How much training?



21 replies to this topic
  • kmcbride

Posted February 17, 2001 - 09:47 AM

#21

Hey Rick,
Whenever the topic of diet and weight loss come up you will find lots of differing opinions and loads of unsubstantiated claims.
I have very strong opinions about diet and exercise, but only offer them when asked. A good place for anyone to start is the following link: www.msse.org This is the home page for The American College Of Sports Medicine. Click on "Positon Stands" and look at the first article on Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Although I don't agree 100% with this article, it is excellent, referencing 154 studies. If you can't get to it e-mail me and I will send it to you.

As far as consuming large volumes of water as a strategy for weight loss, I would strongly advise against it. Water consumption throughout the day is healthy and to some small degree may reduce hunger. But denying your body nutrition replaced with empty calories will likely fail over the long term. Keep in mind that fad diets and weight loss programs are almost always designed for a sedentary person. Trying to maintain these diets while training and rehabing a clavicle would be detrimental to your progress. Once you start exercising / riding / training regularly you need to shift focus on what nutrition is all about: A fuel and recovery source for your body. This is actually true for sedantary individuals, but good luck getting them to believe it. Food is your friend, LOL. Follow some of the basics in the article as far as portions go, continue training and let the weight take care of itself. If you restrict your caloric intake too much you will see a decline in your ability to train and perform. Professional athletes never try to lose weight "in season". Any attempt to drop some weight should be done off season, which is now for most of us in the northeast U.S. In your case, since you were sidelined so long with a fracture clavicle, the simple addition of your exercise program should be enough to cut some pounds combined with sensible eating.

Some basics for weight loss when training:
1) If you are dropping more than 1-2 pounds a week be cautious, studies have shown much more than this is eating into your lean muscle mass, something you want to keep.
2) Eating several (4-6) smaller meals a day has been shown to be an effective strategy for minor weight loss. This is actually a good way to eat regardless of your goals.
3) Focus your bigger meals around your work-out. Consuming your largest meal of the day (carb/protein mix) following (1-2hours) a work-out has been proven to aid in recovery. I would try to get some carbs in while working -out or immediately after (apple, orange, baked potato, sport drink, powerbar, etc.)
4) Cutting fat below 15% of total caloric intake does not improve athletic performance.
To the contrary, as you increase your endurance you will burn a larger percentage of fat when riding and woking-out aerobically. Of course for health reasons
saturated fats should be kept to a minimum.
5) Diet changes should reflect lifestyle changes as they are better to stick with you for the long hull and prevent the yo-yo effect.
6) Stick with the weights as lean muscle mass is your best calorie burner you have.
7) Throw in some higher intensity aerobics which has been shown to shift resting and exercising metabolism.
8) Weight loss is usually not a linear progression, as you drop weight it will become harder to take it off. Laws of physics working here.
9) It you are really serious go to a registered dietitian for advise. Nothing against nutritionist, because there are good ones, but anybody can call themselves a nutritionist.
10) The latest crazes, Atkins and the Zone diets, although based on some sound theories, and despite their claims are getting holes poked in them with the latest research and are less than ideal for someone in training.

I could go on, but I do not want to offend anyone. BTW, as I said before I enjoy these topics and I welcome any varying opinions on the subjects and would be more than happy to discuss issues in the area of exercise and nutrition. I try to stay on top of the latest research and base most of my opinions on tested theories. We all know that research has its limitations (we don't live in a lab) and generalizing results to everyone is ill advised. I am open to individual methods of training and diet. Got to run, today I am helping my riding buddy break in his new WR250. Power feels O.K. but not for the 200 pound plus club!

[This message has been edited by kmcbride (edited 02-17-2001).]

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  • Scott_F

Posted February 17, 2001 - 08:05 PM

#22

Keith, another interesting post. You invited comments, so here's a few.

I'm sure that you know that water has NO calories.

1) People need to realize that it takes years to put on extra body fat, and it can't disappear overnight. The problem is the American "instant gratification" culture. That's why they try nonsense like liposuction and diets.

4) Most people would have to make drastic changes to get anywhere near as low as 15% of total calories from fat.

5) The only permanent solution is permanent diet and lifestyle changes. The whole concept of "diets" is dead wrong.

9) A better option is to educate yourself. Visit your nearest Whole Foods or other health food store and buy some nutrition books. Eat according to the Food Pyramid.

Bon Appetite!


Originally posted by kmcbride:
Water consumption throughout the day is healthy and to some small degree may reduce hunger. But denying your body nutrition replaced with empty calories will likely fail over the long term.

Some basics for weight loss when training:

1) If you are dropping more than 1-2 pounds a week be cautious, studies have shown much more than this is eating into your lean muscle mass, something you want to keep.

4) Cutting fat below 15% of total caloric intake does not improve athletic performance.
To the contrary, as you increase your endurance you will burn a larger percentage of fat when riding and woking-out aerobically. Of course for health reasons
saturated fats should be kept to a minimum.

5) Diet changes should reflect lifestyle changes as they are better to stick with you for the long hull and prevent the yo-yo effect.

9) It you are really serious go to a registered dietitian for advise. Nothing against nutritionist, because there are good ones, but anybody can call themselves a nutritionist.







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