Engine gets tight


35 replies to this topic
  • minidad

Posted January 14, 2010 - 11:11 AM

#21

Gray one more thing I greatly appreciate all of the advice you give all of us. I always do a lot of reading and research before I do most things to our bikes and cars and your advice on the Yamahas is most use full.

  • grayracer513

Posted January 14, 2010 - 11:43 AM

#22

Gray you would be surprised at what pro team uses shell oil, ....

I doubt that. It might surprise me to see them use the same oil for two hours, though. UOA's of Rotella with 2 or more hours on it have invariably come back showing that the oil has dropped below its rated grade, and a 5w-25 or 30 just doesn't work for me. From almost every standpoint, Rotella in either flavor is a very good, high quality engine lubricant. But it's not blended for use in a transmission, and the viscosity index improver additive package won't hold up to the shear forces that occur in a gear box. Lots of people use it, and lots of people get good results.

The truth is that a thirty weight oil is actually adequate in a temperate environment, but adequate isn't what I want. My advice to those using Rotella in their YZF is, "buy it cheap, change it often".

The sealant that you said to use does it come in a pressurized can but come out in a bead instead of spread like paint??

YamaBond comes in a tube last I used it, and squeezes out a lot like RTV or a paste.

The Permatex sealer comes in a half or full length caulking gun type cartridge, and looks a lot like black RTV. It is very different, however. A bit pricey, at $14 for the half tube.

  • Justin Pearson

Posted January 23, 2010 - 11:03 PM

#23

If you havnt put it back together yet, did you replace the crank seal in the right case cover near the check valve? I need to double check which direction that crank seal faces (red side in or out). I figure since you are putting a new crank in that you are putting a new crank seal in. Hopefully you paid better attention then I did when removing it (if you did) cause its not mentioned in the Service Manual! (unbelievably)

  • grayracer513

Posted January 24, 2010 - 08:36 AM

#24

If you havnt put it back together yet, did you replace the crank seal in the right case cover near the check valve? I need to double check which direction that crank seal faces (red side in or out). I figure since you are putting a new crank in that you are putting a new crank seal in. Hopefully you paid better attention then I did when removing it (if you did) cause its not mentioned in the Service Manual! (unbelievably)


http://www.thumperta...989#post9090989

  • minidad

Posted January 24, 2010 - 02:23 PM

#25

If you havnt put it back together yet, did you replace the crank seal in the right case cover near the check valve? I need to double check which direction that crank seal faces (red side in or out). I figure since you are putting a new crank in that you are putting a new crank seal in. Hopefully you paid better attention then I did when removing it (if you did) cause its not mentioned in the Service Manual! (unbelievably)


Red side out away from crankshaft.

  • Justin Pearson

Posted January 24, 2010 - 03:30 PM

#26

Red side out away from crankshaft.


You mean red side facing away from the washer and snap ring right?

  • minidad

Posted January 24, 2010 - 05:00 PM

#27

You mean red side facing away from the washer and snap ring right?


Yes..

  • Diode663

Posted January 28, 2010 - 08:25 AM

#28

Another tip for installing bearings that I use almost exclusively is going to your local welding supply store and picking up a thermos bottle or small cooler of liquid nitrogen. It shouldnt be more then 20 bucks and you dont have to worry about heating up the cases, you just cool the bearings in the nitrogen til it stops boiling and then they are ready to be installed without a hitch.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Justin Pearson

Posted January 28, 2010 - 09:15 AM

#29

So how may bearings have you shattered by accident? :ride:

  • grayracer513

Posted January 28, 2010 - 09:32 AM

#30

So how may bearings have you shattered by accident? :ride:

The really important thing to watch out for would be frostbite. Liquid nitrogen could easily do as much damage to your hands as a welding torch, and more quickly.

  • Justin Pearson

Posted January 28, 2010 - 10:15 AM

#31

Liquid nitrogen could easily do as much damage to your hands as a welding torch, and more quickly.


Could you imagine if you got in a car accident with that stuff in your cab? :ride:

Posted Image

Edited by Justin Pearson, January 29, 2010 - 08:50 AM.


  • rickallen124

Posted January 29, 2010 - 07:01 AM

#32

Greyracer, what is the average life of the crank and bottom end bearings in your experience? I'm guessing that this bike had between 160-200hrs when the bearing went, if it's ridden as often as the op stated.

  • Justin Pearson

Posted January 29, 2010 - 08:57 AM

#33

I sure hope it has more then that on it! My bike is easily over 1000+ hours and still going strong! In fact I have 72 hours on it since the top end i did a few months ago; my chain cut my case the other day so I split the cases and the crank still meaures perfect.

  • grayracer513

Posted January 29, 2010 - 10:57 AM

#34

It really depends a lot on how it's ridden and maintained. The '03 that I had had well over 350 on it, and had never had any major work done. But I've seen big ends fail at less time than that.

My son's '06 crank looked fine when I re-rung it in the course of a head gasket job last year. It probably had around 150-200 on it at the time.

If it is or was a race bike that is mostly raced and practiced on fairly hard every week, I'd go with a crank every season. If you ride recreationally, and the bike's always been used like that, you could go much longer.

  • Justin Pearson

Posted January 29, 2010 - 11:17 AM

#35

My bike gets flogged all the time. I mostly Sand Dune, which is about the toughest thing you can do to a machine besides desert race.

Plus I like to ride looong wheelies, often up, accross and then down dunes so the rpms get kind of high on the down slope, and the bike spends lots of time near 12 oclock. I often wonder how long the oil supply in the tank lasts in these circumstances! :lol:

I change my oil every few hours or so and use high quality oil. I replaced a few trans bearings since they got a little hotter then I felt safe (when we tigged the case) and water pump seals, but other than the detent arm update, NOTHING else in the whole engine needed replacing. I am absolutely amazed how durable these Yami's are, even if the trans design (shift forks) is crap! :ride:

http://i112.photobuc...05/DSC02331.jpg

  • minidad

Posted March 15, 2010 - 04:31 PM

#36

Update,
Got it running after some minor problems (valve shim not in bucket all the way) and it runs good. After break in built bike into a desert racer, big tank, etc. (we mostly do mx) and geared it for about 95mph, this past weekend went and raced the San Felipe 250 and got third in class. Not to bad for a 2006.
Later





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