Front brake problems



23 replies to this topic
  • Mark_Cantrell

Posted September 04, 2002 - 02:53 AM

#21

Mike,

I'm sorry. My head must be buried up my ass. OK, I'll quit on the rotor theory.

The problem could still be a lot of air in the system. A large pocket of air will absorb the extra volume from the master cylinder without generating hardly any pressure. So pulling the lever wouldn't budge the pads, leading to pointless pumping on the lever.

Low fluid in the reservoir will cause this also.

If the cylinders at the pads leaked, you would see fluid below the brake.

The other problem that could cause this is a problem at the master cylinder. They are easy to rebuild and cheap to replace.

Again, sorry I missed your point. I must have had the same problem as when you run into what you watch, even if you're trying to avoid it.

Good luck,
mwc

  • MN_Kevin

Posted September 04, 2002 - 04:30 AM

#22

I found that when my master cyclinder was air bound, I would NEVER acheive any pressure at all in my system. This is when I swapped to the stainless steel line.

After trying the "in through the top method", I used Clark's (aka the ORIGINAL CARB GURU! :D ) method of PUMPING the fluid in from the bottom at the caliper.

This is especially easy w/ a new, empty brake line. Also, DO NOT have the caliper installed on the bike due to the loop seal created by Yamaha's routing of the brake line.

I also used the bottom fill method on my Honda 750 Nighthawk from the get-go, when I installed a new SS brakeline on the front.

This worked FLAWLESSLY. I still did the normal bleeding method on BOTH the master cyclinder and at the wheel cyclinder at the caliper, AFTER the initial fill.

I re-bled them again after a couple of days of use.

I cannot believe how tight my Nighhawk's brakes are. :)

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  • MN_Kevin

Posted September 04, 2002 - 04:31 AM

#23

I found that when my master cylinder was air bound, I would NEVER acheive any pressure at all in my system. This is when I swapped to the stainless steel line.

After trying the "in through the top method", I used Clark's (aka the ORIGINAL CARB GURU! :D ) method of PUMPING the fluid in from the bottom at the caliper.

This is especially easy w/ a new, empty brake line. Also, DO NOT have the caliper installed on the bike due to the loop seal created by Yamaha's routing of the brake line.

I also used the bottom fill method on my Honda 750 Nighthawk from the get-go, when I installed a new SS brakeline on the front.

This worked FLAWLESSLY. I still did the normal bleeding method on BOTH the master cylinder and at the wheel cylinder at the caliper, AFTER the initial fill.

I re-bled them again after a couple of days of use.

I cannot believe how tight my Nighhawk's brakes are. :)

[ September 04, 2002, 07:33 AM: Message edited by: NH Kevin ]

  • BigDesto

Posted September 04, 2002 - 05:09 AM

#24

Just wondering, are the brake pads NEW?, also how is the disc?(thickness). Sounds like worn pads or disc thined out.




 
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