YamaLink for 2010 YZF


35 replies to this topic
  • foxracr767

Posted January 14, 2011 - 03:14 PM

#21

And from what Luckyguy19 said he is a desert guy so making the bike more stable would benefit him but it sounds like others did this to help overall handling. confused.

  • grayracer513

Posted January 14, 2011 - 03:53 PM

#22

Since the "problem" with the '10-'11 hasn't really been identified, it's a little hard to speak to, but a few generalities do apply:

Raising the back of the bike or lowering the front makes the head angle "steeper" (smaller numbers), and makes the bike less prone to push, turn in more readily, but increases the tendency to "knife in" (where the front wheel grabs at ruts and lumps and tries to turn itself inward) and decreases high speed stability and the ability to absorb big impacts at high speed.

Lowering the back or raising the front does just the opposite: It makes the bike track straighter in the rough and at speed, even in corners, but makes the steering feel slower, and increases the tendency to push and climb out of ruts to the outside.

The rear linkage consist of two parts: the connecting link and the relay arm. The purpose of the complete linkage is to cause there to be a greater amount of shock travel per inch of wheel travel as the rear suspension compresses. This increase is called the rising rate.

Lengthening the link will lower the bike, shortening it will raise the bike. Apart from the change in height, the main effect of this is that it changes the angle of the steering head. There are other effects, but they are relatively minor, and either change has little if any effect on the linkage rate itself.

Altering the center-to-center dimensions or angles of the relay arm can raise or lower the bike, or leave the height unchanged, as well as altering the rising rate (or not). Just depends on how it's done.

Dave Johnson at SMART Performance, among some others, is of the opinion that all recently mad Yamaha models have no problem related to linkage rates that can't be controlled or corrected with a proper shock setup, anyway, so there's that bit of it to think about.

Lastly, of course, is the placebo effect. There are a lot of people who will feel an immediate improvement in handling when a new top triple clamp is installed, when, of course, nothing at all is really changed except possibly the handlebar position. A shiny new $150 part can do a lot for one's perception.

  • foxracr767

Posted January 14, 2011 - 04:28 PM

#23

Very true Gray. and for most of us its more mental than anything. suspension tuning is looking like more like the correct direction to go on the new bikes. Thanks for the input.

  • HRC

Posted January 15, 2011 - 01:32 AM

#24

Is this really such a bad handling bike really ?

I have ridden mine now a couple of times and don´t feel any strange handling problems at all. Sure you need to adapt your riding style slightly coming from a CRF450 but no big deal.

But, and I said but because I have only ridden mine on a hardpack snow/ice track with no braking bumps and such, so I guess I should not really say to much before I have ridden it on a normal summer track.
But usually if something is way off, you feel it pretty much right away when you ride the bike on a track though.

  • MXR176

Posted January 15, 2011 - 10:58 AM

#25

I have the Ride Engineering Linkage on mine. It lowers the ass end 10mm. I think it helped the bike out tremendously, it helped out with the bike wanting to over steer coming in the corner. It also helped the thing coming out of the corners in Chop and stutter bumps tract and not hop. I set the sag at 104mm and the only thing I had to do was stiifen up the HS Comp a little bit. I personally think it made the bike better then it already is.

http://www.ride-engi...&pn=YZ-LKA44-BA

  • grayracer513

Posted January 15, 2011 - 11:49 AM

#26

It also helped the thing coming out of the corners in Chop and stutter bumps tract and not hop.

This is a shock valving issue with pretty much all KYB's, and is usually related to the base of the rebound stack. Has an effect on trailing throttle oversteer as well.

  • MXR176

Posted January 15, 2011 - 12:20 PM

#27

This is a shock valving issue with pretty much all KYB's, and is usually related to the base of the rebound stack. Has an effect on trailing throttle oversteer as well.


I noticed the Oversteer really bad entering the corner when you would go from throttle to breaking. It was turn before I was expecting it to.

  • HRC

Posted January 15, 2011 - 02:22 PM

#28

I noticed the Oversteer really bad entering the corner when you would go from throttle to breaking. It was turn before I was expecting it to.


Yes....this is something I can relate to. Felt it a couple of times when I rode it today. But I used the clutch to compensate it. It is like the engine braking comes into play sometimes.:smirk:

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • HRC

Posted January 15, 2011 - 02:21 PM

#29

I noticed the Oversteer really bad entering the corner when you would go from throttle to breaking. It was turn before I was expecting it to.


Yes....this is something I can relate to. Felt it a couple of times when I rode it today. But I used the clutch to compensate it. It is like the engine braking comes into play sometimes.:smirk:

  • grayracer513

Posted January 15, 2011 - 04:01 PM

#30

I noticed the Oversteer really bad entering the corner when you would go from throttle to breaking. It was turn before I was expecting it to.

Define over steer as you are using the term. I think we're talking about two separate things.

Over steer is the tail end sliding out before the front. It does not describe any sort of behavior of the steering itself. Under steer is the front end sliding before the back breaks loose; "pushing", as it is often referred to.

It sounds like what you are describing is "knifing", or "cutting in", possibly even "tucking". Lowering the rear would actually reduce that.

  • MXR176

Posted January 15, 2011 - 04:24 PM

#31

Define over steer as you are using the term. I think we're talking about two separate things.

Over steer is the tail end sliding out before the front. It does not describe any sort of behavior of the steering itself. Under steer is the front end sliding before the back breaks loose; "pushing", as it is often referred to.

It sounds like what you are describing is "knifing", or "cutting in", possibly even "tucking". Lowering the rear would actually reduce that.


Sorry my bad! I was mixed up on my termanology Grayracer. Yes it was knifing and cutting in before I put the lowering link on it. I wasn't ready or prepared for it at all. I was used to the older 450 push and this one was wanting to turn before I was ready for it.

  • grayracer513

Posted January 15, 2011 - 05:19 PM

#32

You would probably have found the same "fault" with an RMZ, then. If you had had the suspension done and taken some time with it, you most likely would have been happily adjusted to it by now, but the importanat thing is that you like it.

  • MXR176

Posted January 15, 2011 - 05:24 PM

#33

I have a Two year ol and started a new job this year and had to watch what I did being on probation for six months. I have been with ENZO the last 5 years and have established a good relationship with both Will and Craig Decker. I did what I had to do to get by this year. Its all going to ENZO here in a couple weeks to get the work over.

  • almostinvincible119

Posted January 19, 2011 - 02:07 PM

#34

So MXR, I'm having the same issues with my bike wanting to knife at turn in, and the Ride Eng Link cleared it up?

So the Ride Eng link lowers the bike 10mm, and the 07 wr450 link brings it down 11, wouldn't the affects be nearly the same at a fraction of the cost? (Note: I KNOW that 1mm can make a huge difference, but how much is the question)

  • MXR176

Posted January 20, 2011 - 04:19 AM

#35

Ya it made the thing handle way better and it quit with the knifing. I would go with the Ride Engineering one, The WR one might take a good bike back to a pushing hog like the older 450s

  • grayracer513

Posted January 20, 2011 - 07:31 AM

#36

So the Ride Eng link lowers the bike 10mm, and the 07 wr450 link brings it down 11, wouldn't the affects be nearly the same at a fraction of the cost? (Note: I KNOW that 1mm can make a huge difference, but how much is the question)

In the extremely unlikely event that the millimeter made any difference, you could compensate simply enough by dropping the front end (raise the fork) 1mm.





Related Content

Forums
Photo

Chubby dad, looking at bikes , First trip to the orange/black forum ! by Slow_ride


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   KTM   250-530 EXC/MXC/SXC/XC-W/XCR-W (4-Strokes)
  • Hot  28 replies
Forums
Photo

YZ450F 03 Sparks driving me crazy by SirAttard


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Yamaha   YZ 400/426/450
  • 5 replies
Forums
Photo

Megabomb Fitment by 288yz450


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Yamaha   YZ 400/426/450
  • 1 reply
Forums
Photo

Snake pit oct 30th by The Anvil


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Regional Discussion   California
  • Hot  293 replies
Forums
Photo

yz250x vs 450 4t comparisons (preferably desert riding) needed by JakeNorthrupYZ450F


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Yamaha   Yamaha 2-Stroke
  • 9 replies
 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.