Stock chain = POS


26 replies to this topic
  • panaman

Posted October 25, 2009 - 04:47 AM

#1

After 5 rides on my 09 WR450, my stock chain is stretching like crazy....

anyway.... the wife wants to know what I want for christmas....
so, I think I am putting a new chain on the list....

how many link chain do I order...... prolly go with a DID or something similiar....

  • byggd

Posted October 25, 2009 - 04:56 AM

#2

Look into primary drive. You can spend more but you won't get a better chain.

  • panaman

Posted October 25, 2009 - 05:02 AM

#3

thanks....
i also just figured it out its a 520x114

  • YZEtc

Posted October 25, 2009 - 06:29 AM

#4

You sure you're not running it too tight?
When you sit on the bike and compress the rear suspension, are you left with a little bit of slack, or is the chain as tight as a bow string?

  • panaman

Posted October 25, 2009 - 06:49 AM

#5

You sure you're not running it too tight?
When you sit on the bike and compress the rear suspension, are you left with a little bit of slack, or is the chain as tight as a bow string?


no its not too tight.. i give it the 3 finger rule when adjusting it.....

  • Curios

Posted October 25, 2009 - 06:55 AM

#6

I think sometimes people tend to tighten the chain when it does not need tightening. This will cause it to stretch.

  • tribalbc

Posted October 25, 2009 - 07:53 AM

#7

The stock chain is already a high end DID chain. My stock chain lasted 4000km's of hard singletrack with lot's of mud (hard on chains)
My replacement chain was a Regina ZRH with Ironman sprockets that I've gotten 5000km's out of and is now ready for replacement. My Ironman rear sprocket still shows no wear but I've gone threw 2 countershafts in the 5000km.
Something must be wrong with sprocket alighnment or slack for your chain to go that fast.

  • Mark Grant

Posted October 25, 2009 - 07:57 AM

#8

DID 520v 120 link is a great lower cost O ring chain. You can find them for like $75 or so. I have the DID 520VT2 on my bike, but not everybody wants a $150 chain. I can tell you it has not stretched and it robs very little power. DID is all I sell and all I run on my bikes.

  • redhurricane

Posted October 25, 2009 - 08:25 AM

#9

Something seems odd here. My 2006 is still on it's original chain. Now I'm not a pro racer, but I tear up 2-3 sets of tires per season so I am twisting the throttle a lot. If the chain is adjusted properly, it'll last a long time. If it's LUBED properly it will last even longer. What are you using for lube? I used to use all the chain lube/chain wax products out there, I've reverted back to WD-40. I lube before every trip, and there's no gunk build up like the chain wax products cause.

Even though the chain looks lubed, if the stuff is not getting into the pivot points it's going to heat up and wear quickly.

  • SAthump

Posted October 25, 2009 - 08:28 AM

#10

[COLOR=Blue]I would go with the manuals directions and a tape measure method, the stock chain is top of the line and will last a very long time.[/COLOR]

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  • panaman

Posted October 25, 2009 - 08:56 AM

#11

You guys are correct.. it is a good chain....
DID 520VM-114 X-Ring chain.....
I wonder why mine seemed to stretch so much.. i'll keep monitoring it.... it just seemed odd to me....

I use motul off-road chain lube
Posted Image

  • WR450FGreg

Posted October 25, 2009 - 10:22 AM

#12

.

Something seems odd here. My 2006 is still on it's original chain.


I've done about 2500km on my '08 with the original chain fitted and it has barely stretched at all. I've never seen a chain like it in 37 years of riding!
I'm average weight, 75kg, ride fairly hard (former racer).

Could it possibly be an alignment issue?
They say you need to count the marks from the back of the swingarm, not the front, when checking alignment.
The marks are apparently uneven in number. (I've never bothered to actually check this, so it might not be true, not 100% sure.)

My chain maintenance procedure is probably the most anal anyone has ever heard .......

1. Get home from any ride
2. Raise bike on stand
3. Wire brush all 4 sides of the chain in two directions (takes full 5 minutes)
4. Start bike and let idle in gear
5. Blow chain with compressed air
6. Spray chain with WD40, switch off
7. Wash bike
8. Start bike again, idle in gear
9. Blow with compressed air again
10. Spray with chain lube

On top of this I always carry a small can of chain lube to give it a lube halfway through our day rides too.

Greg

  • ww44wrf450f

Posted October 25, 2009 - 12:03 PM

#13

You need to get a straight edge and or a good eye and line it up by sighting down the top and side of the chain as your free wheeling it(spinning the tire), from the back sprocket to the front sprocket -- the numbers on the axle blocks are for a starting point only! and are not accurate, also check the sprocket sides and top itself for wear and see what side has a shinier side to it and make very minor adjustments from knowing that! Push down on the chain from the bottom loop and see if the top loop torques to one side and straighten itself out as you put pressure on the lower loop. When you go to snug the axle nut up, apply pressure to the chain - this will keep the axle snug and tight against the adjusting blocks -- recheck the alignment of the chain to see if the chain is aliened and make minor adjustments before you torque the axle nut up to it's final spec and recheck again.Remember everything moves as you tighten the axle nut up and can be a pita. Switch bikes with someone and watching what that chain is doing at 70mph on a dirt road and under acceleration, is helpful too. Most people find that they like the higher end of the slack spec's. If you took some tie downs(swing-arm to sub-frame) and aligned the swing arm straight, that chain would have a .5 inch up and down or a total of 1 " slack or more-- so I've read! Chains can get messed up, ever so often, by stick and stones that get caught in them and can make the chain bind at a link and wear sooner along with the sprockets.

IMO, allot of people damage their O ring chain while over cleaning it, I try not to get to close with the pressure washer and I use a basting brush with 30 wt. oil on it after and before every ride, only. I never take a brush to an 0-ring chain or compressed air, the grease is meant to stay inside the rollers and over cleaning can wash away that escaping grease and damage the o-rings, IMO, if you like a shinny chain don't use an 0-ring chain:banghead:. I'n saying this, that chain will have a life span of what grease last inside the chain, it's stretch and the roller's alignment in relationship to the sprockets under torque! . I try to keep the chain from rusting, and keep the sprockets clean(oil dirt buildup) so the dirt can escape the chain while riding! :bonk: But mainly my cleaning is 30wt oil on a basting brush and a rag on the outside pins to wipe away stuck dirt on the outsides.

Edited by ww44wrf450f, October 25, 2009 - 02:22 PM.


  • Strattos

Posted October 25, 2009 - 03:05 PM

#14

I've got more than 5000ks on my 08WR450 with standard chain. It has stretched a bit since new, but nothing outrageous. Still well within spec and going strong. I ride mainly in sandy conditions and use WD40 after washing each time. Works for me. In terms of alignment, I get the adjuster notches as close to identical as possible and then give the wheel a few spins and have a look down the chain.

  • erickdj

Posted October 25, 2009 - 08:39 PM

#15

something must be wrong there, or you got a defective one. My 07 has about 3k miles and still looks great and hardly any stretching. But, if it does need to be replaced, look at the Regina ORS6, pretty good quality chain.

  • YamaLink

Posted October 25, 2009 - 09:16 PM

#16

My friends and I were very hesitant when I put a Primary Drive on one of the WRF; I put another very popular and reliable chain on the other bike at the same time for a friend.

Many months later of use and abuse the Primary Drive is holding up and not giving anything to the more expensive brand. We weigh the same, ride in the same areas, crash our brains out equally.... Even my skeptical friends who were with me the day I installed the PD admitted they were suprised I have not been left stranded due to breakage or spending more money when the chain was supposed to wear out twice as fast.

I highly recommend it, too.

Look into primary drive. You can spend more but you won't get a better chain.



  • WR450FGreg

Posted October 27, 2009 - 02:24 AM

#17

.

You need to get a straight edge and or a good eye and line it up by sighting down the top and side of the chain as your free wheeling it(spinning the tire), from the back sprocket to the front sprocket


Yes, or do it really thoroughly and measure the distance from swingarm pivot centre to axle centre with a tape measure like many roadracers do!

I try not to get to close with the pressure washer

Yep, I agree with that too. Never washed my bike with a pressure washer yet. Spells disaster for many bearings.
In fact I never wash my chain directly at all. I spray WD40 on the chain merely to help keep the water I wash my bike with from affecting it.

Forgot to add one thing to my "anal list"...
3.5 Clean all dirt/grease from both sides of rear sprocket with wire brush. (My countershaft sprocket seems to remain clean all the time for some reason, never have to worry about it.)

IMHO a wire brush is not going to harm chain o-rings at all. Been doing it for many, many years and haven't had a damaged o-ring yet.

I guess we all do what we think works and avoid what we think doesn't. :bonk:

Greg :bonk:

  • William1

Posted October 27, 2009 - 05:45 AM

#18

As a chime in, my chain has never been adjusted since I bought my bike about two years ago. I ride it 5 out of seven days a week in very dusty conditions. I second (or is it third/fourth) that either yours is too tight or out of alignment.

  • panaman

Posted October 27, 2009 - 06:52 AM

#19

i know its was not too tight.. it was too loose because it stretched....
its a $100 DID Xring chain.. maybe I am just being anal...
Like i said.. i'm not throwing it in the garbage can just yet....
I still can't believe you havent had to adjust your chain william1

as for adjusting it.. i just tried to get the marks on the blocks as close to the same on both sides... maybe i'll look at that a little more

  • tribalbc

Posted October 27, 2009 - 07:12 AM

#20

i know its was not too tight.. it was too loose because it stretched....
its a $100 DID Xring chain.. maybe I am just being anal...
Like i said.. i'm not throwing it in the garbage can just yet....
I still can't believe you havent had to adjust your chain william1

as for adjusting it.. i just tried to get the marks on the blocks as close to the same on both sides... maybe i'll look at that a little more



You know that the axle block lines don't line up from both directions ?????
You have to measure from one side, can't remember which as I put some aftermarket ones on long ago.
But if you get this wrong your chain will be out of alignment.




 
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