm. Now I just have to figure out how to unstuck the axle nut!


Wait.... are you putting on 48mm forks or not? I don't understand.

If you swapped springs, where did you get them from?

Be careful about draining too much fluid from the forks. I hope you measured and are at least at the minimum level. What do you weigh? On my wr450, which is an 05, I run higher oil levels and use some air cell cannisters on the forks. They feel pretty good in the rocky single track.

that top nut is torqued to 105lbs. that's a lot. You will need a breaker bar. When I remove mine, which I do to grease the bearing, I stand in front of the bike and put my left foot on the right foot peg. Then I can have some leverage as I pull on the breaker bar, which is about 18 inches. Don't use your torque wrench as a breaker bar.

  • ofgofg

Posted April 23, 2011 - 07:09 AM

#10

No on the 48 mm forks. The kid I bought them from said they came off an 05 yz 450. Mabey they did...However, upon inspection and measuring, they are in fact 46mm. So, while trying to take apart my front end, I got stuck on the axle nut and the top clamp nut. Realizing I could not do the swap, I decided to try swapping springs. I did this, reassembled, and slight change was noted. So, I once again removed my fork caps, blocked up the rear end and lifted on my bike lift so the forks were as close to straight up as I could manage. I then used a pencil to measure oil depth. One leg was at 5.25 inches, the other at about 4.125". I uses a long piece of clear tubing to remove some oil, and make the levels match a little closer. Then,, remove rear end blocks, lift the whole bike again,,, re install springs and fork caps, re install handle bars,,,Whew!

Results are slightly better. Its hard to determine whats a proper setting. My supermoto bike has a well matched suspension. Both ends squish pretty equally, and neither end seems more harsh than the other.

This dirt bike is different. The rear shock seems normal,, a bit soft for 200 pounds of rider, but very usable,, because i like a soft ride anyway.. The front end is however, a bit harsh, and when I get on the bike, it does not sag as much as the rear. So, while riding, it handles badly, the rear end seems to wallow, because the front end gives up almost nothing. That was before my little wrench session anyway. I still need to ride again and see if the changes were for the better.

  • ofgofg

Posted April 23, 2011 - 07:13 AM

#11

So, I ended up buying tripple clamps and brake assembly from the same guy,, all for less than a set of new springs! Anybody need the Tclamps and front brake? They are definitely from a 46mm fork set up.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted April 23, 2011 - 08:49 AM

#12

No on the 48 mm forks. The kid I bought them from said they came off an 05 yz 450. Mabey they did...However, upon inspection and measuring, they are in fact 46mm. So, while trying to take apart my front end, I got stuck on the axle nut and the top clamp nut. Realizing I could not do the swap, I decided to try swapping springs. I did this, reassembled, and slight change was noted. So, I once again removed my fork caps, blocked up the rear end and lifted on my bike lift so the forks were as close to straight up as I could manage. I then used a pencil to measure oil depth. One leg was at 5.25 inches, the other at about 4.125". I uses a long piece of clear tubing to remove some oil, and make the levels match a little closer. Then,, remove rear end blocks, lift the whole bike again,,, re install springs and fork caps, re install handle bars,,,Whew!

Results are slightly better. Its hard to determine whats a proper setting. My supermoto bike has a well matched suspension. Both ends squish pretty equally, and neither end seems more harsh than the other.

This dirt bike is different. The rear shock seems normal,, a bit soft for 200 pounds of rider, but very usable,, because i like a soft ride anyway.. The front end is however, a bit harsh, and when I get on the bike, it does not sag as much as the rear. So, while riding, it handles badly, the rear end seems to wallow, because the front end gives up almost nothing. That was before my little wrench session anyway. I still need to ride again and see if the changes were for the better.



Now I am understanding. I don't know what the stock springs are. But, I would think that the stock spring in a wr450 would be heavier than a yz450. There is a 30lb difference between those bikes. You really need to know what size springs you are putting on.

Just changing out springs and removing a bit of oil probably won't get you dialed in.

1. cut down on the guess work and follow the process for dialing in your suspension. WR450's need this really desperately. You should be hanging out in the suspension forum. you'll get better advice.

2. start with the sag. Research and find the proper procedure for setting the sag. Without this being right, the bike will not turn at all. This will force you to lookup and get the proper springs for your bike. Go to racetech.com and use their spring calculator.

3. set your oil height back to stock level.

4. look in your service manual and go back to your baseline settings (stock) on the clickers.

5. follow the procedure in the service manual about dialing in your clickers (compression and rebound adjusters). They are there for a reason and will make a difference.

Take good notes on what works and what doesn't work and then post these notes and observations in the suspension forum.

  • ofgofg

Posted April 23, 2011 - 01:45 PM

#13

Before messing with the swap I had gone through the procedures for adjusting the damping, and had put them at stock settings. This was still too hard. So, I adjusted the compression all the way soft. Still too hard. Best I can tell is that one or both legs had too much oil. Bleeding the air didnt help either.

Now, today I have completed the swap. Went to auto parts store and got a 22mm 6 point socket to get the axle nut off. Was very careful to install the replacement fork tubes absolutely level, and got the bottom pieces absolutely straight lined up on the axle.

Its too rainy to ride, but the new used fork feels much better. Its actually got some travel. I will take the stock fork in to a shop and see whats up with them. The previous owner had indicated he was trying to get max height from the suspension, because he was tall. I am wondering if something was done internally to accommodate, or perhaps heavier oil was used. Anyway,,, I know my method is less than perfect,, but it still stands,, better front end feel, and now I can have the stock fork serviced at my leisure.




 
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