Soaked YZ426F (stream crossing)


9 replies to this topic
  • swilson143

Posted July 26, 2010 - 10:21 PM

#1

Well that new 2000 YZ426F I bought is no longer a virgin. Been riding it for two days while on a camping trip. All was good today until crossing a stream. It was my forth time across and I stupidly decided to try a new line across. The front tire climbed a large submerged rock and then dropped into a hole, high centering me. The fast current pulled me down to the right. For 2-3 seconds most of the bike was under water. I wasn't able to kill the motor as I fell, but it stopped on its own quickly.

So after dragging the bike and myself out of the creek I lifted the bike by the front wheel and watched the water pour out of the muffler. Then pulled the decomp lever and kicked forever trying to move any water it had swallowed out the other end. Once I was pretty sure any water was now out of the intake and engine I began to try and start it. No sign of water in the oil and no cooling system damage. First 15 minutes it wasn't even pretending to try and start. After 40 minutes it would sputter for not more than 5 sec and die. Any throttle input would kill it even quicker. Then my wife brought my truck from camp and I brought the bike back to camp.

At camp I kept trying and eventually it would run 10 seconds and then finally came to life sputtering and spewing water out the tailpipe. I guess the batting was still soaked. If this ever happens again would you recommend putting the bike standing on its rear wheel for a prolonged time to let the batting drain better?

Once running I putted down the road for 20 minutes until I was sure even the batting was all dried out. Its acting like itself again, thank goodness.

Scraped the rear swingarm, front fender plastic, and punctured the right grip allowing lots of silt into the right grip. I've already cleaned and reassembled the grip/throttle. All in all it could have been much worse.

So what do you guys do after drowning your bikes? And anything besides the normal oil change and lube everything when i get home? Oh I also lubed the chain since.

Thanks,
Scott

  • ttr250dude

Posted July 27, 2010 - 01:32 AM

#2

I think you might have gotten lucky on that one, alot of times when a motor sucks in water it hydro locks - bad news. Most guys that have this happen change their oil every 30 mins or so a few times to flush out all the moisture that couldve gotten in there. I personally would get all the moisture out of all the electical connections, drain out all the gas, and regrease everything. You really need to do this asap to prevent any possible corrosion. I havent had this happen to me, this is just from what ive read and heard from people so take it with a grain of salt.

  • cowboyona426

Posted July 27, 2010 - 06:29 AM

#3

The solution to this is simple- don't take your bike swimming anymore! :smirk: You took all the right steps to clear it out. I've seen people flip a bike upside down after submerging (sitting on the ground on the bars/seat) and kick the engine over to pump the water out but can't recall ever seeing it done on a 4 stroke. Most of your problems were probably from a water logged air filter- if it happens again remove the filter and gently squeeze the water out (while trying not to squeeze out much of the oil).

  • Ryan426

Posted July 27, 2010 - 10:29 AM

#4

+1 on grease it all.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 27, 2010 - 11:05 AM

#5

Lots of posts on this. Search a bit:

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  • swilson143

Posted July 27, 2010 - 12:31 PM

#6

Thanks! I'll start greasing when get to our next campsite tonight.

  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted July 28, 2010 - 02:32 PM

#7

When I drowned my WR (the first time), I removed the tank then the plug. While I was letting the plug dry out, I kicked and kicked until all the water blew out through the spark plug hole.

I wrung out the air filter, drained the gas from the float bowl and put the plug back in after spraying it with some WD40. I also had to remove the water trapped in the air boot. It started to show some signs of life after that. It did initially run for only 5 seconds at a time, but was sputtering badly and blowing water out the back. After about 10 or 12 times of this, it eventually ran.

I rode the rest of that day and some the next day. When I drained the oil, very little water was in it.

I think you were doing the right things. It took me almost and hour to get it running

  • swilson143

Posted July 31, 2010 - 11:24 AM

#8

Well I rechecked the oil when I got to my next camp... it was milk. I guess the previous time I checked it must have been before I had the motor running. I changed the oil, let it idle 10 minutes, and reapeated. 4th oil change finally looked about normal, so I did two more. Its a happy motor again.

Found a couple drops of water on each axle, but wasn't able to pull the bearings out since my bearing puller was way too big. I left it open for awhile so any more drops could evaporate. Ill buy a smaller bearing puller when I get home.

  • brentn

Posted August 01, 2010 - 01:16 PM

#9

I find the carb is really sensitive to water, and it doesn't go away quickly until you properly drain it out. Pull the float bowl screw next time and let it drain, put the screw back in and turn on the petcock, turn off petcock and drain ONCE more just to get all the water out. Try kicking it over then and getting it going, I think you'll find that you'll save yourself 40 minutes of trying to turn it over! :banana:

COuld be worse though, you could have been WOT and sucked in water just destroying the engine...

  • cowboyona426

Posted August 02, 2010 - 07:02 AM

#10

I find the carb is really sensitive to water, and it doesn't go away quickly until you properly drain it out. Pull the float bowl screw next time and let it drain, put the screw back in and turn on the petcock, turn off petcock and drain ONCE more just to get all the water out. Try kicking it over then and getting it going, I think you'll find that you'll save yourself 40 minutes of trying to turn it over! :banana:

COuld be worse though, you could have been WOT and sucked in water just destroying the engine...

Pull 2 of the vent lines from the carb up into the airbox, that way when the drain tubes go under water the carb can still breathe (unless you are in water up to the seat :eek:) It saves a lot of trouble.





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