Jump to content

  • Follow us:

  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Instagram
  • RSS Feed
  • Google+





Photo
- - - - -

ANOTHER Stripped oil drain plug


  • Please sign in to reply

12 replies to this topic
  • pablo83

    TT Silver Member

723 posts
Location: Colorado

Posted April 09, 2009 - 08:04 PM


I have an '01 WR426. The previous owner stripped out the oil drain plug and retapped the hole for a 14mm plug. I stripped out the 14mm plug :thumbsup:

After seeing all the other discussions about stripped plugs I decided I wanted steel threads. Many people suggested a heli-coil. The problem with a heli coil is there is a slot cut into the threads to allow the sump to drain:
Posted Image

Inserting a coil will block the slot. Oil could weep thru the coil threads, but it would trap any metal shavings in the sump.

So I wanted a sleeve with a hole drilled in the side to allow the sump to fully drain. I would have used a Time-Sert, but the special tap they use would not go deep enough into the drain hole. I would have used another commercial insert, but I could not find one in M12x1.5 and I wanted to go back to the stock plug.

So here's my solution:

1) split the cases :confused: I know this is a lot of work and it's not entirely neccisary, but I wanted to make sure i got all the shavings out.

2) Tap out the drain hole to 16mm

3) Get a 16mm bolt and drill and tap the center to M12x1.5
Posted Image

4) Grind the head of the bolt flat for a good seal with the new drain plug
Posted Image

5) Use a dremmel to increase the size of the recess around the hole so the 16mm bolt head will sit flush
Posted Image

6) Permanently secure the 16mm bolt in place with locktite red.

7) Drill a hole in the side of the bolt so the sump can drain. If you did not split the cases you would have to drill this hole before you inserted the bolt.
Posted Image

8) Start putting the bike back together
Posted Image

  • kskyles

    TT Gold Member

1,297 posts
Location: Arizona

Posted April 10, 2009 - 09:09 AM


that is some fine work. i'm truly impressed.

have you gotten the bike back together yet? Any leaks?

  • pablo83

    TT Silver Member

723 posts
Location: Colorado

Posted April 10, 2009 - 10:02 AM


that is some fine work. i'm truly impressed.

have you gotten the bike back together yet? Any leaks?


Thanks. I've still got new lock washers and gaskets on the way. Hopefully she'll be running by early next week.

  • C-P

    TT Titanium Member

2,001 posts
Location: Minnesota

Posted April 10, 2009 - 06:42 PM


Nice work, the same problem just prompted me to finally buy a new bike!

  • pablo83

    TT Silver Member

723 posts
Location: Colorado

Posted June 06, 2009 - 06:09 PM


Well, after a few months of use the new plug is working great. Initially it was leaking a bit and when I checked it, it was only hand tight. I'm not sure if it had loosened itself up or if I forgot to tighten it all the way. I put some locktite blue on it and haven't had any leaks since

  • pablo83

    TT Silver Member

723 posts
Location: Colorado

Posted September 06, 2009 - 07:20 PM


I've done a number of oil changes now with this solution in place. It turns out locktite red is not strong enough. On two occations the new sleeve backed out dispite having alot of locktite red on it. I finally used some JB weld and it's solid now.

Also, I do not have to use locktite blue on the drain bolt any more, I must not have fully tightened it the first time.

  • Flooder305

    TT Bronze Member

101 posts
Location: California

Posted September 10, 2009 - 12:17 PM


Nice write-up and follow up, I'm trying to figure out the stripped drain plug as well... Just wondering how big a deal having the slot in the insert is... By the looks of yours, it does seem like it could make a difference. Everyone seems to lean towards Timesert, but you say the tap wouldn't go in far enough? Is that because you were going to use a Big-sert instead of the regular size insert, due to it being oversized? Lastly, in theory, if you split the cases, couldn't you drill in to the side of the Timesert sleeve just like you did with your bolt? Good stuff, good stuff.

  • pablo83

    TT Silver Member

723 posts
Location: Colorado

Posted September 10, 2009 - 12:48 PM


Everyone seems to lean towards Timesert, but you say the tap wouldn't go in far enough? [COLOR="Red"]see below[/COLOR]

Lastly, couldn't you drill in to the side of the Timesert sleeve just like you did with your bolt? [COLOR="red"]yes, it should be no problem unless those time-serts are highly hardened, which I doubt.[/COLOR]


I went to a local machine shop to check out his time sert setup before I ordered one for myself. He had a fancy combo drill bit and tap in one so I assumed that's the way they came. Looking at the kits online I see that's not the case. A kit like this should work fine:
Posted Image

The only advantage a bolt would give you is the head of the bolt creates a nice flange. You can see my bolt did not go in exactly straight. This did not matter because I used the sleeve-bolt head as a flange to seal the drain-bolt against. But if you drill your time-sert hole in straight, this would not be an issue.

More on sump drainage latter...

  • pablo83

    TT Silver Member

723 posts
Location: Colorado

Posted September 10, 2009 - 01:08 PM


Just wondering how big a deal having the slot in the insert is... By the looks of yours, it does seem like it could make a difference.


You can see the slot allows the sump to drain entirely. If I had not drilled the hole in the side then oil would remain in the sump area between the red lines during an oil change. This is a very small volume of oil, but it's where any metal shavings would accumulate. If shavings don't drain out here then they will be forced through your sump pump and oil pump before reaching the oil filter. Plenty of people have used heli-coils (which block the slot) and not reported any problems so it might not be a big deal.

Posted Image

If I had to do this over again I would use a bolt again, but I would not split the cases. Once the bolt is in place you can mark where it needs to be drilled, remove the bolt, drill it, and replace it. If the time-sert can be removed you could use that procedure as well.

Let us know how it turns out.

  • Flooder305

    TT Bronze Member

101 posts
Location: California

Posted October 06, 2009 - 02:09 PM


Well I got my repair done today by a machine shop in Clovis. It was a better price than the dealer was asking, and he was well versed in thread repair. Anyhow he completed it on the bike, and told me it took close to an hour... But I've got a torqueable bolt now, so I'm very pleased. The only issue was using the shorter sleeve that comes in that 12x1.5 size. The default sleeve is too long and won't let the threads bite into the case at the end, which is how the Timesert gets it's grip.

  • Matt Goddard

    TT Member

47 posts
Location: California

Posted December 11, 2016 - 04:48 PM


Hey I have similar issue, but the bolt is stripped not the hole. How do you recommend I get it out

  • DRZ04

    TT Silver Member

951 posts
Location: California

Posted December 11, 2016 - 11:16 PM


What you did was good work. Less work would be a "Time Cert" -  http://www.timesert.com/    or a "Keensert"  -  http://www.repaireng...m/keensert.html

Check your local parts shop but the best deal is to go on line to McMaster Carr as they have both & are usually easy to get. If you use caution and grease you don't have to split the case. The grease should trap & hold the metal caused from the drilling and counter boring. Both of these can be used where you are removing & installing the bolt often. Heli-Coil should not be used where the fastener is removed & reinstalled often.



  • DRZ04

    TT Silver Member

951 posts
Location: California

Posted December 11, 2016 - 11:23 PM


Hey I have similar issue, but the bolt is stripped not the hole. How do you recommend I get it out

If pulling on it while unthreading won't work I would find & drill the absolute center of the plug. increase the drill size until you can almost see the threads then go at it with an awl or a scribe to pull the remaining threads out. They should look like a spring. Again using grease chase the threads with the proper tap. It is time consuming and tedious but it can save some time and money to split the case.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.