Need help with picking a chain!!


32 replies to this topic
  • grayracer513

Posted April 12, 2010 - 05:59 AM

#21

The DID erv-3 has a tensile strength 1000lbs. higher than the Regina. 7642 for the Regina and 8660 for the DID.

Tensile strength is one of the least important, yet overemphasized factors in chain selection. Anything over around 5000 pounds is adequate for a YZ450, a fact borne out by the extremely small number of chains that you see actually snap in two. Wear resistance is what makes them last.

Well, I rode yesterday with my new Regina chain and I can pretty much tell that the next chain I buy will be a Regina ORN6. Two hours of riding and it needs to be adjusted already.

This is to be expected with any new chain, and the fact is it probably needed adjustment in the first 30 minutes. If you treat it right it won't need it again for a very long time.

  • Gunner354

Posted April 12, 2010 - 07:08 AM

#22

I'll stick with the stronger DID chain that has also over 300 hrs on it and original sprockets.
If tensile strength isn't that important than why are they listed?

  • grayracer513

Posted April 12, 2010 - 09:14 AM

#23

Some applications may actually require that much strength. A 450 MX doesn't. A lot of why they list some of that stuff is the same reason they plate the outer plates a gold color.

  • KJ790

Posted April 12, 2010 - 09:24 AM

#24

Another vote for the regina ORN6 chain. I've been running them for years, great chain. Tensile strength is listed in advertisements for the same reason exhaust companies advertise peak hp numbers, because the majority or people are brainwashed into thinking that those are the most important and/or the only useful information in determining how good the product is.

  • grayracer513

Posted April 12, 2010 - 09:34 AM

#25

Tensile strength is listed in advertisements for the same reason exhaust companies advertise peak hp numbers, because the majority or people are brainwashed into thinking that those are the most important and/or the only useful information in determining how good the product is.

In fairness, wear resistance is much harder to quantify in numerical terms. There's no standard way to represent it that I'm aware of, which leaves tensile strength as one of the only ways to compare overall quality in that way.

The trouble is that, a) a roller chain does not depend very much on very hard or durable inner sleeves or outer rollers for high tensile numbers, and :thumbsup: tensile strength can be increased by simply adding bulk, the way many of the cheap chains do it.

  • Gunner354

Posted April 12, 2010 - 10:52 AM

#26

300 + hours on DID erv3 and original
sprockets speaks for itself. Sorry but you will never convince me to switch. Have a great day!

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • shrubitup

Posted April 12, 2010 - 11:38 AM

#27

Have a great day!


You too! :thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted April 12, 2010 - 08:19 PM

#28

Sorry but you will never convince me to switch.

No one wants you to switch. However, anyone shopping for a chain may want to consider this: I just replaced the ORN6 that I installed on the '06 I bought for myself. The chain was installed on the original sprockets after they had run less than 4 hours under the OEM chain (I bought the bike in September '07 with two rides on it). That's about two and a half years of desert racing and recreational riding. The reason the chain was replaced was that it was worn on the top and bottom from dragging over the chain guide (complete with sand, etc.) to the point where the plates were down to near the rollers, and a few links were beginning to tighten. The front sprocket had significant wear, but the rear is actually still usable. The chain is "stretched" about 1% longer than new.

The other consideration is that you get all that for $88 at the TT Store, as opposed to $185 for the ERV3.

Your choice.

  • 426 NOOB

Posted April 12, 2010 - 09:54 PM

#29

The other consideration is that you get all that for $88 at the TT Store, as opposed to $185 for the ERV3.

Your choice.


holy crap, i would never pay $185 for a chain, i don't care how long it lasts. That is outrageous.

  • crf450319

Posted April 13, 2010 - 07:41 AM

#30

The other consideration is that you get all that for $88 at the TT Store, as opposed to $185 for the ERV3.

Your choice.


I paid $113 for my ERV3 shipping incl., there's a seller on E-bay who's got them for $127 shipped (120 link ERV3) :
http://cgi.ebay.com/...sQ5fAccessories

$185 may be retail, but who in their right mind pays that these days ? Retail for the ORN6 is around $97.

  • grayracer513

Posted April 13, 2010 - 10:16 AM

#31

$185 may be retail, but who in their right mind pays that these days ? Retail for the ORN6 is around $97.

Retail on the ERV3 is listed at $205.95. $185 is the going rate at typical online discount houses, picked at random from a web search for the chain. I haven't paid anything like $97 for an ORN6 at any time, either.

  • Gunner354

Posted April 13, 2010 - 02:28 PM

#32

I paid $113 for my ERV3 shipping incl., there's a seller on E-bay who's got them for $127 shipped (120 link ERV3) :
http://cgi.ebay.com/...sQ5fAccessories

$185 may be retail, but who in their right mind pays that these days ? Retail for the ORN6 is around $97.


Did we not read this post?
Sounds like someone elses idea or reference is not good or allowed. That's sad.

  • grayracer513

Posted April 13, 2010 - 02:36 PM

#33

I quoted it, what makes you think I didn't read it?





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