Coolant leak with start up


25 replies to this topic
  • brentn

Posted April 20, 2011 - 12:19 PM

#21

The trail tech will confirm if you're overheating, and when the coolant reaches a certain temp it will exit through the rad cap at whatever pressure the cap is designed to release. The coolant temp IMO should never go over 100 or so degree's, it should hover around 80-90 and just under 100 for the rough stuff. But if your doing alot of high speed riding, and it's still overheating it totally sounds like a blown head gasket.
Pretty normal to have a little boil over on long tight stretches though..

  • 2can

Posted April 20, 2011 - 12:30 PM

#22

I really appreciate the insight and help. Thanks

  • grayracer513

Posted April 20, 2011 - 01:37 PM

#23

What the Trail Tech won't do is check for an excess of pressure in the cooling system due to a leaking head gasket.

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  • Jonbikes

Posted April 20, 2011 - 08:29 PM

#24

You're coolant will likely be running more in the 200 degree Celsius range than the sub 100c range. Under normal atmospheric pressure water boils at 98 degrees or somewhere in and around there (lets just say 100 to make things easy). Under the 16 pounds of pressure that your rad cap causes the rad to build with the heat of the engine, the coolant is able to refrain from boiling up to say 250 degrees.

I'm more of a car mechanic so I'm not entirely sure of temperatures on these bikes, but it is certainly not uncommon for a vehicle with an aluminum block to run in the range of 200 or higher, no problem.

Either way you shouldn't be loosing that much coolant...time to look at the possibility of a blown head gasket or some other leaking gasket or something. However, if you don't have a drip, check the head gasket first.

  • grayracer513

Posted April 20, 2011 - 08:53 PM

#25

You're coolant will likely be running more in the 200 degree Celsius range than the sub 100c range. ...

I'm more of a car mechanic so I'm not entirely sure of temperatures on these bikes, but it is certainly not uncommon for a vehicle with an aluminum block to run in the range of 200 or higher, no problem.


Do you understand that 200 degrees Celsius is 392 ℉ ? Under no circumstance will your coolant ever be that hot unless you're running straight Evans coolant. The Celsius scale is based on the freezing and boiling point of water at sea level, so 0 ℃ is freezing, and, curiously enough, 100 ℃ is boiling (that's 212 ℉), not 98.

The stock cap is 1.1 bar, which is close enough to 16 psi to call it that. Under that pressure, a 50/50 coolant/water mix boils at around 265 ℉ (129 ℃). The engine can handle that temperature just fine, but boiling coolant doesn't cool, so wherever it boils is where the line has to be drawn. But without a thermostat, it's completely normal for the bike in motion to run at 140 ℉ (60 ℃) or less.

  • Jonbikes

Posted April 21, 2011 - 03:09 AM

#26

Perhaps I need to double check which scale automotive thermostats are sold in, degrees F or C. My apologies if they are the opposite of what I had said.

Edit.... Yup, just looked er up and I had my wires crossed, automotive thermostats are sold in the Fahrenheit scale.





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