2010 450 breather re-route, check this out!


34 replies to this topic
  • brentn

Posted March 27, 2011 - 01:20 PM

#1

Pretty stoked on how well this went, how good it looks, and how discrete it is!

Got in a fight with the girlfriend so I went out and decided that today would be a good day to get some stuff done to the bike that I've been meaning to do for a while now.
Went to the local autovalue and grabbed a few things, had to go to home depot for most of it but in the end I bought some goodies for a breather re-route.
The 2010 breather, like previous years, will suck up dirt in the right conditions, I have proof of it when I checked my valves here;
Posted Image
Above is a photo of the underside of the cam cover and the PCV flange. Clearly there is dirt, small amounts but dirt none-the-less. Nothing new to learn here but since I saw it with my own eyes on my own bike that I adore, I did some reading on what I could do.
I found that the best way to re-route the tube is to T it off in which you can have an area for oil to collect in which it will not clog your PCV filter, and an area for the filter itself. I had seen quite a few pics of ones inside the air box, but since the 2010 airbox is so small I couldn't fit the filter that I bought anywhere inside it. Doing some thinking I came up with a good way to do this in which the PCV filter is high enough to stay out of the water/mud, and a low point for oil to collect, and a way to see that oil had collected in which it could be drained out. I also wanted to utilize the stock hose as it has bends and mounts already, and trying to bend bought hose can cause kinks, and can get really frustrating trying to route.

Here's what I bought
Posted Image
Most expensive part was the PCV filter at about 28$!!! It was the smallest I could find too, I wanted to go smaller but no dice locally here... It'll still work though. The fittings were about 1$ each and the hose about 4$ total. I used 1/2" fittings as they were widely available in the plumbing department and they were fairly close to the I.D. of the PCV tube on the bike. The clamps were about 30cents each and the T was about 2$. Total price was pretty good at about 40$. This can be done for less, I just couldn't find a cheaper filter, and the fittings I wanted in PVC plastic but I could not find 1/2" ID that small, only in copper/brass.

Here is how I rigged up my oil collection tube and sight tube for the base of the stock hose
Posted Image
The clear hose was used for a sight to see if oil had collected, I used a small copper plug (1/2") with a clamp on the end of the hose. When the hose collects oil and I can see it, I can release the clamp and drain. I could not find a valve that was small enough, all the valves were rather large even with 1/2" fittings and looked like crap, I wanted to make this as clean and discrete as possible. Below is a picture of the plug
Posted Image

Now I had to fit the T fitting in a spot that would not have my new hose for my filter kink or bend too much, so I eye balled it, made some markings and did some cutting and found the perfect spot.
Posted Image
Here is a better view of were exactly this is located on the bike
Posted Image


I tried dicking around with the filter on the right side, seeing if there was a way to mount it but there was just no room. On the left side of the bike, behind the top of the left rad, behind the lower fairing was the perfect spot. Lots of room and hidden!
Posted Image
Here is the filter behind the plastic, PERFECT spot!!
Posted Image

I used a zip tie to mount it to the plastic, trying to keep it from falling out and/or banging on the rad fins. I chose to buy fuel injection hose because it was thicker, and it was less flexible, again I didn't want any kinks to develop in the system. The hose was 3/8 and the fittings are 1/2" for a really tight fit. So tight that I had to heat up and grease the hose to get it on the fitting.



Pretty clean setup, I'm doing some other work so I couldn't start the bike and check it but I see no reason why this wouldn't work well. No more dirt in my cam cover or water in my oil ever again!
Tell me what you think, or if you see any problems, please let me know.

  • Gunner354

Posted March 28, 2011 - 09:43 AM

#2

I probably would have used plastic fittings and zip ties.
It just amazes me that Yamaha does not use the wr air box with side access and the breather tube as part of the airbox.

  • brentn

Posted March 28, 2011 - 03:08 PM

#3

I guess MX bikes just don't need it.

I would have used plastic, but they didn't have any plastic fittings for 1/2". I couldn't believe it, autovalue, totem and home depot did not have 1/2". Everything was too small or way too big in plastic. Otherwise, yes I would have used plastic for sure.

  • grayracer513

Posted March 28, 2011 - 03:18 PM

#4

I would have used plastic, but they didn't have any plastic fittings for 1/2".

From Yamaha: 90413-14001-00 (3 way "T") .

  • wrxmxer

Posted March 28, 2011 - 06:35 PM

#5

Polaris Fuel and Oil Filter 2530009 (google image search)

I use one of these in the sand. I knock of the fittings on the ends and just insert into the end of the breather hose and zip tie. Perfect fit.

  • brentn

Posted March 28, 2011 - 06:35 PM

#6

Is there a part number for a straight through coupler?

Thanks alot for that part!!!

What would you recommend for a plug?

  • grayracer513

Posted March 28, 2011 - 07:10 PM

#7

There's no need of a plug or a straight connector. With a T, the strength of the vacuum assuming free air in both the run back to the air box and down run is cut to half that of the line leaving the cam box, for starters.

Beyond that, if something heavy, like water or dirt enters the down run, air will take the path of least resistance and enter the engine through the air box line instead, spoiling the lift the water or debris has. The down line will then drain by itself, and the "sight glass" is unnecessary.

  • brentn

Posted March 28, 2011 - 07:37 PM

#8

Sounds like I might re-work it then.
I just didn't want to have any possible chance of un-filtered air entering the system. This is why I plugged the end to make sure that air is drawn in and out through the filter and not an open line.

  • Mr. Neutron

Posted March 28, 2011 - 08:07 PM

#9

Brent, will water be able to make it to your little filter behind your radiator when you wash your bike?

Jimmie

  • grayracer513

Posted March 29, 2011 - 07:01 AM

#10

Brent, will water be able to make it to your little filter behind your radiator when you wash your bike?

Jimmie

The answer to that is yes.

Also keep in mind that the air box in the '06-'09 bikes is an exceptionally dusty place, so if you route there, use a filter and plan on servicing it frequently.

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  • Hooch33

Posted March 29, 2011 - 08:25 AM

#11

The answer to that is yes.

Also keep in mind that the air box in the '06-'09 bikes is an exceptionally dusty place, so if you route there, use a filter and plan on servicing it frequently.


I really wouldn't think it would be any less dusty than the original location unfiltered behind the rear wheel.

  • Mr. Neutron

Posted March 29, 2011 - 10:37 AM

#12

Hmmmm. I guess I was trying to make a point that might've been missed.....

To me, Brent's re-route job, however well intentioned it is, may not do as he'd hoped. Most of us are trying to keep water/mud/dust/sand from inadvertently being slurpped up through the breather ("Puke Tube" as we call 'em.... :cheers: ). If his filter is put somewhere where water from a hose (when washing) can get to it, what keeps water from a track, mudhole, water crossing, from getting to it?

I honestly don't know where I would run it, if I had a 2010 model. I'd like to make some constructive help, rather than simply sit back & make critical comments. But again, I wonder how much is gained by placing the filter there????

Jimmie

  • Hooch33

Posted March 29, 2011 - 10:51 AM

#13

Safest place is to the airbox

  • Mr. Neutron

Posted March 29, 2011 - 11:00 AM

#14

Is it possible to do that on a 2010? Their airbox is up where the fuel tank "was" on the carbureted models..... :cheers:

Jimmie

  • grayracer513

Posted March 29, 2011 - 11:18 AM

#15

The absolute optimum would be a T containing two reed or ball one-way check valves of an adequate capacity, one allowing air in, the other out of the T. The inlet side could then be connected to the CLEAN air side of the air box (between the filter and the engine), and the outlet to the current location. No oil in the intake, no outside air in the crankcase.

  • brentn

Posted March 29, 2011 - 04:10 PM

#16

Grey, how would I go about tapping into the air boot (between filter and engine) effectively? I was looking at grommets in which it might work with some RTV but maybe not. I would love to do it this way but I don't want there to be any chance of un-filtered air getting into the boot.

As for water getting into the filter where it is, yes, your right I didn't think of that.... For now I think I'm going to make a shield out of some PVC pipe to protect the filter from head on splashes/spraying etc. Should work fairly well.

  • grayracer513

Posted March 29, 2011 - 06:52 PM

#17

A standard pass through grommet (like a doughnut slotted around the circumference) used with a good sealer adhesive should work.

  • motojase316

Posted March 30, 2011 - 04:45 AM

#18

Sounds like I might re-work it then.
I just didn't want to have any possible chance of un-filtered air entering the system. This is why I plugged the end to make sure that air is drawn in and out through the filter and not an open line.


Without the plug you will be back to the original problem, through the filter will be a restriction so it will go for the easiest path, the unplugged line.

During normal operation crankcase pressure will be exiting the line and not drawing any contaminants in. During starting and stopping stalling etc a vacuum can occur pulling debris in the line back up the line.

  • motojase316

Posted March 30, 2011 - 04:51 AM

#19

The absolute optimum would be a T containing two reed or ball one-way check valves of an adequate capacity, one allowing air in, the other out of the T. The inlet side could then be connected to the CLEAN air side of the air box (between the filter and the engine), and the outlet to the current location. No oil in the intake, no outside air in the crankcase.


This system is a form of CLOSED CRANKCASE VENTILATION.

Edited by motojase316, April 02, 2011 - 10:23 PM.


  • grayracer513

Posted March 30, 2011 - 07:17 AM

#20

Without the plug you will be back to the original problem, through the filter will be a restriction so it will go for the easiest path, the unplugged line.

During normal operation crankcase pressure will be exiting the line and not drawing any contaminants in. During starting and stopping stalling etc a vacuum can occur pulling debris in the line back up the line.


This system is called CLOSED CRANKCASE VENTILATION.

Wrong on both counts.

On the first point, you would be correct only if the filter were allowed to become very dirty, and the debris being lifted were extremely light. If you let the filter become restricted, then there's no point in having it, or the second line that runs to it, and if you do that with a plugged hose on the down line, you may just as easily blow the cam cover half moons out from the built up crankcase pressure.

Closed crankcase ventilation requires the the only line OUT of the system is run to the intake manifold. Positive Crankcase Ventilation, as it is correctly called, consists of a metered passage from the crankcase to the manifold through a PCV valve, which draws air from a filtered hose usually located in the air filter, through the crankcase, and into the manifold. This is not at all the case in the plumbing suggestion I laid out.

The other thing to keep it mind in all of this is that the engine can only draw in more than the volume of air within the breather hose when it is operating or rotating at less than idle speeds, as when starting, or just as it comes to a stop. Any time that it is actually running, the vacuum caused by the piston upstroke is reversed to a positive pressure too quickly for the engine to ingest anything.





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