2010 reliability


50 replies to this topic
  • krony506

Posted January 23, 2010 - 05:31 AM

#21

i have no idea as i dont own them. but unlike the yami, dont honda/kaw/suzu all need laptops for the tuners? its a computer program you plug into the bike, not a hand held unit like yami?


You are correct and I think Yamaha just set the standard with there programmer.

  • ProMed

Posted January 23, 2010 - 07:38 AM

#22

i have no idea as i dont own them. but unlike the yami, dont honda/kaw/suzu all need laptops for the tuners? its a computer program you plug into the bike, not a hand held unit like yami?


You are correct and I think Yamaha just set the standard with there programmer.

I thought the Kawasaki programmer was hand-held? Could be wrong though..

  • NMdesertRacer

Posted January 23, 2010 - 09:03 AM

#23

Yamahas the only one with a hand held unit all the others use laptops.

  • FinchFan194

Posted January 23, 2010 - 11:43 AM

#24

I thought the Kawasaki programmer was hand-held? Could be wrong though..


I thought so too. I know they have something like that might have to be used in conjunction with a laptop maybe. . .I dunno.

  • Frank_z28

Posted January 23, 2010 - 12:08 PM

#25

Thanks for the input guys. On an other note how long it take to change the air filter? From the pic i saw you need to remove seat,tank,fender... sound lame to me

  • Scrubba

Posted January 23, 2010 - 12:20 PM

#26

Thanks for the input guys. On an other note how long it take to change the air filter? From the pic i saw you need to remove seat,tank,fender... sound lame to me


actually a lot easier than a conventional filter.

remove seat, then two bolts, then flip the tank back(its on hinges), two small bolts to remove cover, unclip the cage and remove the flat filter.

no need to fit the filter over the cage and work the cage into its place, like the old style when installing. just put the cage over it, snap it in, and put everything back on.

easier to clean, and not prone to tearing at the seams(no seams).

  • Mike546

Posted January 23, 2010 - 02:26 PM

#27

actually a lot easier than a conventional filter.

remove seat, then two bolts, then flip the tank back(its on hinges), two small bolts to remove cover, unclip the cage and remove the flat filter.

no need to fit the filter over the cage and work the cage into its place, like the old style when installing. just put the cage over it, snap it in, and put everything back on.

easier to clean, and not prone to tearing at the seams(no seams).


Do you leave the tether for the tank on the bike? I hang mine on the wall in the garage, I really can't see why I would need it at the track. Your right about the filter change being pretty easy, unless your coming off of a KTM, they have the best set up. I did have a problem getting the lower oil filter bolt back in. It was hard to get it started with big oily fingers.

  • Scrubba

Posted January 23, 2010 - 03:12 PM

#28

Do you leave the tether for the tank on the bike? I hang mine on the wall in the garage, I really can't see why I would need it at the track. Your right about the filter change being pretty easy, unless your coming off of a KTM, they have the best set up. I did have a problem getting the lower oil filter bolt back in. It was hard to get it started with big oily fingers.


no i leave the teather in my toolbx. actually, where does the free end supposed to connect to?(not the tank end)

as for lower oil filter bolt, get a set of T handles best bet.

  • Mike546

Posted January 23, 2010 - 05:00 PM

#29

I meant the lower drain bolt not the filter bolt, my bad.

  • matt116

Posted January 23, 2010 - 05:57 PM

#30

Scrubba quote: actually, where does the free end supposed to connect to?(not the tank end)

You loop it around a cross support on the sub frame slip knot style.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • honda597

Posted February 01, 2010 - 01:41 AM

#31

so far what ihave seen and heard the 2010 rmz may be the best 450 ever .Since 05 the rest of the OEM's have all tried to mach the rmz handling with little or no luck. the draw back was a weaker motor and a heavie over all weight, it seams like they are dealing with those so 2010 rmz may be the best yet hope fully its more reliable than the 2010 yamaha it looks great but fuel in the gear oil and grenading motors at 10 hrs 2 reports of cracke frame welds i guess the yz 450f didnt set the bar very high glad i wated to buy a new bike but the 05 is still running strong

I was just wondering if i have missed something with the new bike.
http://www.thumperta...744&postcount=4

Broken welds, blown engines, fuel in oil:excuseme:
I cant seem to find any info on this.:ride:

  • APlusAutoParts

Posted February 01, 2010 - 05:05 AM

#32

I just got mine last week and still haven't rode it yet. All i can tell you is if you buy it look up the posts on problems with the bike and read what they say to do starting it. After spending a half hour starting mine last week and hurting my knee. I joined this forum and did what you guys said and it now starts on the 3rd kick.

  • moto278

Posted February 01, 2010 - 02:49 PM

#33

well ive had mine a couple months. but with winter hear nd over a foot of snow on the ground, riding is a definate treat. i have raced it once indoors, and put mayb 2 hours on the bike is all. but so far, no cracks and no gas in oil. it has sat 2 weeks now with the gas in the tank and i need to drain it til i can ride more. but ive always had great reliability with my yamahas. just me tho. and havent heard anything on anyone elses '10 yz450 breakin down

  • BBrown626

Posted February 01, 2010 - 08:06 PM

#34

i have no idea as i dont own them. but unlike the yami, dont honda/kaw/suzu all need laptops for the tuners? its a computer program you plug into the bike, not a hand held unit like yami?


Isn't the use of a laptop a good thing? The tuner costs a lot of $$$ for a single function. They should put the software in the processor and allow you to run it via telnet/console as lots of modern industrial gizmos work.

  • rickallen124

Posted February 01, 2010 - 09:43 PM

#35

Not when you have to carry an extra battery around in order to program the bike. Laptop plus 12v battery versus just having the programmer and some aa batteries. Yamaha's setup is better than the others.

  • grayracer513

Posted February 01, 2010 - 10:01 PM

#36

Using a laptop would be fine as long as the updated program can be loaded on a card or USB drive, or to an easily removable module of the system so that the computer doesn't have to be directly connected to the bike (which allows the use of a desktop as well), and assuming the user has a computer (I know, who doesn't, right?), but you would still need software for the computer, and I doubt it would be that much less than $280.

The tuner is an interface device that has very little software of its own at all, if it's like the Tech II used to work GM and other cars other than what it takes to have the ability to re-write the software on the ECU. It's just my opinion, but I think it's a better approach.

  • APlusAutoParts

Posted February 02, 2010 - 03:54 AM

#37

I don't mean to offend anyone but if you are spending 7k or 8k on a bike how can you complain about $235 on e-bay for the tuner. Snap On sells them for cars and they can be from $3,000 to $35,000, i guess we should be glad Snap On isn't making them for Yamaha.

  • Davey762

Posted February 02, 2010 - 05:40 AM

#38

Isn't the use of a laptop a good thing? The tuner costs a lot of $$$ for a single function. They should put the software in the processor and allow you to run it via telnet/console as lots of modern industrial gizmos work.


No, the use of laptops are not a good thing.

1st. Laptop, not everyone has one (I do, but who wants to carry that along to the track and get dirty possibly) It's bigger and more expensive to carry along, cost more to replcae if it hits the dirt at the track as well.

2nd. Cost. The software and cables cost just as much as the GYTR tuner. (in canada I got my GYTR tuner for free with the bike!) The MXA article states the Kawi kit is $515, thats a lot more than $280 for the gytr tuner that is much simpler.

3rd. Time. The honda and kawi systems need plastic removed and a friggen work bench to program them FI systems. Need a laptop, cables, separate 12v battery to charge the system. The yamaha tuner needs two aa batterys and a plastic clip removed by the head tube and you're on your way. The rider with a yamaha could be be programmed and on his bike before the guy on his kawi or honda has his laptop booted up LOL.

Sure, your "telnet/console" method seems great, but its not out yet and yamaha has everyone covered in their way in tuning the bikes in 2010. Hopefully the other brands take note and make a similar tuning system for them bikes soon enough. But if they dont it wont bug me as I'll have the advantage/bragging rights to an easier/simpler system.

Read this MXA article on how to reprogram the crf450, pretty long process. The simplicity of the yamaha system blows it away.
http://www.motocross...A02428A80079478

Kawi as well, even longer.

http://www.motocross...85C3D2A3968939B

  • Mike546

Posted February 02, 2010 - 07:32 AM

#39

I have to agree with Davey762, the Yanaha tool is so quick and easy to use. If your at the track and someone has a different map in their bike that you want to try you can download it from their bike and have in yours in about two minutes. Now, if you could mount it on your helmet and shoot video it would be perfect.

  • ProMed

Posted February 02, 2010 - 02:27 PM

#40

Not when you have to carry an extra battery around in order to program the bike. Laptop plus 12v battery versus just having the programmer and some aa batteries. Yamaha's setup is better than the others.

I wouldn't say it is "better" than the other tuners, it is however more convenient. The Yamaha tuner is the most basic and least sophisticated of any of them, has the least amount of options and allows the fewest adjustments. As has already been mentioned however, the Yamaha tuner is small, portable, and doesn't require a laptop. It is perfect for 90% of riders and with only a few adjustable settings it is likely comparatively easier to not get lost in the programming. I imagine that most casual dirt bike riders are not the most technically advanced group of people.





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