What is the best way to get my air filter "REALLY CLEAN"


87 replies to this topic
  • MX RIDER 778

Posted May 28, 2009 - 03:48 PM

#1

What is the best way to clean my air filter? I use laundry soap but doesnt get all the black out. I scrub and scrub but it seems there has to be an easier way or maybe faster way the filter was red i would like it to be that way after it is washed any tips?
I have searched the forum many differant ways and no luck please help TT'ers

  • MX RIDER 778

Posted May 28, 2009 - 03:56 PM

#2

Anyone???

  • SBMX

Posted May 28, 2009 - 03:58 PM

#3

I used to use diesel gas, it worked pretty well. Now I use the K&N air filter cleaner and oil, it works miracles. Just spray on generously, wait ten minutes, then run some water through and it's perfect. Spray on the oil after it has dried and throw it back in your bike.

  • OrangeYZ

Posted May 28, 2009 - 03:58 PM

#4

I use some sort of simple green type generic cleaner with hot water and that gets all of the nasty stuff and about 70% of the black out. Aerosol filter cleaner gets more like 90% of the black out.

I bet if your thread title had something like "How do I get my air filter real clean" in it, you'll end up with more useful responses than having the completely unrelated "2 stroke" up there.

  • MX RIDER 778

Posted May 28, 2009 - 04:03 PM

#5

Alright thanks for the info andfast replies I must be to new for the whole gas thing? thanks anyway

  • Chokey

Posted May 28, 2009 - 04:11 PM

#6

Servicing Your Air Filter

Your air filter is one of the most important components of your bike. A properly maintained filter will ensure that the engine only receives a diet of clean air. A poorly oiled or improperly installed air filter will allow abrasive dirt particles to enter your engine, causing rapid wear and premature failure, followed by expensive repairs.

To clean your filter correctly, you need the following items:

1. A mild solvent, such as Simple Green, mineral spirits, or kerosene, to remove the filter oil. Those of you that use No-Toil or K&N filters will need to use the specified cleaners for your application. I prefer kerosene for cleaning standard filter oil, but any good degreaser works fine.

2. 2 containers large enough to easily hold the filter, and to be able to clean it without spilling the contents. I use two 5-gallon buckets for this.

3. Mild soap and water.

4. The filter oil of your choice. Make sure that you use genuine filter oil. Other types of oils don’t become thick and tacky the way filter oil does, so they don’t trap the dirt as effectively, and gravity will pull them to the bottom of the filter and into the air boot, where the oil will clog the pilot and choke air passage intakes in the mouth of the carburetor.

5. Waterproof grease.

6. Plastic or latex gloves are a good idea whenever you are working with strong chemicals or petroleum products. These types of chemicals are murder on your skin, and they are potentially hazardous to your health, as well. I use long Playtex oven-cleaning gloves. Eye protection is also advisable. You’ll understand why if you splash some kerosene or mineral spirits in your eye, it’s not fun.

Cleaning your filter is an easy task, and should be done on a regular basis, to ensure the proper protection for your engine.

1. Remove the seat to access the filter. You KTM guys have it easy here, just pull the side cover off.

2. Remove the filter, being careful not to drop any dirt into the carburetor mouth.

3. Check to see if any dirt is present in the air boot. Clean the air boot thoroughly with a clean, solvent-soaked rag. Be sure not to dislodge any dirt from the air box that may fall into the carb. Stuff a rag into the air boot to keep any dirt out. Clean the air box completely. If you don’t, any dirt that is clinging to the sides will fall into the carb when you re-install the filter.

Now, we are ready to clean the filter.

4. Submerge the filter in the bucket of solvent, and gently squeeze and release the filter several times to ensure that all of the old oil is loosened and removed by the solvent. Never twist or wring a filter, as that will break the tiny walls that separate the individual pores of the filter, greatly reducing the surface area available to trap dirt.

5. Now wash the filter in the bucket of mild soapy water. Again, gently squeeze and release the filter, to force the soapy water in and out through the pores of the filter material. Rinse the filter in the same manner. Repeat until you see clean water when rinsing the filter. Hold the filter in front of a bright light, and look through it. You can see if there is any remaining dirt trapped in the filter. Clean again if necessary. Let the filter dry.

6. Now it’s time to oil the filter. I find it to be much easier and cleaner to do this inside a large freezer bag. Pour a small stream of oil onto the filter surface, all the way around the filter’s circumference, covering about 1/3 of the surface. Squeeze the filter inside the bag, working the oil into the filter, and spreading it evenly across the surface of the filter. Continue until the filter is uniformly covered. Add more oil as necessary to completely cover the entire filter. Now hold the bag upside down, with it open, over a container to catch the excess oil. Give the entire filter a strong, firm squeeze, to remove any excess oil. Too much oil will make your bike run poorly, and will migrate into the tiny air passages in the intake mouth of the carb, clogging them.

7. Run a thin bead of waterproof grease all the way around the sealing edge of the filter, covering the lip from edge to edge. This is to ensure a good seal against the surface of the air box, to prevent any dirt from leaking around the filter. If your filter or air box is equipped with a neoprene gasket at the sealing area, you do not need to do this.

8. Remember the rag we stuffed in the air boot? Don’t forget to remove it at this time! Don’t laugh, it isn’t as hard as you think to forget this little detail, and it will ruin your riding day when you can’t understand why your bike won’t start.

9. Install the filter onto its frame, and install the assembly into the air box. With your finger, put a small dab of grease over the hole that the filter retainer bolt goes through, to prevent dirt from being sucked through here. Install and tighten the filter retainer. Check all the way around the filter to ensure that it is in place and seated properly.

10. With a clean rag, remove any grease that you may have gotten on the inside of the air box, to prevent dirt build-up.

11. Now, re-install the seat or air box cover. The filter should be allowed at least one hour to dry before riding, so that the solvents in the oil can evaporate, changing the filter oil into a very sticky residue that will do an excellent job of trapping dirt. Riding on a freshly oiled filter usually makes your bike run raspy and rough, because the engine is burning the solvent vapors that are evaporating from the filter oil.

Even if your filter doesn’t get dirty, or you don’t go riding for some reason, filter oil begins to lose its ability to trap dirt effectively after about a week. If it has been longer than a week since you oiled the filter, it needs to be re-oiled, even if it doesn’t need cleaning.

Go ride, and enjoy the knowledge that your engine is breathing the cleanest air that you can give it!


  • Aaron_Silidker

Posted May 28, 2009 - 04:15 PM

#7

Mineral spirits, mineral spirits, mineral spirits...get my drift? Mineral spirits.

  • Salt n Pepper

Posted May 28, 2009 - 05:22 PM

#8

Where do you get mineral spirits?

  • ncfmx

Posted May 28, 2009 - 05:24 PM

#9

:crazy: NO-TOIL

  • gruberyz

Posted May 28, 2009 - 05:25 PM

#10

I use kerosene then hot soapy water. If it's really a nasty filter like after a race in the mesquite trees I just toss it and get another one.

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  • Harry Paratestes

Posted May 28, 2009 - 05:47 PM

#11

rinse it in a bucket of solvent,kerosene,varsol,mineral spirits, they all do the job.
DO NOT USE GASOLINE.
Rinse in warm soapy water, then in clear water. Air dry,don't use heat.
If it is still dirty,start over.

  • MX RIDER 778

Posted May 28, 2009 - 06:40 PM

#12

Servicing Your Air Filter

Your air filter is one of the most important components of your bike. A properly maintained filter will ensure that the engine only receives a diet of clean air. A poorly oiled or improperly installed air filter will allow abrasive dirt particles to enter your engine, causing rapid wear and premature failure, followed by expensive repairs.

To clean your filter correctly, you need the following items:

1. A mild solvent, such as Simple Green, mineral spirits, or kerosene, to remove the filter oil. Those of you that use No-Toil or K&N filters will need to use the specified cleaners for your application. I prefer kerosene for cleaning standard filter oil, but any good degreaser works fine.

2. 2 containers large enough to easily hold the filter, and to be able to clean it without spilling the contents. I use two 5-gallon buckets for this.

3. Mild soap and water.

4. The filter oil of your choice. Make sure that you use genuine filter oil. Other types of oils don’t become thick and tacky the way filter oil does, so they don’t trap the dirt as effectively, and gravity will pull them to the bottom of the filter and into the air boot, where the oil will clog the pilot and choke air passage intakes in the mouth of the carburetor.

5. Waterproof grease.

6. Plastic or latex gloves are a good idea whenever you are working with strong chemicals or petroleum products. These types of chemicals are murder on your skin, and they are potentially hazardous to your health, as well. I use long Playtex oven-cleaning gloves. Eye protection is also advisable. You’ll understand why if you splash some kerosene or mineral spirits in your eye, it’s not fun.

Cleaning your filter is an easy task, and should be done on a regular basis, to ensure the proper protection for your engine.

1. Remove the seat to access the filter. You KTM guys have it easy here, just pull the side cover off.

2. Remove the filter, being careful not to drop any dirt into the carburetor mouth.

3. Check to see if any dirt is present in the air boot. Clean the air boot thoroughly with a clean, solvent-soaked rag. Be sure not to dislodge any dirt from the air box that may fall into the carb. Stuff a rag into the air boot to keep any dirt out. Clean the air box completely. If you don’t, any dirt that is clinging to the sides will fall into the carb when you re-install the filter.

Now, we are ready to clean the filter.

4. Submerge the filter in the bucket of solvent, and gently squeeze and release the filter several times to ensure that all of the old oil is loosened and removed by the solvent. Never twist or wring a filter, as that will break the tiny walls that separate the individual pores of the filter, greatly reducing the surface area available to trap dirt.

5. Now wash the filter in the bucket of mild soapy water. Again, gently squeeze and release the filter, to force the soapy water in and out through the pores of the filter material. Rinse the filter in the same manner. Repeat until you see clean water when rinsing the filter. Hold the filter in front of a bright light, and look through it. You can see if there is any remaining dirt trapped in the filter. Clean again if necessary. Let the filter dry.

6. Now it’s time to oil the filter. I find it to be much easier and cleaner to do this inside a large freezer bag. Pour a small stream of oil onto the filter surface, all the way around the filter’s circumference, covering about 1/3 of the surface. Squeeze the filter inside the bag, working the oil into the filter, and spreading it evenly across the surface of the filter. Continue until the filter is uniformly covered. Add more oil as necessary to completely cover the entire filter. Now hold the bag upside down, with it open, over a container to catch the excess oil. Give the entire filter a strong, firm squeeze, to remove any excess oil. Too much oil will make your bike run poorly, and will migrate into the tiny air passages in the intake mouth of the carb, clogging them.

7. Run a thin bead of waterproof grease all the way around the sealing edge of the filter, covering the lip from edge to edge. This is to ensure a good seal against the surface of the air box, to prevent any dirt from leaking around the filter. If your filter or air box is equipped with a neoprene gasket at the sealing area, you do not need to do this.

8. Remember the rag we stuffed in the air boot? Don’t forget to remove it at this time! Don’t laugh, it isn’t as hard as you think to forget this little detail, and it will ruin your riding day when you can’t understand why your bike won’t start.

9. Install the filter onto its frame, and install the assembly into the air box. With your finger, put a small dab of grease over the hole that the filter retainer bolt goes through, to prevent dirt from being sucked through here. Install and tighten the filter retainer. Check all the way around the filter to ensure that it is in place and seated properly.

10. With a clean rag, remove any grease that you may have gotten on the inside of the air box, to prevent dirt build-up.

11. Now, re-install the seat or air box cover. The filter should be allowed at least one hour to dry before riding, so that the solvents in the oil can evaporate, changing the filter oil into a very sticky residue that will do an excellent job of trapping dirt. Riding on a freshly oiled filter usually makes your bike run raspy and rough, because the engine is burning the solvent vapors that are evaporating from the filter oil.

Even if your filter doesn’t get dirty, or you don’t go riding for some reason, filter oil begins to lose its ability to trap dirt effectively after about a week. If it has been longer than a week since you oiled the filter, it needs to be re-oiled, even if it doesn’t need cleaning.

Go ride, and enjoy the knowledge that your engine is breathing the cleanest air that you can give it!

:crazy: :eek: :lol: AMEN BROTHER

  • MX RIDER 778

Posted May 28, 2009 - 06:43 PM

#13

well if you use mineral spirits or other solvents how do you dispose them? THANK YOU ALL FOR THE INFO

  • manson3161

Posted May 28, 2009 - 07:31 PM

#14

chokey has it all down

  • manson3161

Posted May 28, 2009 - 07:33 PM

#15

well if you use mineral spirits or other solvents how do you dispose them? THANK YOU ALL FOR THE INFO


chokey has it all down :crazy:

  • xrmarty

Posted May 28, 2009 - 09:01 PM

#16

Kerosene, mineral spirits, ect are nice but where do you dispose them?!!!! It's an additional headache.

I'll use anything that is biodegradable. This way I can just dump in on the lawn in the backyard. I've been dumping my NO-Toil water in the same spot for the last 2 years and the grass is still nice and green:)

  • fmxfrk22

Posted May 28, 2009 - 09:06 PM

#17

there is nothing like oxy clean its really amazing and it only takes like 5 min

  • xrmarty

Posted May 28, 2009 - 09:12 PM

#18

there is nothing like oxy clean its really amazing and it only takes like 5 min


+1 If I'm not mistaken the NO-Toil cleaner is "oxy" based

  • fmxfrk22

Posted May 28, 2009 - 09:17 PM

#19

dont know about that all i know is stuff works and fast i have never seen a filter so clean its cheap use it for laundry too and it works fast no waiting no one likes to wait

  • Stu2

Posted May 29, 2009 - 02:57 AM

#20

I have been using gasoline for years and have never had a problem, any one else have issues with it...?





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