Nerves....


2 replies to this topic
  • Tcfairlane

Posted August 21, 2009 - 05:01 AM

#1

Okay so i just had to do front wheel bearings and front break pads and also the water pump seal on my bike... First off i think its just cause of the extra pad but now my front wheel does not spin very freely it will turn about 5 times then stop... Not really worried about this but figured i would mention it in case anyone had any input that i should check in case there is something more to it then i know about... Anyways to do the water pump i had to take the crank case cover off and all that stuff and it was the first time i have ever done any of this... Now that i got it back together i keep thinking something is going to go wrong cause i might have done something wrong... Did any one else get this kinda of feeling the first few times they ever worked on there bikes? I really enjoy learning to do it my self but it is bugging the lving hell out of me Lol...

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  • grayracer513

Posted August 21, 2009 - 09:34 AM

#2

Old school drum brakes take relatively little pressure on the shoe to cause significant friction with the drum, and if made correctly, the rotation of the drum will actually make the shoe "bite" harder, so they have to have return springs in order to pull the shoes away from the drum and keep them there.

Disc brakes are the opposite in almost every respect. They take a huge amount of pressure to create any effective pressure, and this causes several things to be true.

First, the leverage required to create the needed pressure is extremely high, which means that you don't get a great deal of travel at the pad by moving the lever through a full stroke. That means that if the pads have a lot of clearance, you might have to pull the lever all the way to the bar to stop the bike, and that wouldn't work out well.

Fortunately, because disc brakes need so much pressure, and because they don't self energize at all the way drum brakes can, they don't need return springs. The pad simply looses pressure when you release the lever, and it sits right against the disc without causing enough drag to matter.

In your case, though, you have brand new pads in place, and the contact surfaces of these are not yet a true match to the surface of the brake rotor. Thus, when you squeeze the lever, the pads move very slightly more than they will after they wear in, because the high spots compress a bit until the low spots come into contact. When the lever is released, the highest of the high spots still touch the rotor with enough force to be noticeable when you spin the wheel. This is normal, and will go away after the pads break in unless the disc is bent.

As far as your water pump job, you don't have to engineer the bike in order for it to work right. That's already been done. You simply have to put all the right parts in the correct places, and make sure it's all tightened down correctly. If you did that, you have nothing to worry about.

  • Tcfairlane

Posted August 21, 2009 - 10:01 AM

#3

Old school drum brakes take relatively little pressure on the shoe to cause significant friction with the drum, and if made correctly, the rotation of the drum will actually make the shoe "bite" harder, so they have to have return springs in order to pull the shoes away from the drum and keep them there.

Disc brakes are the opposite in almost every respect. They take a huge amount of pressure to create any effective pressure, and this causes several things to be true.

First, the leverage required to create the needed pressure is extremely high, which means that you don't get a great deal of travel at the pad by moving the lever through a full stroke. That means that if the pads have a lot of clearance, you might have to pull the lever all the way to the bar to stop the bike, and that wouldn't work out well.

Fortunately, because disc brakes need so much pressure, and because they don't self energize at all the way drum brakes can, they don't need return springs. The pad simply looses pressure when you release the lever, and it sits right against the disc without causing enough drag to matter.

In your case, though, you have brand new pads in place, and the contact surfaces of these are not yet a true match to the surface of the brake rotor. Thus, when you squeeze the lever, the pads move very slightly more than they will after they wear in, because the high spots compress a bit until the low spots come into contact. When the lever is released, the highest of the high spots still touch the rotor with enough force to be noticeable when you spin the wheel. This is normal, and will go away after the pads break in unless the disc is bent.

As far as your water pump job, you don't have to engineer the bike in order for it to work right. That's already been done. You simply have to put all the right parts in the correct places, and make sure it's all tightened down correctly. If you did that, you have nothing to worry about.


Thanks man :thumbsup: I know a need a new brake rotor its a tad warped but nothing bad and i am a tad short on cash so not replacing it yet i figured it would drag a little just cause of the extra pad Thats for explaing it all for me though! And yeah it seemed simple i guess i am just being a worry wart.. :worthy:





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