110/100x18 work instead of 100x100x18?


16 replies to this topic
  • wanawakeboard

Posted January 25, 2011 - 06:28 PM

#1

I accidentally ordered a 110/100x18 tire for my 05crf230, but the tire on it is a 100x100x18 tire will this work or should I change my order? need help right away because Id like to catch it before it ships , thanks :thumbsup:

  • luckystar64

Posted January 25, 2011 - 06:47 PM

#2

I think it'd be really hard to get mounted. I'd go with what belongs on there. --L*64

  • Towlieee

Posted January 25, 2011 - 07:13 PM

#3

Shouldn't really be a problem, you likely wont notice any difference. Really shouldn't be any harder to mount, thats a very small difference, less then half a inch wider.

The street tires I run on my 150f are 130mm wide! They are way over sized, but give me a nice big platform for wheelies lol :thumbsup:


'technically' speaking, it could give you more traction, but could also make the bike turn in a little slower.. But it wont be much of a difference, and you probably wont notice it.

  • 1moreaccord

Posted January 26, 2011 - 09:11 AM

#4

^^ This. It's fine, and on the 230 you likely won't notice any difference!

And if this is your first time changing from the stock tires, it can only get better! :thumbsup:

  • 4strokeridertt

Posted January 26, 2011 - 09:59 AM

#5

A 110 is only 10mm wider. In the code 100/100x18 it means its 100mm wide and it is 100% as tall as wide and fits an 18" rim. Your 110/100 will be 10mm wider and 10mm taller which moves the back of the bike up 5mm or half the height.

  • wanawakeboard

Posted January 26, 2011 - 10:29 AM

#6

thanks much guys, I emailed them and they corrected the problem before shipping the tire, maybe Ill go wider next time intentionally..thanks for the input...

  • coeshow

Posted January 26, 2011 - 06:26 PM

#7

To answer your question, I have always run the 110/100-18 on my bike. Fits no problem. You might try the larger size next time. This will give you some comparative data riding with the larger tire. You can then decide from experience which one you prefer.

  • Dwight_Rudder

Posted January 26, 2011 - 06:33 PM

#8

The bike really likes the smaller 100/100X18 better and it is not as hard on the clutch. I had to go down as my modified bike could easily pull a 110/100 but the clutch was seriously overloaded and the bike felt like it ran better with the smaller tire.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Towlieee

Posted January 26, 2011 - 07:22 PM

#9

The bike really likes the smaller 100/100X18 better and it is not as hard on the clutch. I had to go down as my modified bike could easily pull a 110/100 but the clutch was seriously overloaded and the bike felt like it ran better with the smaller tire.


no offense, but I think it's all in your head.. Maybe you just killed your clutch due to your technique, and/or rode different after you replaced it and your tire?

Would riding street, or say a trials tire and grabbing more grip also be harder on your clutch? What about a 110 in sand vs a 100 on terrain where you grip better?

  • ramz

Posted January 26, 2011 - 10:36 PM

#10

You don't tug on Superman's cape
You don't spit into the wind
You don't pull the mask off the old Lone Ranger
And you don't mess around with Jim, da do da do...


:thumbsup: :lol: :ride:


Dwight Rudder, 7 time ISDT/E medalist, 6 time class champion in the AMA Nat'l Enduro Series. ... and the 1998 and 99 Nat'l Enduro Sr. A champion.

I think Dwight has his clutch technique down pat, and I mean down.

























:(

  • Towlieee

Posted January 27, 2011 - 10:21 AM

#11

Doesn't mean he knows everything about a specific motorcycle inside and out..

I really doubt a 110mm tire vs 100 is the difference between a clutch killer.. If that was the case, riding on pavement with his built motor would kill clutches even faster. :thumbsup:

edit: Not doubting his riding skill, not doubting he is very knowledgeable on the subject, but come on.. If you mount a 110 tire and kill a clutch shortly after, something else had to be wrong IMO

  • VortecCPI

Posted January 27, 2011 - 11:42 AM

#12

My buddy uses a 110/100-18 on his 230 with no problems whatsoever.

As mentioned earlier, it is only 10mm wider (0.394") but it is 20mm (0.787") bigger in diameter and 2.472" bigger in circumference. To get back to the stock overall ratio you may want to increase your rear sprocket accordingly. So...

Stock tire circumference = Pi x 25.874"
New tire circumference = Pi x 26.661"

New sprocket = 50 x (26.661 / 25.874) = 51.5 teeth.

Good luck with that 1/2 tooth. Seriously though, my buddy went to a 52 tooth rear sprocket to make up for the taller overall drive ratio.

  • n2omike

Posted January 27, 2011 - 12:24 PM

#13

The tire size ratings aren't exact, and vary a LOT between tires... even between different tires of the same brand. Some 100/100/18's are tiny, while some are huge.

I have a 100/100/18 Maxxis IT and a 110/100/18 Desert IT in the garage, and the 110 looks way more than 10mm bigger.

The tire sizing numbers, in reality, are a pretty loose guideline.

We all know that a lighter tire handles better. We also know that you sometimes want to be able to clutch it for some wheelspin. If you think you know more about clutching and riding than Dwight Rudder... someone who has obviously 'been there and done that' a WHOLE lot more than anybody here on a CRF230 forum... then you obviously high opinion of yourself. :thumbsup:

Good Luck!

  • VortecCPI

Posted January 27, 2011 - 02:21 PM

#14

The tire size ratings aren't exact, and vary a LOT between tires... even between different tires of the same brand. Some 100/100/18's are tiny, while some are huge.


Agreed - I should mention the tire he uses is an IRC Volcanduro VE-33 - Just like what used to come on the old XRs and as recommended by Al Baker Sr. himself.

Although we haven't actually measured the two tires, I can say, with the exception of the huge knobbies, the tire itself isn't too much bigger. What I can say for sure is that for this particular tire there are no interference issues.


We also know that you sometimes want to be able to clutch it for some wheelspin.


Agreed - You may think the 230 has tons of torque (and it does) but once you mount an aggressive tire like the VE-33 you can just forget about the power-sliding you were easily doing with that POS stock Pirelli. It does, however, stick like eggs on a cheap frying pan now!

  • Towlieee

Posted January 27, 2011 - 04:31 PM

#15

If you think you know more about clutching and riding than Dwight Rudder... someone who has obviously 'been there and done that' a WHOLE lot more than anybody here on a CRF230 forum... then you obviously high opinion of yourself. :ride:

Good Luck!


I don't know if you were directing that at me, or just making a general statement.. But I definitely was not saying I know more then him, not even close, by any means.

All I was saying is, I bet it's all in his head.. Sure it probably is a little harder on the clutch, but if a 10mm wider tire makes that much different, then riding on a surface that gives you more traction, would also do the same thing..

I do know the clutches on all my bikes last a very long time, and I abuse the hell out of them. Of course my 150/230 experience is extremely limited, as I have a pretty much bone stock 150f, which will practically never kill a clutch. So I don't think I'm doing anything wrong, clutch wise. :thumbsup:

On a side note, if it's so much harder on clutches running a 10mm wider tire, like noticeably wears them out faster, wouldn't that mean you are getting a lot more traction on a 10mm wider tire? Of course, your cornering might get a little worse, and the turn in would be a little slower. Of course depending on the type of riding you do, it could be possible that a 110mm is better anyways. But just all depends on personal preference, and what kind of riding you do imo. After all, don't 450's run a 120mm tire or so stock? Of course though, they run a bigger tire for more traction since they lay down a lot more power. If they could get plenty of traction with a 100mm tire I'm sure that would be a better choice as it would turn in better. But of course I'm just guesstimating here.

I wasn't questioning his knowledge at all, just making a general statement. I mean, does anyone here think I'm way off base by disagreeing with the statement that a 110mm tire is harder on the clutch vs a 100mm tire?

Again not trying to 'diss' him, or down his knowledge, or anyones knowledge. I don't look at someone like James Stewart and assume he knows it all about how his bike works, just because he can ride it like an animal. :lol:

  • Towlieee

Posted January 27, 2011 - 04:37 PM

#16

Also I will say this, the fastest guys are generally going to abuse clutches a lot more. Especially when it comes to stuff like taking off the line, or drag racing, and well riding a low powered bike like a 150/230f and slipping the clutch a lot around corners. I know when I climb hills on my 150f, if it's a short hill I can shoot right up in 2nd with no clutch work. But longer hills, I'll find myself holding it WOT and using the clutch to keep the bike up in power band, sometimes right on the edge of rev limiter (and well sometimes I mess up and I'm at rev limiter going up a hill). Of course that abuses the hell out of my clutch, but screw it, clutches are cheap enough, and I've already got 4 years out of mine so far. :thumbsup:

I know when I do a 1/4 mile run on my sport bike, I leave the line over 9k rpm, slipping the clutch like hell tell I'm going fast enough to stay in the power band with the clutch fully engaged. That tears the hell out of my clutch, and after 3-6 launches like that back to back my clutch starts to slip tell I drive it normal and burn some of the glaze off.
But that also makes me a lot fastest then leaving the line and not slipping the clutch. Just all the name of the game. :lol:

Hell people have told me for years automotive oil "destroys clutches" and such.. Or I love the line "wheelies tear clutches up"... Funny as I've only had automotive oil in my honda f4i from 12k miles tell its current 46k miles, stock clutch, and I ride wheelies on it regularly. Yet I know countless people who run honda oil, or a high dollar 'motorcycle oil', and can sometimes burn clutches out on bikes with less then 10k miles.. From racers, to new riders.

Sorry to whore the thread out, but at least the OP already got his answer and got everything solved. :ride::thumbsup:
It's easy to write a novel online when I can type a little over 100wmp with minimal errors lol :(


  • Towlieee

Posted January 27, 2011 - 04:43 PM

#17

The tire size ratings aren't exact, and vary a LOT between tires... even between different tires of the same brand. Some 100/100/18's are tiny, while some are huge.


That is definitely true, I know for my crf50, I had a 70mm tire, and a 80mm tire, and the 70mm was wider.. I mounted them up (80 in the rear) got done and noticed the front was wider! had to swap them lol





Related Content

Forums
Photo

Stickey: Jetting the 230F (Power-up Kit) by 230F


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Honda   CRF 150/230 F/L
  • Hot  509 replies
Forums
Photo

DOT Street Tires for a 2005 Honda CRF230F by daateamhonda


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Honda   CRF 150/230 F/L
  • 3 replies
Forums
Photo

What bike to get... by Tandog99


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Honda   CRF150 R/Expert
  • Hot  27 replies
Forums
Photo

85 2 stroke or 150R by Bill_B


Dirt Bike   General Dirt Bike Forums   What bike should I buy?
  • Hot  58 replies
Reviews

Honda CRF230F 2015 by Bryan Bosch


Honda CRF230F 2015
  • 0 reviews
 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.