strongest final drive chain?


13 replies to this topic
  • Lcpl0331

Posted March 30, 2011 - 05:53 PM

#1

I go thru chains pretty fast. I ride anywhere from 1500 to 2000 dirt miles a year. I check my slack all the time since I know I stretch chains.. What is the absolute best/strongest chain I can get? I run Ironman sprockets and they have lasted me a season and a half so far without much sign of wear. Well the rear anyway. I replaced the front half way thru last year but that's was cause I'm a bit anal about such things.
It was still in ok shape but the chain issue has me concerned so it had to go.
About how many miles should I get out of a decent chain?
Thanks

  • bg10459

Posted March 30, 2011 - 07:34 PM

#2

I've had a Regina ORN6 on my WR450 for three seasons and an ORS6 on my YZ250 for two. The ORN has more than 7600 lbs tensile strength and the ORS has more than 7900 lbs. Had I not gotten a great deal on the ORS, I would have bought another ORN because it's cheaper and still really good. The Regina GPZ is their strongest 520 chain at more than 8000 lbs, but it's more than twice the price of an ORN6.

  • ARin

Posted March 30, 2011 - 08:29 PM

#3

a properly adjusted chain should last a LOT longer than that. dont use the "3 finger method". there are good tutorials for proper chain adjustment. i just went on a ride with 70+ people, and probably 90% of them had TERRIBLY tight chains.

  • Shred Jesse

Posted March 30, 2011 - 10:36 PM

#4

I wonder if you could fit 530 sprockets and chain on a WR400/426/450. It would probably last forever, and add to the grunt of the bike for sure.

  • XLR8RR

Posted March 30, 2011 - 11:56 PM

#5

Check out these Sidewinder chains:
They must be good. These XP chains are only $230... wow...
They have two other chains also - "Titanium II" & "SmartChain II"
Chain with a brain..... okay....? sure.. Posted Image
[COLOR="Red"]http://www.sidewindersprockets.com/xp_extreme_performance_chain.html[/COLOR]
"Krause/Sidewinder has develpoed a special limited production chain exclusively reserved for
extreme horsepower applications such as 300 ft, 1/8, 1/4, mile drags; Dune Dragsters and
Frankenstien Quads with monster street engines; Fat -Tire Hayabusas; Big street bike 520
conversion kits; Hillclimbers with NOS and other extended swingarm, Fire-Breathing beasts. This
chain is called "Extreme Performance XP" limited edition chain. This chain is available with or
without SR-51 "Smart Rings"in Double Gold only. Tensile strength exceeds 17,000 lbs. Almost
double anything else made."


  • miweber929

Posted March 31, 2011 - 04:33 AM

#6

I wonder if you could fit 530 sprockets and chain on a WR400/426/450. It would probably last forever, and add to the grunt of the bike for sure.

How would adding a heavier chain and sprockets add the the grunt of a bike? that makes NO sense what so ever.

It's not the tensile strength that ruins chains (for the most part) as a 520 works very nicely on my 160 HP CBR1000RR it's adjustments and maintenance. A 50 hp dirtbike should not stretch a proper chain at all.

Not enough lube is bad, to much lube is almost worse. Too loose is bad, too tight is worse.

You get what you pay for when it comes to chains, end of story. Sand and dirt are your enemy. And if you are not changing them all together you will affect the life of the chain. And a too small front sprocket kills them as well along with bad chain guides.

  • bg10459

Posted March 31, 2011 - 04:45 AM

#7

It's not the tensile strength that ruins chains (for the most part) as a 520 works very nicely on my 160 HP CBR1000RR....

While I don't disagree about maintenence and adjustment, and the 1000RR certainly has a stronger pull, I don't think street bikes see the same impact loading that dirt bikes do. I liken it to climbing rope; it's not the heaviest climber who breaks the rope, but the one who falls the furthest.

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  • Lcpl0331

Posted March 31, 2011 - 05:54 PM

#8

thanks for the replies. I should be all set now. got an ors6 chain and cut a new measuring block as the old one was getting chewed up. I have the slack at an inch and 3/4 measured from the rear bolt on the slider. I checked the slack every couple inches the entire length of the chain and it's all good.

  • byggd

Posted April 01, 2011 - 01:48 PM

#9

Have you tried a Primary Drive chain from RM? You can spend more but you won't find a better chain IMO.

  • ARin

Posted April 01, 2011 - 02:14 PM

#10

thanks for the replies. I should be all set now. got an ors6 chain and cut a new measuring block as the old one was getting chewed up. I have the slack at an inch and 3/4 measured from the rear bolt on the slider. I checked the slack every couple inches the entire length of the chain and it's all good.


use a ratchet strap through the rear rim, and over your subframe...ratchet it down until the rear swingarm is LEVEL with the floor. (about half compressed). then check your slack.

this is the point where the chain will be the TIGHTEST in the arc of the swingarm. there must be some slack at this point.

  • Lcpl0331

Posted April 01, 2011 - 05:51 PM

#11

Never heard that one before. I'll try it and see where I'm at

  • MrBlahh

Posted April 01, 2011 - 06:15 PM

#12

all steel sprockets

  • MANIAC998

Posted April 02, 2011 - 06:33 AM

#13

ARin is right! That's exactly how I check my chain tension, except I pull the lower shock bolt while the bike sits on the bike stand and just raise the rear tire up in the air using my perfect height toolbox, which places the swingarm level. This is the tightest spot of chain tension during the arc of suspension travel, and in my opinion, the only correct way to check chain tension. Maniac

  • ARin

Posted April 02, 2011 - 12:40 PM

#14

yup, if you are bowstring tight at this point in the suspension travel, you are going to go through sprockets and chains way faster than normal...and in the worst case scenario, blow out your countersprocket bearing.




 
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