Oil Change Procedure for '06-'09 Model YZ450's


21 replies to this topic
  • grayracer513

Posted November 28, 2009 - 07:23 PM

#1

Those not familiar with the oil change procedure on a YZF frequently get it wrong. This is written as a reference for those who have just acquired an '06-'09 YZ450, but didn't get a manual with it.

If you don't have one already, start by downloading a manual here:

http://www.yamaha-mo...ice/manuals.jsp

Or Here:

http://www.yamahaown...ook.com.au/?r=0

You should also understand that the motorcycle has a dry sump oiling system, wherein the oil is stored in separate area, pumped from there to the lube points, then picked up and returned to the "tank". In the '06-'09 models, the "tank" is a reservoir built into the front of the crankcase assembly just in front of the actual crankshaft cavity. Thus, the dip stick is located on the left side top of the crankcase in front of the cylinder. The engine must have been run within 10 minutes prior to checking the level, or the oil may begin to drain back into the crankcases, and your reading will be inaccurate.

Read also:

http://www.thumperta...903#post5221903

Simplified oil change procedure:

  • Start and run the engine for about one minute and shut down.
  • Remove the dip stick to allow the "tank" to vent.
  • Remove the drain bolt from the left side below the ignition cover. This drains the "tank" section Replace the bolt and the dipstick.
  • Remove the oil filter cover and replace the filter (or clean it if using stainless mesh. do not reuse brass mesh filters) Replace the cover.
  • Remove the drain bolt from the crankcase, located behind the right side frame rail on the bottom rear corner of the transmission, angled straight out toward the frame. Replace when it finishes draining.
  • Refill the system at the fill port on the left crankcase cover. Refill with 1.0 liter if you changed the filter, or 1 quart (0.95L) if you didn't :excuseme:
  • Start the engine, run for at least one minute, shut down and check your oil level.
Torque wrenches should not be necessary if you have a reasonable level of skill and common sense.

You should also read:

http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=575367

and:

http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=634724

  • SM421

Posted November 29, 2009 - 06:33 AM

#2

Gray, when you think about it, redistributing the oil throughout the engine just prior draining it doesn't make much sense. Unless the purpose is to thin the oil because you are in a cold climate at the time. When the bike sits for any period of time all the oil drains to the lowest point. So, without starting it first you are more likely to drain the majority of the oil when you open all the drain points.

I realize the procedure you described is from the Yamaha manual but I never saw the point. Especially with the light viscosity oil that is recommended and the fact the where I live never gets very cold.

Just another point of view.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 29, 2009 - 07:23 AM

#3

Gray, when you think about it, redistributing the oil throughout the engine just prior draining it doesn't make much sense.

Running the engine prior to draining accomplishes several key things:

  • Warm oil drains more thoroughly, regardless of the climate and viscosity
  • Circulating the oil prior to draining puts at least some sediment in suspension so that it is removed with the oil
  • Circulating the oil gives the lube points in the engine a fresh coat, so that on start up after the oil change, when they will briefly have no oil fed to them, they are less likely to become damaged. This is especially important with YZF models from '03 on, because oil is not refilled into the feed reservoir. Rather, it is refilled into the crankcase, and must be pumped from there to the feed reservoir before it can be sent by the feed pump to fill the filter well and resume normal lubrication


  • SM421

Posted November 29, 2009 - 10:11 AM

#4

I think an experiment is necessary to prove the theory that oil redistributed throughout the engine just prior to draining will in fact drain more thoroughly than oil that was hot the last time you ran the motor and then drained into the reservoir over time and is now cold.

I can see your point and perhaps a minor benefit from circulating the oil one last time before draining so as you indicated, it could suspend some sediment just prior to draining.

As for the thought that by warming the motor up before changing the oil you are ensuring a film of oil on the parts for the restart, means that you had to start it cold in the first place and, in doing so you just subjected the motor to a brief no oil scenario. Seems to be a catch 22. Every time you go riding you subject the motor to a cold start scenario and a delay in lubrication so why do it just to change the oil?

Gray, no disrespect intended on this. It just appears to be one of those issues that can’t be settled without an actual test. It’s like the ongoing never ending questionp; "which oil is best?"

  • grayracer513

Posted November 29, 2009 - 12:31 PM

#5

As for the thought that by warming the motor up before changing the oil you are ensuring a film of oil on the parts for the restart, means that you had to start it cold in the first place and, in doing so you just subjected the motor to a brief no oil scenario. Seems to be a catch 22. Every time you go riding you subject the motor to a cold start scenario and a delay in lubrication so why do it just to change the oil?

The difference is in the amount of time the engine goes without oil. In an typical cold start, the filter well is reasonably full, and in the '06+ models, the feed reserve will not drain entirely into the crankcase, as is eventually the case with the older bikes, because the tank is at such a low level. Thus, oil begins to flow from the feed pump immediately, and oil pressure is developed in 4 seconds or less, usually quite a bit less.

By contrast, with the oil just changed, the feed reserve and the filter well are both empty. The engine has to run long enough to initiate oil flow through the return circuit and deliver at least 100cc of oil to the tank before the feed pump can begin to deliver it, and then the filter well must be charged before any significant oil can flow downstream from that point. This can take anywhere from 10-20 seconds, more or less.

  • Vegas426

Posted March 08, 2011 - 02:27 PM

#6

Very interesting and educational debate. Thank you for posting. When in doubt; do. Most selling point to me is a quick full lube down before draining for the restart. We all know you can't drain a true 100% of the oil, so why not give the engine and oil bath? Thanks for the post.

  • Duramax913

Posted April 25, 2011 - 01:39 AM

#7

grayracer,I was looking at downloading the manual for my 08 but it only lists 07-09.. is the 09 the same for 08?

  • grayracer513

Posted April 25, 2011 - 01:50 PM

#8

grayracer,I was looking at downloading the manual for my 08 but it only lists 07-09.. is the 09 the same for 08?


I have no idea what you're talking about:

http://www.yamahaown...S2-28199-82.pdf

  • Duramax913

Posted April 25, 2011 - 11:42 PM

#9

Thats what I was looking for :thumbsup: thank you!

  • bobabooy

Posted April 26, 2011 - 04:50 PM

#10

I have an 2008 yz450f, I did the oil change just as the manual says to, but it says to loosen up an oil pressure bolt (?) that is located to the rear of the cylinder and to start the bike. Oil should start to come out within 60 seconds or it says to shut it down so you dont seize. I have done this in the past and it has worked fine, however, now no oil comes out of this port when I start it now. I have let it run longer than a minute, I have run at rpm faser than idle, but still no oil??? I have the correct amount of oil and everything is installed correctly as far as i can see. I noticed in the above instructions, there is no mention of this oil pressure port or loosening of this bolt to check oil pressure? Whats the story???

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  • grayracer513

Posted April 26, 2011 - 08:00 PM

#11

Unless there is some evidence that the oil pump has quit working, there's nothing you can do during an oil change to prevent the bike from oiling correctly, outside of not putting oil in it in the first place, so I rarely bother with the check bolt.

The only exception would be if your bike has a Ready Racing oil filter cover on it (identifiable by a big "R" on a black cover. Ready decided not to put the safety tab that prevents the reversed installation of the oil filter on their filter cover, so in that case, one could put the filter in backward and shut off the oiling system. The filter belongs with the open end out.

Slightly loosen the oil filter cover as the engine runs. Oil should push out of it. Oil should also leak from around a loosened dip stick on these models. If it does both of these things, it's likely all good, and you just didn't loosen the bolt in the head enough.

  • Octanee

Posted April 28, 2011 - 08:33 PM

#12

i hate changing the oil, i mean its easy, But geeze.... it seems every time i do it, not 100% of the oil comes out, so say like 70% of the oil, last drain i did, i got like 700ML out, out of a probable 900Ml, not that much but when you put back in your 1L, now your at 1.2L, and next oil change, well you may as well say your at 1.4L unless it does get to come out,

but thats what always has irritated me, why could they not of made it a better design for taking that oil out.....

and when you change your oil you check for oil pressure by that 8 MM bolt thats on your engine head near the carb on the left side when sitting on the bike, it s right next to that rubber boot for the carb connecting to the head, loosen that up, start bike, and should see oil start to come out off it, slowly, if not after 1 min you shut off the bike because you got a problem

  • grayracer513

Posted April 29, 2011 - 08:20 AM

#13

.... it seems every time i (change oil), not 100% of the oil comes out, so say like 70% of the oil, last drain i did, i got like 700ML out, out of a probable 900Ml, not that much but when you put back in your 1L, now your at 1.2L, and next oil change, well you may as well say your at 1.4L unless it does get to come out,...

You are doing something wrong, and I would guess that would be either forgetting to loosen the dip stick so the "tank" can drain properly, or leaving the filter in and adding back a full liter instead of a quart. Or, possibly draining only from the tank (left front) and not draining from the crankcase (right rear). One way or other, you should not be having that problem.

  • chappell24

Posted April 29, 2011 - 08:56 AM

#14

Very interesting thread, and one that all owners (i think) should at least scan, manuals always give an 'ideal world' method.
i think in these days a forum with many owners, and opinions is just as... or even more helpful than the manual!!

cheers guys.

  • Yooper

Posted May 27, 2012 - 09:15 AM

#15

Hello TT members.

Regarding: http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=634724

Thanks to Gray and others that have contributed to this topic and alerted me to this potential/eventually problem if not fixed. I have just switched to Blue bike after having been on Orange 2-strokes for a long time (99, 02, 03, 05, 08). So although I have had an account on TT I have been mostly hovering on that Orange site. I do like what I see here on this site and I am liking the value in my Blue YZ450f bike.

I did the fix Gray suggested only I substituted something I had on hand for the ball bearing.

Posted Image

This worked out for me as I have daughters that like to plink cans with their BB guns.

I also like this because .177 or 4.5mm seemed pretty good to me for a pressed fit w/o drilling and I didn't want to drill because I had just done an oil change (shavings) and hadn't started the bike yet when I found this post. So I removed the filter cover & filter, covered the oil pump hole, threaded a greased tap in the lower bolt hole and drove the BB in with a punch and staked as shown below. Just another way to get it done. Of course the stainless steel has its merits but I figured that a copper coated steel ball even if not stainless isn't going to contaminate anything being in an oil bath. The drilled step idea is good too but this isn't going anywhere. More times than not.... me and drilling holes is anything but perfection (oval, not straight.)

Posted Image
Posted Image

Edited by JCCH, May 27, 2012 - 12:27 PM.


  • Mike1963

Posted June 04, 2012 - 06:52 AM

#16

I couldn't find this similar thread for 2005 YZ450, but I'm hoping someone can help. I have been riding and changing the oil for only two seasons, but I've been changing the oil the same way and have only run into a problem once. There is one drain bolt at the bottom of the bike between the frame rails, facing backward. Then, there is the oil filter cover. I replace the filter every time I change the oil. This time, I completed the oil change, ran the engine, turned the engine off, put the YZ back on the stand, and opened the dipstick. The dipstick is up closer to the handlebar on the '05. When I twisted the dipstick, oil spewed out under pressure. It looked like a fountain. At first, I figured I didn't drain enough oil out because (maybe) I didn't removed the dipstick for the initial draining. So, I drained the oil again but now the oil level at the dipstick will not drop down. The dipstick is registering beautiful, clear, golden oil and full... with no oil in the crank case. What did I clog, and how do I fix it? Thanks,
Mike

  • grayracer513

Posted June 04, 2012 - 07:02 AM

#17

I couldn't find this similar thread for 2005 YZ450, but I'm hoping someone can help. I have been riding and changing the oil for only two seasons, but I've been changing the oil the same way and have only run into a problem once. There is one drain bolt at the bottom of the bike between the frame rails, facing backward. Then, there is the oil filter cover. I replace the filter every time I change the oil. This time, I completed the oil change, ran the engine, turned the engine off, put the YZ back on the stand, and opened the dipstick. The dipstick is up closer to the handlebar on the '05. When I twisted the dipstick, oil spewed out under pressure. It looked like a fountain. At first, I figured I didn't drain enough oil out because (maybe) I didn't removed the dipstick for the initial draining. So, I drained the oil again but now the oil level at the dipstick will not drop down. The dipstick is registering beautiful, clear, golden oil and full... with no oil in the crank case. What did I clog, and how do I fix it? Thanks,
Mike


The procedure is right there in the Common Threads Sticky (the one that says "look here first"):
http://www.thumperta...660#post8765660

Your problem arises from the fact that you did not drain the oil tank in the frame, which is where the oil is stored during operation. Read the article at the link, and the linked posts within it.

  • ruleej32

Posted August 29, 2012 - 03:49 PM

#18




Is the 09 yz450 procedure the same as this? (drain bolt locations, screen, etc...)

  • grayracer513

Posted August 29, 2012 - 04:35 PM

#19

Is the 09 yz450 procedure the same as this? (drain bolt locations, screen, etc...)


No, it's not. That's for a 250F that still has external oil lines.

  • coop450f

Posted January 30, 2013 - 09:18 AM

#20

Thanks gray your very knowledgeable





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