Proper cornering technique?


19 replies to this topic
  • bad mechanic

Posted February 22, 2011 - 11:16 AM

#1

My DRZ400SM is my first motard are riding street bikes for a long time, and I've been trying to figure out if the best method to corner on a motard is to hang off the inside of the bike like on a street bike, or to push the bike down into the turn under me, while keeping my body relatively upright. I've had people tell me both ways, and just riding the bike it feels like pushing it down into the turns feels better, but I'd really like to hear what people think.

  • npm

Posted February 22, 2011 - 11:27 AM

#2

I don't ride motard but the guys in the video linked in the first post in this thread are worth watching to get techique pointers.

http://www.thumperta...6458&highlight=

  • Jobistober

Posted February 22, 2011 - 11:50 AM

#3

Not claiming to be an expert or anything, but whenever I received pointers during my track days, guys would tell me to keep my body upright and let the bike move under me. I've tried both methods, and just letting the bike do its thing under me feels more comfortable.

I see more guys ride with motocross and flat track styles when riding motard than anything else.

  • smrookie

Posted February 22, 2011 - 12:06 PM

#4

Ride through the corners in what you feel most comfortable in. Some push the handlebar down with foot-out, & some drag their knees like sportbike guys.

Here's a kneedraggin' guy following me in this photo.
Posted Image

  • thatdrzguy

Posted February 22, 2011 - 12:30 PM

#5

Id like to hear some opinions on this as well.i can corner alright but I would like to improve

  • smrookie

Posted February 22, 2011 - 12:42 PM

#6

Let me ask you guys. Are you asking our opinions how to take corners on the "track" or on the "street?" I don't corner the same way when I'm on the street.
Posted Image

  • bad mechanic

Posted February 22, 2011 - 02:54 PM

#7

Sounds like I'm pretty good either way. The interesting thing is on street bikes it's much more natural for me to hang off, while on the DRZ it's not.

I like being able to keep my weight more forward not hanging off.

  • thatdrzguy

Posted February 22, 2011 - 03:10 PM

#8

I'm wondering about street.all the way up on the tank? Part way? Just little key tips

  • Jobistober

Posted February 22, 2011 - 03:19 PM

#9

When I ride my SM on the street (around town), I sit in the lowest point of the seat. There's no need to be up on the tank unless you're cornering aggressively, which you won't be doing unless you're in the twisties. In that case, I'm on the front edge of the seat.

Body is mostly upright through slower, shorter turns. Body leans in with the bike on longer, more sweeping turns. Riding street, feet rarely leave the pegs. Hanging off sprotbike style just doesn't feel right for me.

These, of course, are my riding habits. What may be right for me, may not be right for others. :smirk:

  • OnOneWheel

Posted February 22, 2011 - 03:47 PM

#10

High speed sweeper type corners - hang off.

Tight low speed corners - dirt bike it, foot out.

  • Mtsmith

Posted February 24, 2011 - 10:32 AM

#11

High speed sweeper type corners - hang off.

Tight low speed corners - dirt bike it, foot out.



Agreed.


Where are you in AL?

  • ZéPovinho

Posted February 24, 2011 - 01:36 PM

#12

Ride through the corners in what you feel most comfortable in. Some push the handlebar down with foot-out, & some drag their knees like sportbike guys.

Here's a kneedraggin' guy following me in this photo.
Posted Image


was that following you like this?



  • MindBlower

Posted February 25, 2011 - 02:45 PM

#13

WHile I "foot out" ed on dirt all the time, it really scares me on the street. Seems like just a pavement gap or break away from catching a toe or heel just a touch or a lot, but either way seems like it could destroy a knee in an instant.
Does that happen? (and I assume they have sliding pieces on their boots)

  • donny662

Posted February 25, 2011 - 08:58 PM

#14

You shouldn't need to put a foot out (or knee down) while on the street. While on the track, the pavement should be in good condition so that putting a foot on the ground, even with rubber soles, would be predictable. There are supermoto boots with replaceable plastic sliders.

  • mattlimo

Posted March 01, 2011 - 09:27 PM

#15

I do pretty much what everyone else said, but I pay attention to the corner signs. Usually 20mph, and below my foot is out. Above that my knee is out.

  • Rabbit636

Posted April 06, 2011 - 11:45 PM

#16

Im no pro, I cant even back it in, but I have been doing alot of reading on this subject and somewhere I found a statement that made sense. I read to put your body into the turn, have the inside butt cheek more towards the pavement. He explained it and it made sense (especially for the ones learning this technique), on pavement if your rear wheel hooks up and catches youre going to high side it and get thrown, especially if your on top of the bike pushing down. If youre leaning into the turn and your weight is on the inside of the bike and your rear tire catches youre more like to low side it. Ive high sided before on my sport bike and from experience, id definately rather low side it. Again, I havent done either yet, just what I read that made sense to me.

Now that I think about it... I dont even know if this thread is even about backing it in? lol

  • Debi

Posted April 07, 2011 - 02:50 PM

#17

Im no pro, I cant even back it in, but I have been doing alot of reading on this subject and somewhere I found a statement that made sense. I read to put your body into the turn, have the inside butt cheek more towards the pavement. He explained it and it made sense (especially for the ones learning this technique), on pavement if your rear wheel hooks up and catches youre going to high side it and get thrown, especially if your on top of the bike pushing down. If youre leaning into the turn and your weight is on the inside of the bike and your rear tire catches youre more like to low side it. Ive high sided before on my sport bike and from experience, id definately rather low side it. Again, I havent done either yet, just what I read that made sense to me.

Now that I think about it... I dont even know if this thread is even about backing it in? lol


I will say that riding dirt style foot out and crack of butt on outside edge of seat that you are more likely to save a highside than hanging off on the inside of the seat from my experience :cheers:

Here at the 2:30 mark you will see me save slp which could have been a highside... the KTM guy who rides knee out said if it was him he would have been tossed :p

I'm on the yellow bike with white helmet and black gear :ride:


  • Older and Slower

Posted April 08, 2011 - 03:11 AM

#18

My $ 0.02 .... coming from a sportbike background, i can't see why anyone would want to put a foot out while cornering at 50, 60, 70 MPH?? You sure as hell aren't going to 'save it' if something goes wrong ... as a previous poster stated, more likely to blow out a knee instead. Maybe it's so that your leg is out from under the bike when it low-sides? Maybe?

As for my bike and riding style, the only reason i slide a bit off of the seat on the inside is because the pegs drag in fast turns and with my weight to the inside i can keep the bike itself more upright and keep the pegs from getting ground short on the pavement. I do run rear-sets with alloy pegs though.

Again, just my $0.02.

Cheers

  • aussiedrzguy

Posted April 22, 2011 - 12:08 AM

#19

When you go really quick around corners motards can achieve really high lean angles and there is not enough room for your foot and leg. It can also help with front end loses on tight corners. If you search some photos out there you will see frames nearly dragging on the ground.

  • donny662

Posted April 22, 2011 - 09:10 AM

#20

Take a look at this link:

In all of the slow speed corners, everyone, including those on sportbikes, push the bike below there bodies. I think the "push the bike below you and maybe put a foot out" technique is best when you might need more control to make mid corner balance or direction changes. When going fast around the sweeping turns, you can't change the direction of the bike very well anyway so leaning into the curve will get the bike riding on a more stable area of the tire.




 
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