426,250f.or250?



8 replies to this topic
  • jimyz

Posted March 17, 2001 - 07:08 AM

#1

I recently changed from a 00yz250 to the 426 and have about 14 hours on the 426. I did not consider the 250f in the beginning. My concerns with the 426 are the wieght, Im 5'10 155lbs and not used to the extra feel, I also have a time with "rolling the throttle on" although it is getting better, the 426 also is monstrously torquey at unpredictable moments. I could go on, I mostly ride mx and am thinking of the 250f or going back to the two stroke. The question is- Should I continue learning the 426? Does the bike as a package become easier to ride? Is the 250f a wrong choice for mx tracks with larger doubles and triples? Thankx for any imput.

  • Scott_F

Posted March 17, 2001 - 07:41 AM

#2

If you like the feel of the four stroke, but are having trouble adjusting to the 426F beast, you should definitely consider the 250F. You are the perfect size for the 250F, and it will haul around a MX track. Keep in mind that is meant to compete with the 125 2S, and it has to be ridden aggressively, since it doesn't have the raw power of the 426F. It is slower than a 250 2S, but faster than a 125 2S.

Just yesterday I was riding mine at the redesigned Perris Raceway. They basically routed it backwards and added/changed some obstacles. There is a 90-100' triple out of a 180 right that goes up a gradual incline, followed by another one about the same size. I had to rail the turn in third, slipping the clutch a bit to keep it meaty, then hit fourth before the launch in order to clear it. It was tricky and technical, but I got it dialed. The 250F is way more fun to ride everywhere on the track, but, like a 125, it can be more difficult to get over the largest jumps.
Although with a long enough approach, it will easily clear the largest gaps.

You should try to get a ride on one before deciding.

  • forloop

Posted March 18, 2001 - 09:57 AM

#3

I know a lot of people, me included, need more than 14 hours to get use to the bike. I would give it some more time.

I know I have working hard on trying to ride it smoothly. But, I found it helpful to just cut loose on it a little too.

What I did was ride mine like a two-stoke for a few laps. It then started registering in my head what was different.

Don't need all the clutch coming out of corners.

Don't need as much rear brake. I would brake like a two-stoke at first, then let off the rear brake while still straight and let the compression braking do some work.

Can get on the gas early.

Can fly out of corners. Just keep twisting until your nerves can't take it.

Good Luck.

------------------
Rick
01 YZ426F #85 Vet C

  • ICEMAN

Posted March 20, 2001 - 05:36 AM

#4

one advantage i have found is that racing a 4 stroke made me a much smoother rider, which shaves much off lap times. just don't stall in mid-air

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • AngryCandy

Posted March 20, 2001 - 07:59 AM

#5

Jim,

I am the same height & weight as you and made the switch from the yz400 to a yz250f this year. The 400 was geared down for woods, and to be perfectly honest, it scared the crap out of me more than once. That bike was so tall and so heavy and had so much power that I could not handle it comfortably unless it was WIDE open terrain. Big, steep, open hill climbs were phenomenal, but when the going got tight and technical, the beast was a handful for someone of our stature. I understand you position exactly.

That said, the 250f is the most amazingly fun thing that I have ever ridden (chicks included.) I don't mx, but would have a hard time believing that the bike would not be powerful enough for you at 155. I feel that I am in total control of the bike rather than being at the mercy of it with one little mistake. The ergos are just about perfect for our size (still a little tall, but the weight reduction makes all the difference in the world.) Many guys have a difficult time starting, but mine fires first or second kick every time, hot or cold, from the day I picked it up.

It would be a shame to lose a good bit of money on the sale of your slightly used 426, so I would try really hard to find someone who will let you ride their 250f before taking the leap.

  • jimyz

Posted March 24, 2001 - 07:29 AM

#6

Angry Candy, what you replied is so true, the hieght, wieght, and monstrous power is overwhelming in tight and tricky situations. A few friends of mine have said " give it time, you will get used to the power and wieght difference", the bike is a little bit taller than the 00250 I was used too, but I do wonder if I should just continue riding the 426 or move on? I do like the power on demand but the 426 doesn't seem to have much room for error when on the gas intensely and you better have the bike pointed in the right direction or a soil sample is in order. I find that the bike jumps well, just don't get the rear end out of shape because I don't seem to be able to straighten the bike up in mid flight, an mx track I like has several doubles, a triple, and one quad which I double double. As far as $, I bought the 426 used so if I were to sell, my test ride wouldn't be to expensive, a few hundred bucks. Thanx for the insight-later

  • DaveJ

Posted March 24, 2001 - 07:37 PM

#7

I agree, the bike is a bit of a monster and I wish Yamaha would begin to focus on taming the beast a bit.

It needs to be lighter, it needs a lower center of gravity, and it needs to be more nimble. However, it's a great bike.

You can make some changes to help, but the bottom line is riding style.

I personally think that these bikes, and others in the class, are the future of the sport. It's just going to take a while for the technology to get defined as well as the riding styles.

Keep a close eye on what's happening in the AMA scene and you'll see what I mean.

So stick with it - and you'll stay in front of the curve.

DaveJ

  • KD

Posted March 25, 2001 - 06:25 AM

#8

I bought a YZ426 in 2000, having never ridden one, because my brother said it was awesome. I kept my 98 YZ250 though. To be honest when I first rode the bike I was dissappointed it did not make as much power as I thought it would and I really noticed the weight. So I kept riding my 250 shortly there after the 2 stroke started acting up like they always do,and the shock blew. This forced me to ride the thumper. I crashed hard a couple of times from the comp braking(stalled in the air on a triple,it was ugly)but eventually got more comfortable on the bike. To cut this story short I would take the time to get used to the bike,you will grow to love it. 1998 YZ250 FOR SALE.

  • jimyz

Posted March 26, 2001 - 05:16 AM

#9

Thanx for the imput, for now I am scratching my head and will continue learning the bike. I do see the future of this sport being a 4 stroke arena. I have ridden the new 250f and liked it(maybe 2002). I think it is possible to have to much power but I guess it's in how you use it.





Related Content

Reviews

Yamaha YZ450F 2017 by Chris.GVS


Yamaha YZ450F 2017
  • - - - - -
  • 0 reviews
Forums
Photo
Motocross

Thinking about Yamaha 250... by Arctic Pride


Dirt Bike   Special Interest Forums   Pro Racing
  • Hot  491 replies
Forums
Photo

Is it worth it? (Cam and High compression piston) by macgi77


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Honda   CRF 150/230 F/L
  • Hot  36 replies
Forums
Photo

2016 YZ450 by CaptainKnobby


Dirt Bike   Dirt Bike Technical Forums   Suspension
  • Hot  59 replies
Forums
Photo

Megabomb Fitment by 288yz450


Dirt Bike   Make / Model Specific   Yamaha   YZ 400/426/450
  • 1 reply
 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.