Nuetech Tubliss system


15 replies to this topic
  • D Hartwig

Posted July 18, 2009 - 06:47 PM

#1

Has anyone tryed the Tubliss system with a tubeless Trials tire? How does it hold up? Any problems? Thanks

  • skookumrdr

Posted July 18, 2009 - 08:55 PM

#2

just installed tubliss on a tube type trials tire, first ride tommorow. It was a piece of cake to put on. The directions recommend lots of lube to get the seal so it might be tuff putting the tubless trials tire on since the inner diameter is a hair smaller than a tube rim.

  • vsekvsek

Posted July 18, 2009 - 09:13 PM

#3

after running it for 6 months the only thing I really noticed is it seems like the more often I swap one tire out for another I seem to get a slow leak. Slow enough thats not detetable. I am reluctant to put that green slime stuff in as the leak might only go flat after say two weeks(I might have a bent rim or something not sure). I love em otherwise. I run very low psi and the traction on my trials tire is to die for

  • Shuffler

Posted July 19, 2009 - 07:09 AM

#4

after running it for 6 months the only thing I really noticed is it seems like the more often I swap one tire out for another I seem to get a slow leak. Slow enough thats not detetable. I am reluctant to put that green slime stuff in as the leak might only go flat after say two weeks(I might have a bent rim or something not sure). I love em otherwise. I run very low psi and the traction on my trials tire is to die for


Just installed my rear last night...holding air and will get a shakedown ride in this week.

When installing a new tire, have you re-lubed the red liner? That might help with the slow leaks (?) but just a guess...

Slime is a crap product IMHO, so I'm running 8oz of RideOn sealant.

I thought the install was easy, and it really helps having a tire stand and big-ass tire spoons...

  • Mr. Neutron

Posted July 19, 2009 - 10:15 AM

#5

I've had TUbliss(es) in both ends for quite awhile now. I ran a Pirelli MT-43 trials tire in back with around 6 lbs. of pressure, in the Spark Plug enduro, a buncha practice rides before the Spark Plug, a buncha trail rides afterwards (Hood River), the TeePee Run Poker Run at McCubins' Gulch, & 1 practice at Mtn. View mx track. I also began using the TUbliss with a used Dunlop 730 something knobby, the one for sand & mud. A 733? A 736? Whatever, I forget what it is. I just know that knobby works really well at 8-10 lbs. of pressure....

I dunno, maybe I'm lucky. :worthy: When I mounted the Dunny knob in back, it was used already. It was "boogered up" on the tire's bead from my pathetic tire changing technique when I put it on & took it off to install the TUbliss setup. That tire has actually been on my bike's rear wheel 3 times, and off twice now. I've never ran any sealant. The first time I installed it, I did have to let the pressure out of both chambers, squirt some more soapy water on the bead, and re-air everything up, like I think the TUbliss instuctions say to do..... It's sealed really well for me ever since. Ditto for the Pirelli trials tire, and the Dunlop 756 (a mistake, I feel.... :banana: ) I'm now using, & the Michelin S-12 I had up front. These tires would lose about a pound or two over a couple of weeks of tire pressure, while the little inner tube/high pressure chamber would lose maybe 10 lbs. in that same time span. :banana: Again, I've never ran any sorta sealant at all. As much as I felt like playing with different tires, I figured sealant would just be a mess I didn't need. So far, I haven't needed any.....

Like Shuffler, I use 2 of the biggest tire spoon tools I've been able to find, & lotsa soapy water. Unlike Shuffler, I probably have the wolrld's worst tire changing ability, but it has certainly improved with all the tire changes lately, hee hee.... :banana:

And I know there will be some that will disagree with me here, and defend their choice of a trials tire as the best for most everyone else. And I do like trials tires; don't get me wrong. But I think that knobbies, with the lower pressures afforded by the TUbliss, actually work as well. For me, and the riding I do, anyways..... Certainly not for everyone, but I feel we tend to think that t-tires are a "magic traction pill" we can throw on, and instantly go anywhere. My experience seems to be that I can get stuck in certain types of riding sections just as easily as I can with a knobby. :banana: Regardless of what tire is on back, someone has to twist the throttle, and technique probably wins out over tire-type, most of the time..... I just feel you shouldn't discount a good knobby, at a decent tire pressure.....

Hope this helps some,
Jimmie

  • skookumrdr

Posted July 19, 2009 - 07:05 PM

#6

After my first ride with the tubliss I don't think I noticed a difference between a tube or the nuetech system. I guess I will never know how many pinch flats were avoided while running low pressure.

Diesel Goober is right a trials tire is not the 'end all, be all' but it sure was nice to ride up the 945 middle fork trail in the little naches and have no problems riding up the 5' tall rock ledge today.

  • vsekvsek

Posted July 19, 2009 - 08:19 PM

#7

When installing a new tire, have you re-lubed the red liner? That might help with the slow leaks (?) but just a guess...

Slime is a crap product IMHO, so I'm running 8oz of RideOn sealant.
.


Yeah, I was thinking of reseating again. Its not too bad a leak. Maybe one pse every 3/4 days but annoying.

I do love how you can run such low psi my confidence in climbing just about anything as simply skyrocketed from using these. I was too leary runing lower psi with tubes as I always seemed to be "the guy" who always gets a flat. Thats why I jumped on these. Going forward all my bike will have them now.

  • Tomsti

Posted July 20, 2009 - 07:04 PM

#8

I've put quite a few miles on my Tubliss now. I am running a S12 Michelin 19" rear on a CR250 and keep the tire pressure at 8 no matter what the terrain. I ride Walker, Reiter, Belfair and Taneum. Kind of a good cross section of different dirt, rocks, sand and mud. The with the new rear system I can climb about anything I can find within reason. It has really calmed down the 250 "hit" because it feels like instead of just spinning I can now get some traction and momentum.

Holding pressure - I check my tires every morning before a ride anyway so it doesn't bother me. After about a week of sitting between rides my 8 lbs will drop to almost 0. Not a big deal really I would also lose pressure when I was running a tube. The benefits for me far outweigh the hassle of checking pressure before I jump on.

I will be installing the front system here shortly.

Ride Hard!

  • silversurf

Posted July 20, 2009 - 08:03 PM

#9

Been pondering these for a bit. Did you guys find drilling the extra rim lock/tube/inflater hole a problem (i.e. nerve wracking)? I'd like to try these but am a little wary of drilling out my rims, esp since they're new.

Also, how do you guys find changing tires out? I know the trials lasts a long time, but swapping knobby for trials in certain situations might be nice...is it more or less hassle than a tube?

Thanks

  • vsekvsek

Posted July 20, 2009 - 08:14 PM

#10

Been pondering these for a bit. Did you guys find drilling the extra rim lock/tube/inflater hole a problem (i.e. nerve wracking)? I'd like to try these but am a little wary of drilling out my rims, esp since they're new.

Also, how do you guys find changing tires out? I know the trials lasts a long time, but swapping knobby for trials in certain situations might be nice...is it more or less hassle than a tube?

Thanks


Yes, very nerve wracking at first but I was desperate to solve my "flats" problem and the product worked so good I will gladly drill again. Drill baby drill!

Swapping tires is sooo much easier now. I got it down to about 20/30 minutes total time. Thats good for a squid like me that just a year again had no clue how to change a tire. The tires just pop in and back out once you get teh technique down

  • trav

Posted July 20, 2009 - 11:42 PM

#11

Been pondering these for a bit. Did you guys find drilling the extra rim lock/tube/inflater hole a problem (i.e. nerve wracking)? I'd like to try these but am a little wary of drilling out my rims, esp since they're new


is this on your ktm? your rimlock and tube holes should already be adjacent, so you will only need to increase one of the existing holes to 10mm. I wouldn't be worried. even going back to tube it won't be an issue.

I am loving the tubliss! haven't tried it on the trials yet, but as mentioned above you can run a knobby at such low pressure they hook up like mad.

I know a few people have had issue with S12/M12 due to ribs on the bead preventing a seal.

  • silversurf

Posted July 21, 2009 - 06:05 AM

#12

is this on your ktm? your rimlock and tube holes should already be adjacent, so you will only need to increase one of the existing holes to 10mm. I wouldn't be worried. even going back to tube it won't be an issue.

I am loving the tubliss! haven't tried it on the trials yet, but as mentioned above you can run a knobby at such low pressure they hook up like mad.

I know a few people have had issue with S12/M12 due to ribs on the bead preventing a seal.


Yup on my 300. Ah, that makes it even easier if this is the case. Sweet...thanks

  • gleeloyd

Posted July 30, 2009 - 02:02 PM

#13

I own a tubliss in all three sizes because I have two wheels for the rear - one with a trials tire and one with a knobby. Lower pressure in the rear is great for traction but lower pressure (8 psi) in the front provides exceptional control in the rocks where you would normally be getting the front end kicked side to side. There is no threat of rim damage due to the low pressure because of the way the tubliss holds your tire's beads straight up at all times. I found myself checking the tubliss core's pressure frequently though. Put 110 psi in the morning and after lunch it would be down to 85 or so.

  • Chuck.

Posted July 30, 2009 - 09:06 PM

#14

I agree with gleeloyd about the tubliss; I'm running a Tubliss with a Dunlop 803 radial tubeless Trials tire. No problems, I run it at 8psi. and I love the traction, but it does slide differently than a knobby. I did have problems geting the tire to seat properly on the rim, seems to be a fit issue between the tire ID and the rim bead OD.

On my latest XR I've run my front as low as 4psi to reduce harhness in rock fields and I can see where the tire has folded down the outside of the rim from hits but so far no rim damage or pinch flats. I plan to replace the damper rod forks with a set of cartridge forks in the next week or so and then maybe I can bump up the front tire pressure up a bit.

  • silversurf

Posted July 31, 2009 - 05:40 AM

#15

I agree with gleeloyd about the tubliss; I'm running a Tubliss with a Dunlop 803 radial tubeless Trials tire. No problems, I run it at 8psi. and I love the traction, but it does slide differently than a knobby. I did have problems geting the tire to seat properly on the rim, seems to be a fit issue between the tire ID and the rim bead OD.

On my latest XR I've run my front as low as 4psi to reduce harhness in rock fields and I can see where the tire has folded down the outside of the rim from hits but so far no rim damage or pinch flats. I plan to replace the damper rod forks with a set of cartridge forks in the next week or so and then maybe I can bump up the front tire pressure up a bit.


Do you guys run the tubeless trials tire model or the standard tubed tire with the Tubliss system?

I went looking at trials tires and as you all probably know there's a choice and wasn't sure what works best.

  • Chuck.

Posted July 31, 2009 - 12:37 PM

#16

I don't know how each tire model is built but a good smooth bead area for sealing is important on a tubeless tire, and at one time tubeless tires had an extra coating on the inside to seal the carcess. On my Dunlop 803 tubeless trials tire the inside of each side wall has a series of short diagonal ribs which I suspect could damage a tube as the sidewall flexes.

Folks are running tube knobbies using the Tubliss without leakage problems so I think it doesn't matter, excepth for the ribs inside my Dunlop. I also think the biggest advantage from using a Trials tire is from the Radial ply construction; not all Trials tires are radial so look for the "R" on the sidewall e.g. 4.00R18.





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