Towing with a half ton F150


41 replies to this topic
  • Orchard404

Posted July 24, 2009 - 06:17 AM

#1

I've looked myself, but am still wondering how much weight my half ton F150 could tow? It is a 2007 Supercrew Cab 2wd with the 5.4L V8. I am trying to understand what all the numbers and letters I've come across actually mean and how much my truck can tow, and tow safely. And what would the max length be to tow safely? I've heard 25-28ft. or less for a toy hauler?

  • Smacaroni

Posted July 24, 2009 - 06:32 AM

#2

Towing a toy hauler with a half-ton pick-up may produce the following side effects: headache, vomiting, loose bowels or death.
I wouldn't do it.
As to how much weight you can safely tow? What's your hitch size and rating?

  • mx730md

Posted July 24, 2009 - 06:39 AM

#3

Towing a toy hauler with a half-ton pick-up may produce the following side effects: headache, vomiting, loose bowels or death.
I wouldn't do it.
As to how much weight you can safely tow? What's your hitch size and rating?


he is in Florida should be that bad.now if he was up here in pa with some of the long uphills i would agree. i would say get a electronic brake controller and around 8,000 just dont drive like a dick and keep it below 65mph

  • Smacaroni

Posted July 24, 2009 - 06:42 AM

#4

Assuming he stays in the pancake part of FL, yeah. Take that bad boy to Denver and well, I'd rather not be in the same zip code.
And he's 17. Not that another 10 years of driving experience would make a F150 towing a toy-hauler safe, but that's another significant factor.

  • llamaface

Posted July 24, 2009 - 06:51 AM

#5

If your truck has an owners manual, look in it and see what the tow rating is. duh.

In general toyhaulers have very high hitch weights (so that when you load 2 quads in them, they won't get too light up front, I guess), so a 25' or bigger toyhauler will probably be too much for most half-ton trucks without suspension assistance. It's too much for my 2003 tundra, that's for sure.

the smaller toyhaulers should be fine, and you *might* be able to make a 25 footer work, but pay close attention to the hitch weight, and the hitch rating on your truck. I personally went with a normal travel trailer and I toss the bikes in the back of the truck.

  • JJRace

Posted July 24, 2009 - 07:44 AM

#6

The weight is not the problem. It is the wind resistance and lack of power in the F150 motors.

I would not pull over a 18-20 foot unit, under 6k. You will get about 6mpg and be hating life. You need a more powerful truck. The dodge with the Hemi will tow good or the 6L Chevy with the lower 3.92 or 4.10 gears. You will get 8mpg in either towing, but that is life. Only about 3-4 more if you get a diesel.

Been there, sold that Ford. Same with a few friends had the same issues with their F150s and sold them.

  • ForsheeMS

Posted July 24, 2009 - 07:48 AM

#7

I pull a 7' X 18' enclosed trailer with my '06 Tundra. The manual says 7,500lbs towing capacity. My trailer loaded with bikes, gear, tools and everything is about 5,000lbs. I have no problems running the speed limit anywhere we go but I feel that much more weight would be more than the truck can safely handle. Not to mention excess wear and tear. My dad has an 06 F150 with the 5.4 and in my opinion pulls very similar to my Tundra.

  • xr400dad

Posted July 24, 2009 - 07:55 AM

#8

When I saw how little my F150 would tow I went out and got an F250 Diesel. The 4.6 and 5.4 both suck for towing a TH IMO.

  • Smacaroni

Posted July 24, 2009 - 08:01 AM

#9

The weight is not the problem. It is the wind resistance and lack of power in the F150 motors.

Let's not forget brakes.
Stopping is more important that being able to go.
Most vehicles will tow well beyond what they're rated for, however, trying to slow that mass down is a different story.
Not to mention cross-winds.

  • llamaface

Posted July 24, 2009 - 08:03 AM

#10

The weight is not the problem. It is the wind resistance and lack of power in the F150 motors.

I would not pull over a 18-20 foot unit, under 6k. You will get about 6mpg and be hating life. You need a more powerful truck. The dodge with the Hemi will tow good or the 6L Chevy with the lower 3.92 or 4.10 gears. You will get 8mpg in either towing, but that is life. Only about 3-4 more if you get a diesel.

Been there, sold that Ford. Same with a few friends had the same issues with their F150s and sold them.


Are the ford motors really that bad? I have 4.7L v8 in my tundra, and it pulled a 27' travel trailer (about 6000 lbs) all over the US for a couple years. Now it pulls a 22' trailer (about 5000 lbs) + 3 dirtbikes all over creation. I get 10mpg unless I'm trying to go 70mph into a headwind. Worst I've ever gotten for 1 tank is 8mpg.

  • CRFRider1987

Posted July 24, 2009 - 08:05 AM

#11

i wouldn't haul anything over 18 foot but dang do you really need any more? bikes, quads, and tools/gear don't take up that much room unless you're haulin the whole nighborhood...

  • Blur

Posted July 24, 2009 - 08:13 AM

#12

I used to be in the RV business a while back. TrailerLife Magazine used to publish tow ratings at their website.

When it comes to towing "container" trailers, make sure you distribute your weight properly. About 10% of the weight should be on the tongue.

Also, get a weight-distribution kit. These kits are designed to distribute the tongue weight over all four tires instead of just the rear.

Finally, if you're concerned about sway, you can get an integrated steering stabilizer. I consider the picture below to be better than the "Friction Sway bar" type (which are supposed to be removed when you back up). Use the "saddle type" instead.

So:
- keep it under the speed limit
- don't overload your truck
- distribute the weight properly
- install the correct gear
and you should be good to go :worthy:

Posted Image

  • Smacaroni

Posted July 24, 2009 - 08:19 AM

#13

I've tried to access that tow ratings database lately. None of the sites work that advertised it.
It looks like somebody had the bright idea to centralize the data... this is ordinarily fine, however, the centralized database took a dump and now no one has it.

The anti-sway system pictured above works awesome. I don't have a clue how it works, but it does. Used it on a Silverado 30 series. I'm not sure how big the trailer was, but it was big.

  • Blur

Posted July 24, 2009 - 08:28 AM

#14

Here's the link to the 2008 guide: http://www.trailerli...owGuide0801.pdf

The system works because of the bend in the bar that goes from the ball to the trailer. As the trailer turns, the bars is forced to bend more and puts more downward pressure on the saddle. So, the bar wants to keep its bend right over the saddle.

This reminds me.....
If you end up getting one of these kits installed, go somewhere with experience (like www.youngrv.com if you're near North Carolina :worthy:) or follow the directions closely to make sure the bend and saddle are lined up correctly. Otherwise, your trailers always pulling to one side.

Once it's installed, check it by driving perfectly straight for about 100 feet. Then stop and check to see if the bend is "settled" in over the saddle.

Hope this helps.

  • Smacaroni

Posted July 24, 2009 - 08:32 AM

#15

I prefer to not know how it works, just that it does work. I have enough useless information stored in my head as it is.

  • Blur

Posted July 24, 2009 - 01:10 PM

#16

I prefer to not know how it works, just that it does work. I have enough useless information stored in my head as it is.


Ha! I agree :banana:

But explaining stuff is just my nature.
My wife says that when someone asks me what time is it, I'm bad about explaining how to build the watch. :worthy:

  • kskyles

Posted July 24, 2009 - 01:29 PM

#17

Are the ford motors really that bad?



I don't think they're that bad. I haven't had any issues towing anything with my F-150.

I haven't towed a TH anywhere, but I've pulled a 22 foot box trailer that weighed about 5000 lbs with no issues.

Like people have been saying, the F-150 just isn't a heavy duty truck, and if you're towing anything close to the max towing capacity, it will struggle....like anything else.

  • 642MX

Posted July 24, 2009 - 01:41 PM

#18

Are the ford motors really that bad?


My Dad's 05 is. Its got the bigger v8 and struggles with his enclosed trailer, and gets below 10 mpg. He only has a GL1800 in the trailer (6x12), but its a pretty heavy bike.

I think his engine is rated at 300 horse, but it doesn't feel like 300 when your driving it. Its a nice truck, but its a dog.

  • 642MX

Posted July 24, 2009 - 01:44 PM

#19

I've looked myself, but am still wondering how much weight my half ton F150 could tow? It is a 2007 Supercrew Cab 2wd with the 5.4L V8. I am trying to understand what all the numbers and letters I've come across actually mean and how much my truck can tow, and tow safely. And what would the max length be to tow safely? I've heard 25-28ft. or less for a toy hauler?


Like others have said, I wouldn't tow much more than 6000 lbs. Make sure you have a tranny cooler (probably has one from the factory) and use your head while towing. The gas mileage will suck, but who cares?... your going riding. :worthy:

  • JJRace

Posted July 24, 2009 - 04:45 PM

#20

Let's not forget brakes.
Stopping is more important that being able to go.
Most vehicles will tow well beyond what they're rated for, however, trying to slow that mass down is a different story.
Not to mention cross-winds.


That is why RVs have trailer brakes. jeez. yes your truck has to have a brake controller, but that is minor.




 
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