Mountain and Dirt Bikers-divide and conquer



6 replies to this topic
  • mikeolichney

Posted January 25, 2001 - 06:27 PM

#1

I have been an dedicated mountain biker much longer than I have been a dirt biker. I know alot of you also ride Mtn Bikes. The BLM has just released a new management plan in which they seperated the mountain bike from the OHV at the last minute. So the BLM distinction is now "motorized" rather than "mechanized". The International Mountain Bike Assosiation worked hard to get this distinction implemented. New regulations that come along can now affect each seperately.

I think this is bad news. The IMBA should realize that we (dirt bikes) are the canary in the coal mine for the mountain bike. We stand a much better chance against the fruits and nuts in California if we are united.

I recognize that there are two types of mountain bikers. There are the yuppie recreationalists who scoff at burning gasoline for fun (never mind that they vaporized more dead dinosaurs hauling their bikes to the trailhead than I will all day on my yamaha). Then there are the crossover types that love two wheeled recreation, motorized or not. When you meet up with mountain bikers on the trails, it becomes clear who is who. Try to be polite anyway. In this case the enemy of our enemy is our friend. The mtn bike community needs to be on our side.

I periodically visit the Sierra Club website to see what is up. Make no mistake-if the SC ever squashes us, the mountain bike is next. There are lots of articles on the website like the following:

Bikes Do Not Make Right
Court Upholds Reason in Marin Mountain Bike Regulations

Once again, the Bay Area has set a precedent for the country. A federal
appeals court on May 6 upheld the Club's position in our famous "biker-hiker"
conflict. The ruling upheld the regulations on bicycle use issued "through a
careful and rigorous rulemaking" by the Golden Gate National Recreation Area,
and provides a model for settling the mountain bike conflicts that started
here and have spread through the U.S.

The Sierra Club led five environmental groups that joined the federal lawsuit
on the side of the U.S. Park Service.

Some Marin bicyclists and biking groups, including the International Mountain
Biking Association, contend that because they are a sizable group, they have
a right to demand that federal parks meet their recreational needs. We've
seen that same argument used to justify trails built secretly and illegally
on public open space in remote areas of Marin.

The court resoundingly rejected the argument that the bigger a group is, the
greater its right to recreate wherever it wishes.

The court found no laws requiring that "some recreational opportunities be
given primacy over other types." Instead, it is appropriate for management to
"temper recreational uses by its concern for resource protection and visitor
safety." No portion of the park has been shut off, but we will need to leave
our wheeled vehicles behind when we venture into some of the more sensitive
areas and narrow trails.

Here in Marin, we so often forget that nature doesn't exist solely for our
use. Nature's not a video game for us to win.

The problem here? Too many bicycles going too fast in too many places.
Mountain bikes allow riders to go more than five times faster than on foot.
Traveling more than five times as far in our open spaces in a comparable
time, they intrude on more than five times as much habitat.

In a time of exploding population and decreasing resources, we must limit our
personal wants for the sake of protecting our irreplaceable resources. The
court described an open and fair process for doing that.

Jeff Golden, Chapter chair

  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted January 25, 2001 - 07:01 PM

#2

As a non-yuppie, non-LBZ crossover type that rides road and mountain bikes as well as My YZ400 and a Banshee, I understand and suport everything you said. I want to enjoy every part of this earth without spoiling it. My problem is I don't mind sharing, in fact I encourage it, I just get very upset at the people who feel it is their right to spoil the land or keep it for their own. Please remember we are in a fight for every bit of free space left on this earth, so be kind to everyone you see on the trail and give them respect and some space.

  • dirtdad

Posted January 26, 2001 - 03:50 AM

#3

The main thing we ALL need to realize here is that we ALL need to be involved in selling our activities as not being a threat. Wether you ride, hunt, fish, hike or anything else on the land that is still open to these activities, you must get involved in preserving it and the opportunity to enjoy it. Far too many people view participants in these activities as a cliche. Mostly as flannel shirt, suspender clad, beer guzzling, rebel flag on our pick-up hicks (no offense Hick) who tear up the land and litter while we do it. If you think you can sit back and watch just because the activity being criticised or attacked is not your interest, you are fooling yourself. They are all related and rest assured that sooner or later, they will get around to your activity that you hold near and dear.
By the time you realize that you're under attack, it'll probably be too late!

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • MikeOK

Posted January 26, 2001 - 05:23 AM

#4

I've been mountain biking up in the CO mountains every summer for years now. Me and a friend were up there once a few years back and after a few days of rumbling around the hills we stumbled into Vail. We prolly looked like a couple of hillbillies since we had been camping and living on the trails for a few days. Needless to say, the preppy little park rangers didn't want us on their trails. Turns out that in that area they are "non mechanized" trails only- meaning only foot travel. Bummer. I can understand that we need lands that are protected but just how much land? There are places up there that see very little traffic and could support more without adverse effects.

Anyway, we headed down and eventuallu made it to Crested Butte where we fit in just fine lol.

  • mikeolichney

Posted January 26, 2001 - 07:19 AM

#5

Originally posted by MikeOK:
I've been mountain biking up in the CO mountains every summer for years now. Me and a friend were up there once a few years back and after a few days of rumbling around the hills we stumbled into Vail. We prolly looked like a couple of hillbillies since we had been camping and living on the trails for a few days. Needless to say, the preppy little park rangers didn't want us on their trails. Turns out that in that area they are "non mechanized" trails only- meaning only foot travel. Bummer. I can understand that we need lands that are protected but just how much land? There are places up there that see very little traffic and could support more without adverse effects.

Anyway, we headed down and eventuallu made it to Crested Butte where we fit in just fine lol.



  • mikeolichney

Posted January 26, 2001 - 07:31 AM

#6

Unfortunately around Crested Butte trails are being closed down to both Mtn bikes and dirt bikes. The mtn bikes lost O be Joyful area recently. It became a designated non-mechanized area. Horses and Hikers only-never mind that they cause erosion too. The parks and wilderness areas are off limits to anything with wheels. I agree that some hikers don't like bikes but have you seen how much area is reserved just for them? Near my house there is an area called Hall Ranch. Half the trails are reserved for foot and horses only. The ranger was in the parking lot taking a count-there were 35 on mtn bikes and only four on foot. Is it fair that those four get half the trails to themnselves-never mind that the entire park is open to them? When trails are closed to bikes it puts more use on the trails that remain open-exactly what is going on with dirt bikes. The SC crowd points at the erosion as proof to how damaging wheels are.

  • MikeOK

Posted January 28, 2001 - 05:42 AM

#7

mikeo- say it aint so! When we were at Crested Butte last we could ride anywhere. They were having a cross-country trail ride while we were there and while we were mountain biking we saw dirt bikes all over those mountains, made me want to come back with mine. How abot the Salida area? We've spent some time there too and it was open to about anything last time I was there. We rode a long ride down the continental divide there once- what an epic trip! That time it was during elk season and we saw lots of off-roaders there...

Mike





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