Dipstick Replacement


25 replies to this topic
  • WR450F_RDR

Posted July 04, 2009 - 03:14 PM

#1

I am sure this may have been discussed before. I have an 08 YZ450F and was curious if anyone made an aftermarket dipstick for it. The stock plastic one is a pain in the back side sometimes, seems very easy to cross thread it. I did a search and didnt find anything here or on Google. I could have missed something though. Any help would be appreciated.

  • Whyzee429

Posted July 04, 2009 - 06:18 PM

#2

dude, the dipstick on my 07 450 is just plain ugly, in my opinion. I never take it off so I can deal with just a plug like the timing cover plugs. I too, have not found a company that makes them. Seems like it would be incredibly simple for WC or Ride Eng. to make :/

  • WR450F_RDR

Posted July 05, 2009 - 06:36 AM

#3

I have found a couple of companies that make them for the YFZ quad but not the YZ450F. I think the motors are similiar but don't know if the dipstick is the same?

  • Aka.Goose

Posted July 05, 2009 - 09:43 AM

#4

Sorry to rub it in, but here's mine...Billet, red anodized...
Got hooked up through another member here on TT who is a machinist...
But, I scored the very last one, sorry!
Posted Image

  • WR450F_RDR

Posted July 05, 2009 - 10:53 AM

#5

Nice work. your friend needs to go into business and produce some more. I am sure i am not the only one who would like replace theirs.

  • Aka.Goose

Posted July 05, 2009 - 11:24 AM

#6

Well that's what he was thinking, but there wasn't a big demand for $25 dipsticks...

  • grayracer513

Posted July 05, 2009 - 12:24 PM

#7

Well that's what he was thinking, but there wasn't a big demand for $25 dipsticks...

Having made 4 of these, I can tell you that even using CNC machinery, $25 wouldn't come close to what you'd have to charge for them. You could probably have them made offshore for $50.

I actually use the stock one because it's easier to make it stay tight without tools.

  • Aka.Goose

Posted July 05, 2009 - 02:00 PM

#8

$50!?! Well then I'm even more stoked with it!
Uses the stock o-ring, haven't had a problem with it coming loose after finger tightening...Couple more pics:
Posted Image
Posted Image

  • grayracer513

Posted July 05, 2009 - 04:23 PM

#9

The thing is that while there are a number of different ways to approach this part, it requires AT LEAST two separate setups in different machines, and cutting threads on a lathe is an operation that is difficult to automate without computers.

The the basic diameters would be cut full length first, from top to bottom, large to small. Then the "stick" portion must be cut, and the hi/lo marks added. Next, the threads would be cut and the sealing face surfaced. After that the basic shape of the upper section is finished, and the part cut off the stock.

The easiest way to cut the flutes in the knob is on a vertical mill with a rotary table, but there is so little material to chuck the part by on the lower half that I felt like it was necessary to make a threaded fixture into which I could screw the part to better hold it.

I can't think of a practical way to do the job without at least that much fooling around, so I figure it's worth more than your typical timing plug is. The next one I make, if any, is going to be much simpler.

  • urgreathero

Posted July 05, 2009 - 04:26 PM

#10

i found out the more i used mine the better it got

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  • grayracer513

Posted July 05, 2009 - 04:34 PM

#11

i found out the more i used mine the better it got

Once you stop staring at it, it's not nearly as ugly, either. :worthy: Some people are way too hung up on non-functional bling.

My original concern with these was having one struck by a stone off the front tire and sheared off flush, so it couldn't be removed easily, but a simple bit of plastic between the frame tubes solved that, and my current skid plate takes care of the problem, too.

  • WR450F_RDR

Posted July 05, 2009 - 07:08 PM

#12

I could care less myself for the bling aspect of it. I am looking for something functional. I have already partially cross threaded the thing once.

  • husqy360

Posted July 05, 2009 - 09:02 PM

#13

for me practice made perfect, but yes in the begining it was a little tough.

  • urgreathero

Posted July 06, 2009 - 02:30 AM

#14

Once you stop staring at it, it's not nearly as ugly, either. :worthy: Some people are way too hung up on non-functional bling.

My original concern with these was having one struck by a stone off the front tire and sheared off flush, so it couldn't be removed easily, but a simple bit of plastic between the frame tubes solved that, and my current skid plate takes care of the problem, too.


lmao:smirk: havent broken mine yet O:], bent the radiator above it though O:]

  • WB450

Posted July 06, 2009 - 07:11 AM

#15

Like this?

Posted Image

  • Ga426owner

Posted July 06, 2009 - 08:29 AM

#16

Like this?

Posted Image


yea I have this one - only problem is my eyes can't see the right line level so I had to get the dremel out for better viewing:banghead:

  • Aka.Goose

Posted July 06, 2009 - 09:45 AM

#17

Like this?

Posted Image


:worthy: :banana: :banana:
you rule...

  • Sprew

Posted July 06, 2009 - 09:11 PM

#18

The thing is that while there are a number of different ways to approach this part, it requires AT LEAST two separate setups in different machines, and cutting threads on a lathe is an operation that is difficult to automate without computers.

The the basic diameters would be cut full length first, from top to bottom, large to small. Then the "stick" portion must be cut, and the hi/lo marks added. Next, the threads would be cut and the sealing face surfaced. After that the basic shape of the upper section is finished, and the part cut off the stock.

The easiest way to cut the flutes in the knob is on a vertical mill with a rotary table, but there is so little material to chuck the part by on the lower half that I felt like it was necessary to make a threaded fixture into which I could screw the part to better hold it.

I can't think of a practical way to do the job without at least that much fooling around, so I figure it's worth more than your typical timing plug is. The next one I make, if any, is going to be much simpler.


Thats a nice knob. 25 is a fair price. It could be done in one machine (VMC) with two setups, side by side. It depends what quality you were trying to acheive. It could also be done without a rotary table. I cant tell from the picture if the measuring area was flatened and cross hatched. I think not but cant be sure. Everything above the thread needs to be rethought weightwise. But the bling factor is there. Everything looks better red anodized.

The entire part could be run on a swiss, one shot. But I would opt to run the front half only and set up the "knob" portion in a VMC. That would be the best way to acheive the perpendicular corner rounding. And CNC is the only way to be productive, but thats another topic.

Again.....nice knob.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 07, 2009 - 11:14 AM

#19

...I would opt to run the front half only and set up the "knob" portion in a VMC. That would be the best way to acheive the perpendicular corner rounding. And CNC is the only way to be productive, but thats another topic.

Again.....nice knob.

Something like what I said in the first place.

  • Sprew

Posted July 07, 2009 - 09:03 PM

#20

Any possibility of posting a pic of one of your dipsticks?





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