How to change oil and oil filter on '07+ Yamaha WR450F


11 replies to this topic
  • pickawinner

Posted December 11, 2010 - 08:31 PM

#1

Doing your own oil changes is pretty easy and is the best way to extend the life of your bike. In this “how to” I’ll be changing oil and oil filter on a 2008 Yamaha WR450F. I’ll be following the instructions in the manual, which you can download here. I used a K&N oil filter (KN-141) $9 from Cyclegear. You will also need a couple of crush washers, I used M10 (10mm inner dia).


Start with a clean bike and a clean workspace. Warm up the oil by doing a couple of laps around the neighborhood. I prefer to ride the bike a little rather than just let it idle to get all the oil up to temperature. This makes sure that even the oil that’s in the transmission warms up and the air flow keeps the rest of the bike from overheating.
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With the bike all warmed up, remove the skid plate (3 bolts). The manual recommends removing the oil fill cap and the dipstick at this point, I did, but don’t think it was really necessary at this point.
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Place an oil pan under the bike (accounting the trajectory of a shooting stream of oil). Unscrew the drain bolt and be ready for the hot oil stream that will shoot out. Tip: I suggest wrapping a small section of the bike frame in aluminum foil to keep the oil from getting into the tiny crack where a cross brace is welded to the frame (see where I have oil drip on the frame), I didn’t do this, but wish I had. Wait for all the oil to drain and then tip the bike even more to the left to get more oil out.
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Unscrew 3 bolts of the oil filter cover and remove. All 3 bolts are different, so just remember where each goes. Here I wrapped the hose with a piece of plastic to keep it clean.
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Remove the old oil filter. A tiny bit of oil will drip out.
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Remove the crankcase drain bolt.
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Expect more oil to stream out, so get the pan ready. If your pan isn’t large enough to be under all the holes you opened up, screw in the first drain bolt you removed (use a new crush washer) and replace the oil filter with the cover. After most of the oil came out of the crankcase, tip the bike to the right to get the last bit of it.
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Put in the new filter and reinstall the cover. Tighten the cover bolts evenly, a little at a time each.
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Reinstall both drain bolts with new crush washers. Put in fresh oil. I used about 1.1qt of Motul 3000 10w40. Close the oil fill cap and screw in the dipstick. At this point you could consider the job finished if you wanted, but this was my first oil change on this bike and I wanted to finish it according to the manual, which called for checking the oil level and pressure.

Now let’s check the oil pressure. With all the drain bolts closed and fresh oil in the bike, crack open the oil galley bolt (8mm, see the wrench in the pic below). Don’t open it, just crack it. Start the engine and watch for oil to begin to seep. If no oil is seeping after about a minute of engine running, either you didn’t losen the galley bolt enough or you have some kind of oil pressure problem. Tighten the galley bolt.
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Checking the oil level. With the fresh oil in the bike take another couple of victory laps around the neighborhood to get the oil up everywhere in the motor where it’s supposed to go. Turn off the bike and let it sit for about 5 minutes. Use the dipstick to check the oil. Be sure the bike is straight up and down for this, not leaning on the kickstand. Just insert the dipstick gently, but don’t screw it in. The oil level should be mid way in the cross hatch area. Here the manual recommends removing the check bolt to see if any excess oil will come out and who am I to argue with the manual (see wrench in the pic below). Again, with the bike up and down no oil should be pouring out of the check bolt hole. Don't forget to tighten the check bolt when done checking.
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As a treat to yourself for the job well done go ahead and install that new beefy skidplate you ordered. You’re done!
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Edited by pickawinner, December 13, 2010 - 04:13 PM.


  • the_smoo

Posted December 12, 2010 - 05:23 AM

#2

very nice how to.. simple task but pictures always help!

  • projected

Posted December 12, 2010 - 08:31 AM

#3

Before I remove the filter cover I use a tie down strap and attach one end to my bench vise (or my truck) and the other end to the handle bar. Next I lean the bike to the right at about a 45 degree angle and use the tie down to hold the bike. Position the drain pan accordingly and remove the filter cover bolts. This allows all the oil from the filter to dump out without hitting the engine case, hose, etc.

  • Krannie McKranface

Posted December 12, 2010 - 10:58 AM

#4

Very good write up.

I might add that it's a good idea to clear the bottom hole in the case for the oil filter cover, of any debris, to prevent cross threading of the bolt.

  • gsa102

Posted December 13, 2010 - 06:31 AM

#5

Good Job! When you remove the first drain bolt, the oil will not shoot out unless the dipstick is loose at least a little bit to let air in.

  • gsa102

Posted December 13, 2010 - 06:32 AM

#6

What kind of skid plate is that, and where did you get it? I need to upgrade to one of those....

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • tribalbc

Posted December 13, 2010 - 06:55 AM

#7

Very good write up.

I might add that it's a good idea to clear the bottom hole in the case for the oil filter cover, of any debris, to prevent cross threading of the bolt.


To keep debris at a minimum on the bottom filter bolt I just barely crack all 3 filter bolts and let the oil from the filter drool slowly out from the filter cover rather than draining from the bottom bolt. I then clean with brake clean an put some grease on the bolt on reinstalation to protect the threads.
Bad design on Yamaha's part.

  • pickawinner

Posted December 13, 2010 - 07:58 AM

#8

What kind of skid plate is that, and where did you get it? I need to upgrade to one of those....


This is a Flatland skid plate that I ordered from CycleBuy.com (fast shipping, good phone support/service, not affiliated...). Moose Racing skid plate is another popular option here on TT. Do some searches here and on Google to see each and decide which you prefer.


Thanks everyone for your comments and suggestions. I was hoping this would generate additional tips and shortcuts from the more experienced. Though I have to say I didn't detect any debris/dirt problems in the area of the bottom oil filter cover bolt. Is it because I started with a very clean bike?

I too was thinking that the force of the oil stream can be reduced by keeping the oil fill cap and the dipstick closed. Will do that next time.

  • init ref

Posted December 13, 2010 - 03:38 PM

#9

Probably needs to read

...on a 2007 and later WR450F.

but other than that great write up. Pictures sure help.

  • grayracer513

Posted December 13, 2010 - 03:59 PM

#10

To keep debris at a minimum on the bottom filter bolt I just barely crack all 3 filter bolts and let the oil from the filter drool slowly out from the filter cover rather than draining from the bottom bolt. I then clean with brake clean an put some grease on the bolt on reinstalation to protect the threads.
Bad design on Yamaha's part.

The ultimate solution to this problem is to eliminate the path that such debris takes to get to the threads:

Read: http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=634724

  • tribalbc

Posted December 14, 2010 - 06:39 AM

#11

The ultimate solution to this problem is to eliminate the path that such debris takes to get to the threads:

Read: http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=634724


That does sound like the best solution and I am replacing my water pump and balancer shaft anyways....

Do you really think counter boring the hole is necessary? It's not like the ball bearing could go anywhere that way, 6mm bolt in a dead end hole stopping it. Staking on the top side makes sense though.

On another note I finally got all my parts together for my motor rebuild including that failed balancer shaft we talked about. I'll get you some bearing measurements on the balancer shaft and post it up for you on your water pump thread :thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted December 14, 2010 - 08:14 AM

#12

Do you really think counter boring the hole is necessary? It's not like the ball bearing could go anywhere that way, 6mm bolt in a dead end hole stopping it. Staking on the top side makes sense though.

Is there any valid reason not to counterbore it? No. Phobias about using a drill don't count. It's a complete piece of cake to do, and unless you find a ball that's sized closer to the current hole size, it's necessary.

Staking is actually overkill, since gravity and oil pressure are both at work to hold the ball in place, but it's technically correct to do it.

It can be safely done in place if you tape over the oil passages that are exposed (in the well and next to the bolt hole) and put a greased cotton swab in the threaded hole. Pick out any chips from the drilling before removing the swab. Really less hazardous than installing a Heli-Coil.

If you're worried you'll drill too deep, don't. You can limit how far the drill can go by slipping a piece of tubing over the bit, leaving only the desired hole depth exposed. Even if you drilled clear to the bottom, the worst case is that you would nick the threads a bit. Then you'd need to watch how far the ball was inserted, but that's it.

Trust me, this is a very easy operation to do, and you will absolutely love the results 7-8 oil changes down the road. :thumbsup:




 
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