Estimated time for install of AIS 1.8 hrs


13 replies to this topic
  • rkwfxd1

Posted July 12, 2009 - 07:44 PM

#1

:banana: :banana: :banana: Not in my lifetime. More like 8.1 hours :worthy:

I believe I displayed a super human amount of patience as I tore into and re-assembled the chinese puzzle of a bike I call my WR450F. I do not believe my wife heard a single:foul:

But wow. Not sure if I will EVER work on it again. I think it would be easier to walk up and down the street and wash cars for $5 a car until I have enough to pay the dealer to work on this beast.

Anyway half way through the re-assembly I had to hit TT to get some hints on how to get the air box boot back on the carb bell - found it, it worked, love this site.

So I have all the internal mods completed. I did not do the gray wire mod yet or the pee shooter. I will take care of those in the AM when I have more light.

The bike starts and seems to run fine but as I rev it up it is almost like it has an electronic rev limiter, I am guessing this will go away once I disconnect the gray wire.

Any thoughts?

  • Pangia

Posted July 12, 2009 - 09:00 PM

#2

I'm a newbie who is getting ready to do the same to my '08 WR450 in a few weeks. I don't have the expertise to answer your question, but I will follow your thread to see what you learn. I will also be in the 8.1 (not 1.8) hour category for the AIS mod.

Hope it all goes well!!
:worthy:

  • rkwfxd1

Posted July 13, 2009 - 02:50 AM

#3

Well, to be honest, this is about my 30th motorcycle, I have re-jetted many of them and built a Harley from the ground up. I have a garage full of tools and think I am a better than average mechanic but for this discussion I will assume I am an average mechanic.

The first thing I learned is that if my local dealer offered to do the install for 1.8 hrs of labor, as the instructions say, at $70 per hours that is $126 and I would just write a check and let them handle it. I do not know what my dealer would charge to install the kit cuz I did not ask.

But, if you like to do things yourself, like me, then here is a brief rundown on the install process. (At least my install process)

Remove seat and side covers (10mm)
Remove radiator shrouds and gas tank (8mm)
Remove rear half of exhaust (10mm)
Loosen Air box boot to carb clamp and carb to engine boot clamps (allen)
Remove bolts holding rear sub frame on (10mm) The sub frame was still attached to the bike via wires and cables and tubes but I could move it around
Loosen coolant overflow tubes - I disconnected the black one from the overflow tank, I re-routed the clear one with coolant in it from around and under the CDI box on the left. This gave me plenty of play to move the sub frame around.
Remove two breather tubes from air box, one upper and one lower.
Remove rear shock (14mm top 17mm bottom)
Remove hot start cable from left side of top of carb (14mm)
Disconnect TPS plug from left side of bike near left radiator (this wire is attached to hot start cable with a black clamp that can be pried open or unsnapped.
Remove throttle cable cover from right side of carb
Remove throttle cables (loosen bottom cable first (10mm) and it pops right off and then once you have the cable removed from the throttle bell, you can wrist the throttle and get plenty of slack in the cable to remove the top cable from the bell. Unscrew the nut holding that cable to the carb (10mm) and the cable comes right off.

At this point there pretty much should be nothing holding the carb on. Remove the carb from the bike. It has about five tubes dropping down through a loose clamp and the frame swing-arm and bottom of the bike. Pull gently and evenly and watch for those tubes to get hung up as well as the TPS wire.

Once the carb is out, install the jets and needle as per the instructions. You will need a small allen wrench to remove the float bowl and top of carb. You will need a small flat blade screwdriver to remove some of the jets. I used a small adjustable wrench to remove the main jet. Once finished, re-install in reverse order. You can not see the needle in the top of the carb and it does not just drop out like in a CV carb, it is secured under an allen head screw on the top of the slide.

Tips:
I had a very difficult time getting the hot start cable threaded back into the top of the carb. I finally used a hose clamp on the handle bar to pull and hold the hot start lever and compress the spring and retract the plunger. This helped a lot.

After the carb is installed and tightened the engine side clamp is tightened and the rear shock is installed it it is time to re-install the air box to carb boot.

First, loosen the air box clamp as much as you can. Then, I loosely installed the long bolt that holds the top of the sub frame to the frame. Lifted the sub frame, and sprayed some pam on the carb bell housing (WD40 or other lube would also work). Pivot the sub frame down and hopefully the boot will slide right over the carb. It took me a few tries but eventually I got it. Tighten the clamp then install the lower bolts that hold the sub frame on.

Re assemble the rest of the bike.

I left my actual AIS installed because they check for that in some places in California and its only performance gain is a lose of 1 pound. So far the lean pop from the AIS has not bothered me.

Good luck but again, if I knew then what I know now I would have at least asked my dealer for an estimate on the install. Example - I can and do change tires and fix flats while on camping and riding trips but at home I am glad to pay the dealer to wrestle with those black monsters.

  • KennyMc

Posted July 13, 2009 - 07:44 AM

#4

:banana: :banana: :banana: Not in my lifetime. More like 8.1 hours :worthy:

I believe I displayed a super human amount of patience as I tore into and re-assembled the chinese puzzle of a bike I call my WR450F. I do not believe my wife heard a single:foul:

But wow. Not sure if I will EVER work on it again. I think it would be easier to walk up and down the street and wash cars for $5 a car until I have enough to pay the dealer to work on this beast.

Anyway half way through the re-assembly I had to hit TT to get some hints on how to get the air box boot back on the carb bell - found it, it worked, love this site.

So I have all the internal mods completed. I did not do the gray wire mod yet or the pee shooter. I will take care of those in the AM when I have more light.

The bike starts and seems to run fine but as I rev it up it is almost like it has an electronic rev limiter, I am guessing this will go away once I disconnect the gray wire.

Any thoughts?


In reading your very detailed jetting description (nice job), you don't mention the throttle stop replacement. Did you do this? If not, that is the non-electronic rev limiter.

  • Krannie McKranface

Posted July 13, 2009 - 08:58 AM

#5

You don't need to remove the carb from the bike. Just get it out of the back boot, and wrestle it into the position you need to do the task at hand.

  • rkwfxd1

Posted July 13, 2009 - 01:24 PM

#6

Yes I did replace the throttle stop.

Krannie, you are correct one does not NEED to remove the carb, it can be flipped and twisted while in the bike, in fact, this is what I did the FIRST time.

Why the first time, because after I put the carb all back together and was starting to put the bike together I realized that while twisting it and flipping it and installing the R&D flex fuel screw, at some point the entire float fell out and I did not notice before I put the float bowl back on:banghead: :worthy:

Go ahead and laugh at me, I thought it was pretty funny too. 2nd time I just pulled the carb off the bike and did it "right."

  • FMAGX

Posted July 13, 2009 - 05:06 PM

#7

this is my first post to TT been lurking for a while. I have an 08 450 and have rejetted 3 times. first time removed the AIS and installed the GYTR kit, way too rich! reinstalled factory jets while waiting on JD kit, then installed JD 168main and needle, Waaay better, feels like a different bike. I can rejet now in the 1.8hrs. one thing I learned is there is no need to remove the subframe, just pivot it forward and leave all of the hoses and wires in place. hope this helps learned the hard way.

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  • Deserthound

Posted July 13, 2009 - 09:03 PM

#8

I also went through the jetting nightmare the first time and didn't know about the subframe swing trick. That would have saved me at least an hour. :worthy:
One trick I've learned is that you can change the pilot and main jets through the 17 mm plug on the bottom of the float bowl without moving the carb. It's a little tricky, but with a short flat head screw driver and a socket, I can swap them both in about ten minutes. The hardest part is getting the pilot back up into the carb. There is a number of ways to do this but I lay the bike on it's side and it makes it way easier.

  • superbad

Posted August 05, 2009 - 04:42 PM

#9

I also went through the jetting nightmare the first time and didn't know about the subframe swing trick. That would have saved me at least an hour. :thumbsup:
One trick I've learned is that you can change the pilot and main jets through the 17 mm plug on the bottom of the float bowl without moving the carb. It's a little tricky, but with a short flat head screw driver and a socket, I can swap them both in about ten minutes. The hardest part is getting the pilot back up into the carb. There is a number of ways to do this but I lay the bike on it's side and it makes it way easier.


Are you saying you can change the main and pilot without removing the shock, subframe foldup, etc.? I hate working anywhere near my carb!

  • tribalbc

Posted August 05, 2009 - 05:05 PM

#10

The main and pilot can be done with a mirror and short screwdriver and socket driver.

Here's a pic of the subframe trick. Just remove bottom bolts and loosen top.



Posted Image

  • Deserthound

Posted August 05, 2009 - 07:15 PM

#11

Are you saying you can change the main and pilot without removing the shock, subframe foldup, etc.? I hate working anywhere near my carb!


Yes you can. It's tight, but it can be done. Turn off the gas, drain the fuel from the bowl with the allen head drain screw, remove the 17mm plug from the bottom of the bowl, move the black vent hose out of the way and you can get to both of them.:thumbsup:

  • rkwfxd1

Posted August 05, 2009 - 08:25 PM

#12

Yes you can. It's tight, but it can be done. Turn off the gas, drain the fuel from the bowl with the allen head drain screw, remove the 17mm plug from the bottom of the bowl, move the black vent hose out of the way and you can get to both of them.:thumbsup:


Prove it! Let me know when I can bring my bike over.:worthy:

  • Deserthound

Posted August 05, 2009 - 09:17 PM

#13

Prove it! Let me know when I can bring my bike over.:thumbsup:


I tell you what... I just got a new Dunlop 739 AT. I'll swap your jets if you change my rear tire. LOL :worthy:

  • rkwfxd1

Posted August 05, 2009 - 11:53 PM

#14

I tell you what... I just got a new Dunlop 739 AT. I'll swap your jets if you change my rear tire. LOL :thumbsup:


Got me:worthy:

Been there done that. No thanks. Man I HATE changing tires. So much so that I have pretty much decided that unless I am fixing a flat on a camping trip I am going to pull the wheel and pay the dealer.

Cost a few bucks but my wife has noticed there is a LOT less profanity involved.

Ride Safe.




 
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