Begining Racer: How to hit big jumps


42 replies to this topic
  • 250stroker

Posted 28 January 2011 - 04:03 PM

#1

hi guys, i'm planning on begining my racing career this spring and i'd like a few pointers. i've been riding scince i was 6 (i'm now 17) and i ride a yz 250 2smoke. I'm fine on corners and whoops but i'd like some other tips on how to be comfortable in the air...any other advice??? Thanks!

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • d4yton

Posted 28 January 2011 - 04:12 PM

#2

start out small (duh..) because personally i think everyone has their own style of riding/jumping and there is no "right" way to do it. there are a few videos floating around youtube that can help you out, with the shape of the face of the jump, throttle control, etc.

  • 250stroker

Posted 28 January 2011 - 06:00 PM

#3

thanks, i've watched movies of myself jumping and i'm way too tense, i guess i just gotta loosen up a bit.

  • kx250fnick

Posted 28 January 2011 - 06:21 PM

#4

I've always been on the fence about jumping,because with me,its either get tons of air or no air at all.When I first started riding I had a big jump on my 110 that scared the crap out of me.I guess that is why im not too big into jumping anymore,have to start practicing again.

  • tye1138

Posted 29 January 2011 - 11:53 AM

#5

I'm not a good jumper, its one of the things that holds me back.

Because I'm not a good jumper, I have tried my hardest to learn everything I can about jumping and here are a few personal things I learned, besides the obvious; start small.

Preloading off the face of a jump is critical. A lot of beginner riders arn't consistent with jumping because they don't understand the preload aspect. Sometimes they hit it right on, other times they don't. When you approach a jump face, especially a jump which is long, you want to compress the whole bike off the face in order to get height. We're not talking about seat bouncing, its just a simple push by your body off the face of the jump. This will send you up in the air, which is the point of jumping.

Hit the jump with more speed then you think you'll need because, you'll need it. Most of people's issues with jumping is judging how much speed to approach a jump with. The answer is; everything you can muster! I'm not talking about blipping the throttle off the lip, I'm talking about raw miles per hour. Track builders design the tracks so it requires everything you got to clear most of the jumps, so getting that power down early out of the corner before the jump and ramping up to the jump is critical.

So why can't you jump? Is your brain freaking you out? Yea, that happens! Jumping is mental game because every time you jump, even if its the same jump, the outcome is different. Sometimes the nose will be high, other times the nose will be low. Practicing how to deal with those different situations will help generate confidence and seat time is truly the only way you'll figure any of this out. :thumbsup:

  • truep

Posted 29 January 2011 - 07:40 PM

#6

Hit the jump with more speed then you think you'll need because, you'll need it. Most of people's issues with jumping is judging how much speed to approach a jump with. The answer is; everything you can muster!


I'd hate to see anyone get hurt, so I just gotta say, be careful with this advice...while in many cases it's true, there are many jumps at the different tracks I ride, where you have to slow WAY down before the jump, or risk way overshooting it. I can name several at Milestone, and one at Cahuilla where you better slow down. At Pala, there are a couple jumps where you'd get really hurt if you threw everything you had at it. I hate slowing down, but if you don't, you'll have a painful landing, or even land too far into the corner. For the most part (unless the jump is pretty small), I try to judge my speed to land on the downslope.

  • Sharp Shooter

Posted 29 January 2011 - 07:56 PM

#7

I believe repetition is your best friend.

I give 4 tips when I get a first timer on a track.

1. Jump standing up and try and get your head forward enough to be over your bars to center your weight.

2. Generally speaking the steeper the face the more gas you'll want to apply off the ramp.

3. Allways have some gas on going off a jump...

4. Squeeze the bike with your legs.

I'm no pro but thats my 02.

  • tye1138

Posted 29 January 2011 - 11:38 PM

#8

I'd hate to see anyone get hurt, so I just gotta say, be careful with this advice...while in many cases it's true, there are many jumps at the different tracks I ride, where you have to slow WAY down before the jump, or risk way overshooting it. I can name several at Milestone, and one at Cahuilla where you better slow down. At Pala, there are a couple jumps where you'd get really hurt if you threw everything you had at it. I hate slowing down, but if you don't, you'll have a painful landing, or even land too far into the corner. For the most part (unless the jump is pretty small), I try to judge my speed to land on the downslope.


Ohh your right, small to medium jumps my advice is 100% incorrect.

BUT

The OP was talking about BIG jumps, of which the advice is pretty sane. :thumbsup:

  • 250stroker

Posted 30 January 2011 - 05:44 AM

#9

thanks guys, i;m very comfortable going fast until i'm coming up on a huge ramp pointing at the sky. i'll do alot of practicing and get comforable doing it...thanks again!!!

  • dennis391

Posted 30 January 2011 - 02:52 PM

#10

What seems to help me is to watch other riders hit the jump your wanting to clear. Then follow some guys matching thier speed off the jump the first time. Then practice it over and over again!
Be carefull and have fun!

  • truep

Posted 30 January 2011 - 07:37 PM

#11

Ahh...you're right, Tye...my bad. Yeah, big jumps- hit them with all the speed you can. You're advice was right...sorry...I forgot the post title while I was reading...short term memory, lol!

  • 665

Posted 30 January 2011 - 07:43 PM

#12

Get the right gear.
Make sure your bike is 100% safe and sound.
Relax. You're riding for fun. Not to impress people. (Everyone was a teen at once)
Start with small doubles or table tops.
Then (and I will probably get flamed for this) go to a local Faircross race or a relatively small race track and race B class. Find the "big jump" at the track which is usually a triple. Some guys in B class will triple it and some will double. Just go hit it. Watch how the other guys hit the double and then just go hit it. Your adrenaline will help you. Once you clear your first double, from there on out you'll feel very comfy with hitting it. I'm working on hitting my first big triple, and the way I am getting comfy with the speed and air is hitting a tabletop of equal side and pretending the flat landing jump isnt below me...or just purposely overshooting the double a tad until I get the confidence to gun it to hit the triple. When it comes to big jumps...you'd probably always rather OVERshoot a triple than undershoot it.

Good luck..and have fun. Remember, when racing or riding becomes so serious that you are only there to show off or win, then it isn't motocross anymore. You will get hurt if you don't relax and have fun!

  • 665

Posted 30 January 2011 - 07:45 PM

#13

And just so everyone knows...theres a lot of kids out there about 15-19 years old who go to a mx race and think it is so easy and that they wanna take their 97kx125 or their dads 02CRF450 out there and race everybody and beat them. When you are the one out there in the gear at the face of the jump it changes everything. It looks easier than it is. I remember a few years back when my sisters boyfriend raced and I thought it looked so easy. I quickly came to realize that once you're out there on the track it gets scary. Just have fun and don't worry what anyone says. Everyone starts somewhere!

  • Die_trying

Posted 30 January 2011 - 08:04 PM

#14

the only way to get comfortable in the air is to spend time in the air. If you really want to be comfortable jumping, go to a local riding area if it has jumps or track and practice. I like to warm up on smaller jumps then move on to the bigger scarier jumps (and depending on your skill level, generally large jumps aren't any more difficult then small jumps). If you can go ride track mid week or sometime when its not busy and can cut the track and practice jumps your not 100% comfortable on over and over. If your out riding laps your only going to hit a jump once every lap. You can get a lot more jump practice by focusing on specific jumps. That being said, jumps are the easiest obstacle on a mx track, and being able to corner well makes jumping much easier.

  • tye1138

Posted 31 January 2011 - 12:08 AM

#15

the only way to get comfortable in the air is to spend time in the air. If you really want to be comfortable jumping, go to a local riding area if it has jumps or track and practice. I like to warm up on smaller jumps then move on to the bigger scarier jumps (and depending on your skill level, generally large jumps aren't any more difficult then small jumps). If you can go ride track mid week or sometime when its not busy and can cut the track and practice jumps your not 100% comfortable on over and over. If your out riding laps your only going to hit a jump once every lap. You can get a lot more jump practice by focusing on specific jumps. That being said, jumps are the easiest obstacle on a mx track, and being able to corner well makes jumping much easier.


+1

I have to agree cuz its the advice you gave me and it works! LOL :thumbsup:

Though I wouldn't call jumps the "easiest" obstacle because they have the greatest consequences if you mess up. You probably won't break your legs in the corners or whoop sections... But then again, my friend broke his toes from running them over with his rear tire in a corner and he didn't even flinch! LOL :lol:

Talk about bad body position!!!

  • yamahammer426

Posted 31 January 2011 - 09:30 AM

#16

And just so everyone knows...theres a lot of kids out there about 15-19 years old who go to a mx race and think it is so easy and that they wanna take their 97kx125 or their dads 02CRF450 out there and race everybody and beat them. When you are the one out there in the gear at the face of the jump it changes everything. It looks easier than it is. I remember a few years back when my sisters boyfriend raced and I thought it looked so easy. I quickly came to realize that once you're out there on the track it gets scary. Just have fun and don't worry what anyone says. Everyone starts somewhere!


I know the feeling. Good riders really do make it look easy. You look at the jump when you're not on the bike and you say to yourself, "It's not that big, I can hit that" then you come up to the face of it on the bike and your mind says, "That's way bigger than I thought it was!"

Usually, once you start clearing it, it starts to look more and more like the jump you were seeing when you were off the bike, though.

  • 665

Posted 31 January 2011 - 10:27 AM

#17

I know the feeling. Good riders really do make it look easy. You look at the jump when you're not on the bike and you say to yourself, "It's not that big, I can hit that" then you come up to the face of it on the bike and your mind says, "That's way bigger than I thought it was!"

Usually, once you start clearing it, it starts to look more and more like the jump you were seeing when you were off the bike, though.


I agree 100% and this is actually what drives a lot of the newer kids out of the sport. They are intimidated by the kids their age on 250's and 450's hitting triples like they've been doing it forever....because most of them have.

  • 250stroker

Posted 31 January 2011 - 03:11 PM

#18

thanks guys, i'll do a lot of jumping at silver lake sand dunes this spring to get comfortable. dune jumps freak me out cuz you're flying up a steep hill and all you can see is the sky...but i'll get used to it. i'll probably start off in "Open D" class. you're not allowed to double the big jumps, then i'll probably go for 250 C where i can jump everything accept for the stadium tripple. like i said, i'm a very fast rider otherwise, just gotta work on the air!!! THANKS!!

  • 665

Posted 31 January 2011 - 06:22 PM

#19

I was on the same boat. Except around here we have no Open D beginners class. And to be honest C class competition is really tough, not because there are a lot of good riders, but because usually theres always two heats for 250C both with full or close to full gates.. I'm looking into 250B and 250C class just to get away from all the bikes!

  • pittss1c

Posted 31 January 2011 - 06:36 PM

#20

I spent the entire year learning jumps one at a time by following people advice on which to hit first, and following them over.
Then it is awesome to be at a track where you can safely shortcut the track and do some good repetition to lock it down.





Related Content

Forums
Photo

Supercross Monster Energy Cup by Gary_Semics


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Technical Forums   MX Riding Technique
  • 0 replies
Forums
Photo

Motocross Cornering Skills by Gary_Semics


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Technical Forums   MX Riding Technique
  • 0 replies
Forums
Photo

Become a Gary Semics MX Certified Instructor by Gary_Semics


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Technical Forums   MX Riding Technique
  • 0 replies
Wiki
Staying in the ZONE - last post by Gary_Semics

Staying in the ZONE


Wiki Articles
  • 0 replies
Forums
Photo

Motocross Rutted Corners by Gary_Semics


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Technical Forums   MX Riding Technique
  • 0 replies
 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

Register Close
If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.