Test Ride: 2010 YZ450


28 replies to this topic
  • Sheriff245

Posted October 19, 2009 - 09:00 AM

#1

I wrote mine for a Canadian website. I had it only for a week, and the weather wasn't good, so we didn't ride it as much as we'd have wanted. We compared it to a few other bikes and tried to get a general idea. Here's a link for those who can read French or want to see a few pictures:
http://www.motocross...a-yz450f551.php

And for the others, a little recap:

Chassis/handling:
the new disposition of engine, intake, exhaust, gas tank and rear shock is very noticeable over the 09 model. You get the impression that the bike is much shorter. It's easier to lay over and to maneuver in the air. The rear wheel gyro effect (panic rev, brake tap) is more noticeable.

Suspension:
rear-end traction is incredible. It's very smooth and stable. I've never experienced a stock suspension that was as good. The front end was pretty good but the stock tire (D742FA) is not very good. The bike is very responsive to sag and fork height. The setting we liked the most after riding the bike for 3 days is written in the link I gave earlier.

Ergos:
Riding position feels very natural. The seat is flat so it's easy to move around. The bars are a little low for taller riders, but the bend is excellent. The rads are a little bit too wide.

Engine:
easy cold-starting. A little too much throttle response (yes, now there is such a thing as a 4 stroke that's too responsive) and lots of power everywhere, even at high rev, where EFI bikes usually struggle. I strongly suggest a GYT-R Power Tuner to shape the powerband in any way you like it. Shifting is top notch and the clutch is easy to pull. Exhaust note reminds me of a factory bike. The air filter stayed pretty clean, though there was no dust. It takes a little bit more time to access (and requires 2 wrench sizes instead of one), but it's not more difficult.

Fit and finish:
excellent, typical Yamaha workmanship. Dirt is prone to get stuck in the area beneath the seat and around the exhaust. The 2-piece side panels are easy to break. Long-term durability is still to prove since it's a totally new model, but I don't see anything major coming out.

Overall, it's a great bike. Not so much better that I'd recommend to sell a bike you planned to keep for another year, but better enough to think that if you're in the market for a new 450, you'd be stupid not to at least visit a Yamaha dealer and check it out.

If you have questions, feel free to ask.

  • rickallen124

Posted October 19, 2009 - 09:09 AM

#2

Did you actually use the gyt-r tuner? If so, how much could you actually alter the power delivery?

  • DPW

Posted October 19, 2009 - 09:28 AM

#3

Here's a link for those who can read French or want to see a few pictures:
http://www.motocross...a-yz450f551.php


this worked pretty good>>http://babelfish.yahoo.com/

  • Sheriff245

Posted October 19, 2009 - 09:47 AM

#4

Did you actually use the gyt-r tuner? If so, how much could you actually alter the power delivery?

I did not play with it myself, but the first time I rode the bike, a Yamaha technician changed the map for me.

The tuner can alter injection duration (richness) and ignition timing at various throttle settings. By advancing or retarding the ignition, you can alter the hit. So you can have, for example, an engine that's very soft off the bottom, then hits hard in the middle and pulls far to make it feel 2-stroke-ish. Fine tuning the injection will also affect the performance of the engine. For example, the 08 RM-Z 450 is too rich at high RPMs, making the powerband fatten up top. By leaning it a little, you get more top end power.

The stock map is aggressive. The first day, Jean Sebastien Roy was out testing the bike with us and even he had the technician soften the hit. For each throttle setting, you have 19 different possibilities (stock is 0, and it ranges from -9 to +9).

  • YamaLink

Posted October 19, 2009 - 11:08 AM

#5

Now that's more like it!
I didn't go to your site link so forgive me if this was covered, but did you own/race an 09 yz450f? Mainly a mx racer? Off-road? If so, was the suspension stock or modded?

What is your weight with gear?

Again, thanks for the input.

Anyway, I wrote mine for a Canadian website. I had it only for a week, and the weather wasn't good, so we didn't ride it as much as we'd have wanted. We compared it to a few other bikes and tried to get a general idea. Here's a link for those who can read French or want to see a few pictures:
http://www.motocross...a-yz450f551.php

And for the others, a little recap:

Chassis/handling:
the new disposition of engine, intake, exhaust, gas tank and rear shock is very noticeable over the 09 model. You get the impression that the bike is much shorter. It's easier to lay over and to maneuver in the air. The rear wheel gyro effect (panic rev, brake tap) is more noticeable.

Suspension:
rear-end traction is incredible. It's very smooth and stable. I've never experienced a stock suspension that was as good. The front end was pretty good but the stock tire (D742FA) is not very good. The bike is very responsive to sag and fork height. The setting we liked the most after riding the bike for 3 days is written in the link I gave earlier.

Ergos:
Riding position feels very natural. The seat is flat so it's easy to move around. The bars are a little low for taller riders, but the bend is excellent. The rads are a little bit too wide.

Engine:
easy cold-starting. A little too much throttle response (yes, now there is such a thing as a 4 stroke that's too responsive) and lots of power everywhere, even at high rev, where EFI bikes usually struggle. I strongly suggest a GYT-R Power Tuner to shape the powerband in any way you like it. Shifting is top notch and the clutch is easy to pull. Exhaust note reminds me of a factory bike. The air filter stayed pretty clean, though there was no dust. It takes a little bit more time to access (and requires 2 wrench sizes instead of one), but it's not more difficult.

Fit and finish:
excellent, typical Yamaha workmanship. Dirt is prone to get stuck in the area beneath the seat and around the exhaust. The 2-piece side panels are easy to break. Long-term durability is still to prove since it's a totally new model, but I don't see anything major coming out.

Overall, it's a great bike. Not so much better that I'd recommend to sell a bike you planned to keep for another year, but better enough to think that if you're in the market for a new 450, you'd be stupid not to at least visit a Yamaha dealer and check it out.

If you have questions, feel free to ask.



  • Sheriff245

Posted October 19, 2009 - 01:51 PM

#6

Now that's more like it!
I didn't go to your site link so forgive me if this was covered, but did you own/race an 09 yz450f? Mainly a mx racer? Off-road? If so, was the suspension stock or modded?

What is your weight with gear?

Again, thanks for the input.


I did ride the 2010 back to back with a brand new, stock 09. It was on an SX track though (first time on a real man's SX track). My own bikes are an 08.5 RM-Z450 (all stock except for taller bars and longer shift lever) and an 05 YZ125 (lots of mods). I race MX and a local SX/AX-type series.

We were 2 riders testing the bike. I'm 160lbs w/o gear and race in the expert class (more like mid-pack B in the US probably). My partner is a C level rider, and weighs around 175-180lbs w/o gear. If you look at my link, you'll see our suspension settings. The sag we put there is an average of my reading vs. his.

  • IMCanadian

Posted October 19, 2009 - 01:54 PM

#7

Here is the link translated. Babel Fish is not perfect but close enough.

http://babelfish.yah...TrUrl=Translate

  • JJetmar

Posted October 19, 2009 - 03:50 PM

#8

wow thanks for the test, As much as I wanted it to be worlds better than any bike ever made, it does not sound extraordinary. How does it handle compaired to your 8.5 RMZ 450???? thanks

  • Sheriff245

Posted October 19, 2009 - 05:26 PM

#9

The handling is great. IMO the RM-Z had the best handling in 2009, and I spent a lot of time finetuning the suspension on mine, but at the end of the week end I started to feel right at home on the Yammie. This bike has a lot of potential. And it feels a bit lighter on the track. It just needs a good front tire.

  • charley586

Posted October 19, 2009 - 06:10 PM

#10

I'm the other rider who tested the YZ450F with Sheriff245.

Btw I'm more 170-175 than 175-180 J/K

I also own a 08.5 RMZ450. I prefer the power of the YZ450F (the one smoothed but in the sand it didn't bothered me at all). But on hard pack I would definetely use another map.

Few points I'm not too sure about the new YZ450F. First the gas thanks it's 1 liter smaller. In 2008 Jean-Sebastien Roy and Blair Morgan but ran out of fuel on the sandiest track of the canadian championship. Kind of like Southwick. Sheriff also ran out of fuel in a rythmn section... The other things is the empty hole where was the air filter previously. It's like a mud trap. I would have close the hole so no mud will stuck there. Last question mark, the junction between the front and back shroud... I never got stuck in it but it will happen at some point. Oh yeah I'm not too sure how the rear shock will react when the bike will get hot with the exhaust all around the rear shock, it can make it run hot so the rear won't react the same (knew problem on the Cannondale).

good point
Like sheriff said, the rear is totally planted to the ground. Even tough I never like the dunlop tire. With this bike it was really really nice. It make you want to sit more on the bike to see how much time you can sit on it before it's getting too rough. The ergo of the bike. I felt at home right at the beginning excep that the bike is pretty wide at the front and slim between the legs. The sound.... it's like the 9th symphony!!! The power, since I'm a sand rider and always need some (wich my RMZ totally lack on top). The white version of the bike is simply one the best best looking bike ever made (in my opinion).

We tested on hard pack, sand track with some muddy section and a real SX track. Yes it's a really good bike and I can feel the difference with the mass centralisation but do I like it more than my RMZ... For now No but having the chance to have it for a month and play more with the suspension and use my trusty Michelin MS3 and I can change my mind.

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  • grayracer513

Posted October 19, 2009 - 07:35 PM

#11

...I'm not too sure how the rear shock will react when the bike will get hot with the exhaust all around the rear shock, it can make it run hot so the rear won't react the same (knew problem on the Cannondale).

Let me predict right here that the shock will absorb less heat from the exhaust than the '09 does. If it was going to be a problem, it would have been found and dealt with during the three years the bike has been tested.

  • KAS

Posted October 19, 2009 - 10:07 PM

#12

Let me predict right here that the shock will absorb less heat from the exhaust than the '09 does. If it was going to be a problem, it would have been found and dealt with during the three years the bike has been tested.


For that matter, has anybody cared to take a look at the pre-2010 YZ's (or any other 4-stroke) exhaust/shock reservoir? They're so close they almost touch!

So worrying about the 2010 set up seems a little silly.

  • charley586

Posted October 20, 2009 - 03:37 AM

#13

For that matter, has anybody cared to take a look at the pre-2010 YZ's (or any other 4-stroke) exhaust/shock reservoir? They're so close they almost touch!

So worrying about the 2010 set up seems a little silly.


The PRE-2010 exhaust was cool-downed (sorry my english is bad sometime) by the fact that the exhaust was going in the front of the bike. Also the rear shock was not as close to the exhaust as the 2010 wich it's few inch away and the header goes around the body of the rear shock. This make the ''contact surface'' between the shock much greater thant the pre-2010 wich just pass by. Thats a rule in thermodynamic, the greater the surface is, greater is the heat exchange (just think of bigger radiators). Other things, the Yamaha technicians were puttinig heat shield protector inside the side panel and inside the previous airbox. Will it come with the heat shield on the production bike(it was a pre-prod)? I don't know.

  • grayracer513

Posted October 20, 2009 - 06:49 AM

#14

The PRE-2010 exhaust was cool-downed (sorry my english is bad sometime) by the fact that the exhaust was going in the front of the bike. Also the rear shock was not as close to the exhaust as the 2010 wich it's few inch away and the header goes around the body of the rear shock. This make the ''contact surface'' between the shock much greater thant the pre-2010 wich just pass by. Thats a rule in thermodynamic, the greater the surface is, greater is the heat exchange (just think of bigger radiators). Other things, the Yamaha technicians were puttinig heat shield protector inside the side panel and inside the previous airbox. Will it come with the heat shield on the production bike(it was a pre-prod)? I don't know.

Better have another look. The pipe on the '10 does not "go around" the body of the shock. It passes by the spring (which stands well off of the body), separated by a good half an inch. The loop in the pipe is more than two inches behind the shock at its closest point. Furthermore, the shock is far more exposed to air flow than in past models, and with that, the heat from the loop is blown back, away from the shock. Even a 5 mph air flow will effectively spoil any radiant heat transfer over that distance. Combine that with the horizontally mounted gas reservoir, which moves it 4" or more away from the near contact it once had, and the shock is practically insulated from the exhaust heat.

  • daniel605

Posted October 20, 2009 - 07:13 AM

#15

Hey im a woods rider. I do a lot of hill climbing. Some smooth gaslines some rough long steep rutted ones. Every yamaha ive ever ridden in the woods was very bad about stalling. Did you try to see if the bike was bad about stallin at low rpms when you crack the throttle.

  • Sheriff245

Posted October 20, 2009 - 08:31 AM

#16

I'm good at stalling 4 strokes too! It never happened with the 2010. Raising the idle speed on my RM-Z helped a lot also.

  • grayracer513

Posted October 20, 2009 - 09:51 AM

#17

With carbureted engines, the fuel mixture is often partly to blame for that problem, and a lot of that is that people will fatten the pilot circuit up to a ridiculous level in an attempt to make the engine respond to having the throttle snapped open, when that in itself is unnecessary, and the pilot circuit is not the correct way to cure the "problem". Rich mixtures at idle tend to cause the idle speed to dip too rapidly and too far as the engine returns to idle. Leaner mixtures do the opposite.

With EFI, the problem should basically not exist, as long as it is properly programmed.

  • grayracer513

Posted October 21, 2009 - 02:37 PM

#18

There, the thread's been "pruned".

  • daniel605

Posted October 24, 2009 - 06:15 AM

#19

I'm good at stalling 4 strokes too! It never happened with the 2010. Raising the idle speed on my RM-Z helped a lot also.

sheriff245 next time your on the bike could you do me the favor of trying to stall it lol as crazy as it seems. I had a 2009 kx450. I loved that bike. You couldnt make that thing stall. But some selfish inconsiderate ********* stole it outta my basement. Had you ever ridden one of those bikes and if so how does it compare to the yz. Thank you:thumbsup:

  • Sheriff245

Posted October 24, 2009 - 07:57 AM

#20

sheriff245 next time your on the bike could you do me the favor of trying to stall it lol as crazy as it seems. I had a 2009 kx450. I loved that bike. You couldnt make that thing stall. But some selfish inconsiderate ********* stole it outta my basement. Had you ever ridden one of those bikes and if so how does it compare to the yz. Thank you:thumbsup:

I had to give it back to Yamaha unfortunately, so I won't be riding another one until next year unless I decide to buy one.

I did compare it to an 09 earlier: it feels lighter, shorter, snappier, and the suspension seems better.





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