Question: clean oil/dirty oil 2010


10 replies to this topic
  • Scrubba

Posted October 26, 2010 - 01:05 AM

#1

When i pull the oil drain bolt towards the front of the engine(below the filter)
it drains clear like brand new. then i remove the filter, same thing clear new oil draining from the filter cavity.

then, when i pull the drain bolt towards the rear of the engine, dirty, grey, almost black, thin oil, you can tell its been in the clutch/tranny.

So, why wouldnt all the oil look the same, being that there is only one supply for the engine/tranny?

This is on my 2010, after about 3 engine hours time.

  • bendover932

Posted October 26, 2010 - 04:47 AM

#2

I don't have a 2010... But that doesn't seem right....is this you first oil change? My 08 oil is always the same color in all three holes...The filter isn't going to recondition the oil putting golden oil back in the front of the motor...I'd have to think something was not circulating properly... But I'm not a tech I'd wait for others to confirm your situation before riding again though!

  • brentn

Posted October 26, 2010 - 10:47 AM

#3

Every time I have drained the oil I drain the front then the rear and they both always come out the same color.

This is because I start and run the bike prior and get it up to 90 degrees celcius before I change the oil. All the dirt that sits on the bottom of the engine is then suspended and comes out when you change the oil.
Are you doing the same thing?

  • Scrubba

Posted October 26, 2010 - 12:07 PM

#4

Every time I have drained the oil I drain the front then the rear and they both always come out the same color.

This is because I start and run the bike prior and get it up to 90 degrees celcius before I change the oil. All the dirt that sits on the bottom of the engine is then suspended and comes out when you change the oil.
Are you doing the same thing?


Thanks brentn, i think you nailed it. My belief is that if i drain it cold, then
all the sediment that has settled to the bottom will drain out, instead of circulating/coating it into the motor and staying there after draining.

Of course this is contrary to established practice, and maybe im just too lazy to start it up first.

thanks!

  • grayracer513

Posted October 26, 2010 - 12:56 PM

#5

It would actually be more likely to drain once it is suspended in the oil than while laying on the bottom.

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  • brentn

Posted October 26, 2010 - 02:49 PM

#6

It would actually be more likely to drain once it is suspended in the oil than while laying on the bottom.


Tis true.

If you were to pull the cases in theory after you drained it cold, you'd still see a nice amount of sediment on the bottom of the inside.
Grey I actually used to always drain my oil cold on my old bike, but until I read your post in the oil change procedure for the four strokes in the faq, I'm a changed man :excuseme:. Makes perfect sense!

Wouldn't be surprised if you get a longer life out of a bike that has it's oil changes done right after running versus one that's only changed when the bike is cold...

  • grayracer513

Posted October 26, 2010 - 02:57 PM

#7

There's another reason for that, too, and that is that when you restart the engine after an oil change it will pump no oil anywhere for up to as much as 15 seconds. This is because the feed oil reservoir is empty, and because the filter well is also empty (assuming you serviced the filter).

The oil is refilled into the sump, not the feed reservoir as in the '02 and earlier models (whose idea was that, I often wonder?), and so there is no oil going to the feed pump until enough has been pumped back to the oil "tank" for it to operate. Following that, it has to fill the oil filter cavity at least enough to force oil past it and out to the engine. When you run the engine before the oil change, you coat everything with a film of oil that will be there when you're done, and if don't go goon squad on the thing right after you start it, it will live through the experience none the worse for it.

  • Scrubba

Posted October 27, 2010 - 03:20 AM

#8

There's another reason for that, too, and that is that when you restart the engine after an oil change it will pump no oil anywhere for up to as much as 15 seconds. This is because the feed oil reservoir is empty, and because the filter well is also empty (assuming you serviced the filter).

The oil is refilled into the sump, not the feed reservoir as in the '02 and earlier models (whose idea was that, I often wonder?), and so there is no oil going to the feed pump until enough has been pumped back to the oil "tank" for it to operate. Following that, it has to fill the oil filter cavity at least enough to force oil past it and out to the engine. When you run the engine before the oil change, you coat everything with a film of oil that will be there when you're done, and if don't go goon squad on the thing right after you start it, it will live through the experience none the worse for it.


the thought did cross my mind a few times. dry start...
so, best to start up before draining, and start up right after filling too!
thanks, gray...

  • Jim813

Posted October 27, 2010 - 09:26 AM

#9

and if don't go goon squad on the thing


Is that a technical term?:excuseme:

  • grayracer513

Posted October 27, 2010 - 09:42 AM

#10

Is that a technical term?:excuseme:

Word picture. :smirk:

  • monkeymotocross

Posted October 28, 2010 - 08:15 PM

#11

i have never started my bike up to do an oil change





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