Blown fork seal repair cost


19 replies to this topic
  • YZrider2112

Posted June 25, 2010 - 10:24 AM

#1

My 03 YZ125 has a blown fork seal, and being as I've never tried to fix one before I'm kind of thinking about just taking the fork in to the repair shop. I just called the shop up the street from me and they said that they would do one fork for $100 and two forks for $150. Is that a decent price? I really wasn't sure.

And while I'm at it, should I do both or am I okay to just do one? The one seal is totally blown and there was oil everywhere, but the other fork leg looks completely normal.

Thanks,
Randy

EDIT: And I looked up how to do it myself, and to be honest it looked to be a little bit over my mechanical ability. I just want to be sure that it's going to be done right and if I do it myself I'll be questioning it.

  • locorider

Posted June 25, 2010 - 10:36 AM

#2

The parts you need will run about $35-$40 for both forks, that includes oil. You need a seal driver or a pvc home made one.

Up to you how much you want to pay for labor but I would suggest you look at doing it yourself. It is a lot more intimidating than anything else. It will probably take you an hour for the first one and 15 minutes for the second one.

For a professional it should not be more than 15 minutes per shock if they are already removed from the bike. So $100 for 30 minutes worth of labor seems a little steep but I don't know the going rates.

  • ajd187

Posted June 25, 2010 - 10:39 AM

#3

I would say do it yourself, but if you don't want to, that is a good price. Definitely do both.

It is really not that bad. Admittedly buying the proper tools to do it, along with parts and oil, will cost you almost as much as sending it out to be done, but you know it was done the right way.

Look on Youtube for rockymountainatvmc. They have great videos on how to do this.

If you do send it out I might look into a different shop. If they are willing to only fix one then I sort of question their abilities, you should always do both.

  • YZrider2112

Posted June 25, 2010 - 10:42 AM

#4

I would say do it yourself, but if you don't want to, that is a good price. Definitely do both.

It is really not that bad. Admittedly buying the proper tools to do it, along with parts and oil, will cost you almost as much as sending it out to be done, but you know it was done the right way.

Look on Youtube for rockymountainatvmc. They have great videos on how to do this.

If you do send it out I might look into a different shop. If they are willing to only fix one then I sort of question their abilities, you should always do both.

Well the guy said he really recommends doing both at the same time. I dunno, maybe I'll look up those videos and see if I can do it...I can't really screw it up beyond repair, can I?

  • HodaddyB

Posted June 25, 2010 - 10:44 AM

#5

I could see $100 if they have to remove and replace the fork, and the oil and seal are included.
If your forks haven't been serviced in a while, your money may be best spent having them serviced w/ new seals installed.
If somebody just wants a fork seal replaced w/ no other cleaning/inspection, I charge $50 (per fork)which includes oil but does NOT include removal/reistallation of the fork on the bike. There can be quite a range of fork seal prices so I generally don't inlude them in a "package deal".
Find out what exactly you get for the $150. It may be a decent price depending on how much they do.

  • YZrider2112

Posted June 25, 2010 - 11:02 AM

#6

I could see $100 if they have to remove and replace the fork, and the oil and seal are included.
If your forks haven't been serviced in a while, your money may be best spent having them serviced w/ new seals installed.
If somebody just wants a fork seal replaced w/ no other cleaning/inspection, I charge $50 (per fork)which includes oil but does NOT include removal/reistallation of the fork on the bike. There can be quite a range of fork seal prices so I generally don't inlude them in a "package deal".
Find out what exactly you get for the $150. It may be a decent price depending on how much they do.


No, he said it would be about 50 bucks more if I brought the whole bike in; the prices in the OP are if I bring just the forks in. And the forks haven't been serviced in a while, so maybe it would be worth it if they'll do it?

I was going to send the forks in somewhere to get them revalved and all that good stuff, but I'm kind of outgrowing the bike so I'm having trouble spending the cash.

  • ForsheeMS

Posted June 25, 2010 - 12:15 PM

#7

A revalve will work wonders for those forks. The 03 YZ was really harsh in the mid stroke but if you're not planning on keeping the bike there's no need in spending that money. Just replacing the old, worn out oil will make a big difference so I would recommend having both serviced while you're at it.

  • john484

Posted June 25, 2010 - 03:56 PM

#8

that seems high to me. I know you are sick of hearing this but if you plan to be riding dirtbikes for awhile it would behoove you to bite the bullet and buy the few tools and learn to do it yourself, fork seals on dirtbikes are a wear item and you will be in your forks a lot if you do any amount of riding. youtube has good how-to vids and you will more than pay for the tools the first time.
but having said that, only you know your comfort level with doing them. If you do farm it out, be picky about who does them, just like any wrenchwork.

  • NP4M

Posted June 25, 2010 - 07:58 PM

#9

You aren't alone with your reluctance to try it. I have turned every nut and bolt on my bike, top and bottom ends, but won't go near my suspension. I just had mine done again and got to watch him do it, I was shocked at how simple it was! I'm not exactly going to start doing it next week, but it wasn't as bad as I thought.

While it is at the shop, a re-valve (if needed) and full service with new bushings and such should be done. Where in CA are you?

  • YZrider2112

Posted June 25, 2010 - 08:18 PM

#10

You aren't alone with your reluctance to try it. I have turned every nut and bolt on my bike, top and bottom ends, but won't go near my suspension. I just had mine done again and got to watch him do it, I was shocked at how simple it was! I'm not exactly going to start doing it next week, but it wasn't as bad as I thought.

While it is at the shop, a re-valve (if needed) and full service with new bushings and such should be done. Where in CA are you?


Well as much as I'd love to get it revalved, I'm probably gonna be on a new bike by the time next season rolls around (YZ250!!), so I don't know if I'll be able to spend the money.

I am in Orange County; Huntington Beach/Westminster area to be more specific.

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  • 7thirtyseven

Posted June 25, 2010 - 11:18 PM

#11

So if your going to sell it.... Save yourself all the money, take a strip of 35mm film slideit around between the fork and oil seal ( not the dust seal) dig out all the goop, throw some lithium grease in the dust seal and ride away. If the fork is so neglected the oil seal is "blown" just new seals won't help you'll need bushings etc.

  • YZrider2112

Posted June 25, 2010 - 11:24 PM

#12

So if your going to sell it.... Save yourself all the money, take a strip of 35mm film slideit around between the fork and oil seal ( not the dust seal) dig out all the goop, throw some lithium grease in the dust seal and ride away. If the fork is so neglected the oil seal is "blown" just new seals won't help you'll need bushings etc.

No, my little brother will be taking the bike over next season. I just can't justify spending a bunch of cash on setting the suspension up when he hardly rides.

  • jwaseman

Posted June 26, 2010 - 03:35 AM

#13

Yzrider,


150 is not bad. As long as they are cleaning the entire system and replacing the bushings and such. It can be a time consuming job cleaning everything up. They probably want to do both forks to get the oil height correct for each. Remember, he is using cleaner, the proper tools and setting oil height.
If the shop says they can do the job under an hour for both forks. RUN!
They are short cutting somewhere (IMHO) just my .02

jwaseman

  • jwaseman

Posted June 26, 2010 - 03:41 AM

#14

I should mention this, go on Youtube and search for fork seal replacement.
you will see the whole procedure. If you are planning on riding forever, this is one area you will want to do yourself. You have an open cartridge fork or sometimes called open bath. Do a search! You can do it! My advice is, buy a seal driver. You will have it forever to do forks with. Granted if you buy a newer YZ, the tube diameter changed from 46mm to 48 mm. Yours is 46mm
slider. 04 and up are 48mm.:)

  • NP4M

Posted June 26, 2010 - 06:10 AM

#15

You have a couple good suspension shops right around that area. Personally, I think that is a lot for a seal replacement. Since it is a relatively simple thing to do, and you aren't looking for more service, call around and see if the other local shops are better priced.

  • YZrider2112

Posted June 26, 2010 - 10:00 AM

#16

You have a couple good suspension shops right around that area. Personally, I think that is a lot for a seal replacement. Since it is a relatively simple thing to do, and you aren't looking for more service, call around and see if the other local shops are better priced.


Do you have any recommendations for other shops? I am going to call around and check on the prices. I may see if I can do it myself but if someone can do it for a good price, I might still do that

Thanks for all your input, guys.

  • gruberyz

Posted June 26, 2010 - 10:03 AM

#17

do it yourself. If you can send a text message you can change fork seals and bushings. Now a WP cartridge fork I'd recommend having experince first. A Kayaba or Showa super easy. I'd rather change a fork seal on our bikes than put a plug in some of them.

  • NP4M

Posted June 26, 2010 - 12:37 PM

#18

Enzo Racing in Santa Ana
Pro Valve in Costa Mesa
Fineline in HB
There is also the Yamaha dealer in town if you want to risk them.

Most places are going to want to sell you on a lot more though, stuff like worn bushings and new springs and stuff like that. There is a very valid point to them doing so. If you are looking at a full re-valve and all, I am happy with who did mine. The guy I used was Travis with TBT and he has a fully loaded van/workshop and did my suspension right at my house.

Based on what I have seen and what everyone else has said, it might be worth trying it yourself.

  • HodaddyB

Posted June 26, 2010 - 12:49 PM

#19

Yzrider,


150 is not bad. As long as they are cleaning the entire system and replacing the bushings and such. It can be a time consuming job cleaning everything up. They probably want to do both forks to get the oil height correct for each. Remember, he is using cleaner, the proper tools and setting oil height.
If the shop says they can do the job under an hour for both forks. RUN!
They are short cutting somewhere (IMHO) just my .02

jwaseman


:)

  • brentn

Posted June 26, 2010 - 04:11 PM

#20

When I did mine I did not have a seal driver, and found a much better method of dropping the outer bushing and fork seal into the outer tube.

Using a propane torch, heat up the outside of the outer tube where the outer bushing will be pressed in. Using a piece of PVC plastic pipe that is cut into a 1/4 curve slowly angle it onto the bushing and start pressing in the edges. Without the tube heated up this part will require the driver, but with heat it will just slide in. To fully seat it tap it in lightly at an angle with a hammer until it is fully seated.
Do the same thing with the fork seal that goes on right after, lightly seat it in. It basically goes in just past the retaining clip recession, once you have reached that point where you can put the retaining clip into place, your set.

The price you were quoted though, is a fair and average labor charge for this job, but if you do it yourself make sure you read some guides on the net, along with watching the rockymountainatvmc videos on youtube to give you a general idea. If you have dual chamber forks, you do not have to get into the inner chamber at all, you can leave it alone and just do the outer chamber where the seal resides.

Using my method I've had my seals installed on the bike for over 20 hours now and no signs of any leaks.





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