has anyone messed with suspension



11 replies to this topic
  • comp182

Posted September 18, 2002 - 01:13 PM

#1

Has antone

  • Woodzi

Posted September 18, 2002 - 01:51 PM

#2

Race Tech works great and you get a video with the kit that shows you how to install. I had mine done last winter and I am very happy with the results.

There are many changes you can make, even with the stock suspension - preload, oil heights, clickers, etc. Take some time to learn what they do and try some changes.

  • blue_beast_wins

Posted September 18, 2002 - 03:52 PM

#3

My brother and myself have just started messing with our standard settings after finding 250-300km rides very painfull in the legs the next day, read your manual there is plenty of info on how to adjust it. It has totaly transformed ours.

  • comp182

Posted September 18, 2002 - 06:11 PM

#4

woodzi did you do this your self? What areas did you notice the big dif.

  • comp182

Posted September 18, 2002 - 06:12 PM

#5

woodzi did you do this your self? What areas did you notice the big dif.

  • Steve_WR400F_#61t

Posted September 18, 2002 - 08:08 PM

#6

Stock WR suspensions are pretty damn good as is. The first thing I would do is take a good look at the manual and learn what your clickers do. Then check out what your bike is set at now. Make sure you write everything down. After everything is written down, take your bike out to one of your normal riding areas that you know really well. Then Ride a section or two. While riding pay attention to what your bike is doing and how it feels.
Once you've done that, set your clickers to the stock settings. Go back to the same sections and ride them again. Now see how the bike feels and reacts, what are the differences? Like it better? Like the original settings you had? From there either make small adjustments either towards you original settings or away if you like the stock a bit better. Best to make these at 2 click increments. Then just keep doing this until you've got the bike set up the way it feels best to you.

If you run out of clicks on your forks, adjust your oil levels a little & start over. Add oil to make it stiffer, remove a little to soften it. If you get to the max/min oil levels and your still looking for more, than it's time to contact RaceTech, or other suspension co, and see what they can do.

My 2000 WR400 still has it's stock springs & valving and works great. I'm not the smallest guy in the world either, 6'3 & 215#. A friend of mine is a really fast MXer, & expert desert racer, and he loves my suspension over his when were out on the trails. We've also done some team desert races & he prefers to use my bike because the suspension works so much better than his MX only YZ426.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Woodzi

Posted September 19, 2002 - 03:17 AM

#7

I had the work done at a dealer. It's not that difficult to do yourself though. The kits come with videos that walk you through the process. There are some special tools required, but they can be made easily.

I ride mostly tight single track. The stock suspension is a little harsh in these conditions. After the Race Tech valves were installed the ride in the slow stuff was much better. You can ride over a good size log or rock and hardly feel it. The Race Tech pistons have a much larger area for oil to flow. This allows the valves to control the damping at a higher speed, as opposed to the area of the piston restricting the flow. A valve has a linear force-velocity relationship while a restriction increases damping force with the square of velocity. It also works pretty good for high speeds or MX, but it is too soft for really big jumps.

Overall the suspension performs great in the conditions where I want it to (off road) and is versatile enough to perform well everywhere I have tried it. The dealer who did the work told me that he has installed Race Tech valves in a number of applications, and it has always worked as promised.

  • YAMAKAZE

Posted September 19, 2002 - 03:20 AM

#8

The stock suspension is fine for a beginner rider that is not doing any kind of serious racing or jumping, additionally it is set for a rider up to 180lbs. If you exceed any of these you will need to have the suspension professionally valved. Otherwise you are going to be bottoming out the suspension routinely, which is a giant pain in the wrists, knees,ankles and Back. Not to mention injuries from crashes due to suspension bounce.

My suspension is fantastic.....30-50ft jump landings are like landing on a pillow (Thanks to MXTuner) Rocks, Roots, and Ruts are absorbed and control is awesome(add a Steering dampner...Thanks MXTuner again) and never any arm pump....plus mega control on fast stuff with zero headshake.

How much money you spend will determine how much control and comfort you get...Personally I'm old and want ALL the Comfort I can afford.

Bonzai :)

  • Highsider1

Posted September 19, 2002 - 02:52 PM

#9

230 lbs and all I did was set the preload on the rear. Have a section 1-1/4 mile 18" whoops and I had the bike all out, my guess 65MPH, and it handled like a dream. Another section of 3-4' whoops, I slammed quite hard a couple of times into the next whoop and never bottomed or lost control. Best suspension I have ever had. Best part is it has lots of room for adjustment should I ever find it necessary.

  • comp182

Posted September 19, 2002 - 04:42 PM

#10

ok I wiegh 250lbs. The problem that I have is cornering. The bike just feels like it wants to push or the front wants to slide. I have a YZ seat and tank on the bike and can set my nuts on the tank and it still pushes. What are your thoughts.

For those colorado Guys I ride all over. Last week I rode from Lake City to Silverton, Silvedrton to Teluride, Telluride to Ouray, Ouray back to Lake City. By far the best riding that I have found ever.

  • blue_beast_wins

Posted September 30, 2002 - 12:16 AM

#11

More rear brke slide often comes in handy.

  • John_Curea

Posted September 30, 2002 - 02:46 AM

#12

comp182

If the front is "washing" or sliding out, rebound damping that is too fast could be the problem.

When we go into a turn, the front end compresses (this will tighten up the steering geometry and put more weight on the front wheel for increased traction).

If the rebound is too fast, on a flat turn, the front forks will extend too fast and actually "push" the front wheel across the terrain. In a rutted turn this will cause the front wheel to climb out of the rut.

On the flip side, if the rebound is too slow, the front wheel will "bite" so hard (and stink-bug)that the back end will have a tendency to slide out.

Check the rebound setting of your front forks for starters, I would use 10 out as a starting point. There are no magical clicker settings, every bike, rider, riding style, and suspension (to a point) differs from the next.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.