Stock chain = POS


26 replies to this topic
  • ww44wrf450f

Posted October 27, 2009 - 08:05 AM

#21

If it only took you 5 rides to stretch that new chain, you're doing goooood. Mine, last year did the same thing. But I know what you mean when you finally notice it (the stretch)? especially being that it's a new bike and all, I had the same kinda reaction!!

  • William1

Posted October 27, 2009 - 09:06 AM

#22

i know its was not too tight.. it was too loose because it stretched....
its a $100 DID Xring chain.. maybe I am just being anal...
Like i said.. i'm not throwing it in the garbage can just yet....
I still can't believe you havent had to adjust your chain william1

as for adjusting it.. i just tried to get the marks on the blocks as close to the same on both sides... maybe i'll look at that a little more


Nope, never had to adjust it once. Same goes for my DRZ 470 (50+ Hp) SM. That bike is now 4 years old with about 7,000 miles on it.

First thing I do when I get a bike is a full prep and adjustment. I determine if the alignment is good, if not, I set it and check the axle blocks. If they are not identical, I make a note of the difference and use that value if I ever have to adjust the chain. With the high quality of modern oring chains, internal wear (the part that makes a chain 'stretch') is not a issue, it is the rollers and sprockets that go and necessitate the replacement. After a severe crash, you should recheck the chain alignment, will tell you if the bike got tweaked.

  • panaman

Posted October 27, 2009 - 09:34 AM

#23

Nope, never had to adjust it once. Same goes for my DRZ 470 (50+ Hp) SM. That bike is now 4 years old with about 7,000 miles on it.

First thing I do when I get a bike is a full prep and adjustment. I determine if the alignment is good, if not, I set it and check the axle blocks. If they are not identical, I make a note of the difference and use that value if I ever have to adjust the chain. With the high quality of modern oring chains, internal wear (the part that makes a chain 'stretch') is not a issue, it is the rollers and sprockets that go and necessitate the replacement. After a severe crash, you should recheck the chain alignment, will tell you if the bike got tweaked.


If I checked the chain after a severe crash I would be checking my chain every 10 minutes! :bonk:

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  • William1

Posted October 27, 2009 - 11:34 AM

#24

Well, at the end of the day, it is a good idea to re-check the alignment.

I never crash anymore. I am too beat up to ride that hard. Little kids on mountain bikes that have training wheels pass me on the uphill parts..................

  • diegox450

Posted October 27, 2009 - 11:40 AM

#25

The stock chain is already a high end DID chain. My stock chain lasted 4000km's of hard singletrack with lot's of mud (hard on chains)
My replacement chain was a Regina ZRH with Ironman sprockets that I've gotten 5000km's out of and is now ready for replacement. My Ironman rear sprocket still shows no wear but I've gone threw 2 countershafts in the 5000km.
Something must be wrong with sprocket alighnment or slack for your chain to go that fast.


MY stock chain lasted 5000 kms and I only changed the counter. Using a DID now, with 4000 kms on it and only one adjustment, and one counter but for gearing reasons (no wear on it).

I use Castrol Chain Wax or Yamalube. Always I clean the chain before lubing it.

  • reloadz400

Posted October 27, 2009 - 12:01 PM

#26

Here i made this for the kids on the gixxer.com who couldn't* seem to understand how to properly adjust a chain/rear axle.
Posted Image

Simply measure till center to center is even on both sides. This method guarantees your axle is aligned with the engine. DO NOT FOLLOW THE MARKINGS ON THE BLOCKS. Even after market blocks with "corrected" markings. They cant take into account the fine differences of each swingarm/frame/ coming out of a jig.

Edited by reloadz400, October 27, 2009 - 12:05 PM.
meant couldn't. Seriously....


  • Diabs

Posted October 28, 2009 - 08:26 AM

#27

You really have to spin the wheel and look down the chain, and you'll see if your off. The rear sprocket will show if its off, and that alone can make your chain tight. This works for me all the time.




 
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