Xt350 Vs Xt225


10 replies to this topic
  • 650ryder

Posted March 06, 2009 - 11:29 PM

#1

OK so the Yamaha riders must Like the KLR I just got another offer to trade + cash for my KLR. He has an '89 XT350 with a new top end thst has been over bored, I can't remember how much though. I have done a lot of googling on the XT350 and the information is limited. From what I gather it is a good bike and has a solid reputation. MY concerns are, the age and the fact it is kick start only, as I get older electric start is becoming my friend. I also read somewhere that it has a dual carb set-up, that to me is a definate minus, I like a single carb set-up on a single thumper.

I am leaning toward the XT225, as I have seen there are many more aftermarket options than with the XT350. The added displacement of the 350is nice but with the age of the bike, is it really going to be that much of a difference over the XT225. I think with the exhaust i have checked into , rejetting the carb, and the gearing change the 225 should be close in range to the 350, but I could be wrong. I will also have cash to get an aftermaket exhaust, rear sprocket, and re jet the carb the 350 so again that should give more power.

I am not at all familiar with Yamahas:excuseme: so those of you who are your input would be realy appreciated. One other thing to consider is that I have seen some killer SM xt225's and am thinking hard about making the 225 a SM if I decide to get it.

****The over bore on the top end was .040 with a Wiesco piston, the heads were re-worked and the jug not replaced but bored out. Does any one know what that changes the displacement to?****

Thanks,

Mark

  • Wabbit16

Posted March 07, 2009 - 12:36 AM

#2

Dual carbs on the ol' thumpers aren't really an issue. Only thing that's a PITA is when ya have to remove it. As for starting, my 550 starts easily. All it takes is technique, and once you master it, it's a piece of cake. Regarding the displacement, you could calculate it. A stock XT350 is 86 x 59.6 (bore x stroke). 3.14 x 43^2 * 59.6 gives you a displacement of 346.02CC's. 0.40 is 1mm overbore so that would make it 3.14 x 44^2 * 59.6 = 362.31CC's. Anyone please correct me if I'm mistaken

  • 650ryder

Posted March 07, 2009 - 01:02 AM

#3

Dual carbs on the ol' thumpers aren't really an issue. Only thing that's a PITA is when ya have to remove it. As for starting, my 550 starts easily. All it takes is technique, and once you master it, it's a piece of cake. Regarding the displacement, you could calculate it. A stock XT350 is 86 x 59.6 (bore x stroke). 3.14 x 43^2 * 59.6 gives you a displacement of 346.02CC's. 0.40 is 1mm overbore so that would make it 3.14 x 44^2 * 59.6 = 362.31CC's. Anyone please correct me if I'm mistaken


Thanks for the info on the displacement, as for starting the big thumpers, I have a XR600r that I can usually get it to fire within 1-2 kicks. So the kick start doesn't really bother me, I am just getting lazy, the KLR electric start is so easy to fire cold or warm, one push of the button and it is ready for action.

I really like the bigger displacement bikes and the 350 is really closer to what I am looking for size wise, but a well cared for newer bike is really a great enticement. I talked to the guy who has the XT225 and I am going to take it on about a 20 mil round trip on one of our local two lane Highways. If I can get it to maintain 60-65 without feeling like I am running it to death I just may go with that one. I usually only run 65-70 on my KLR on the freeways anyway so its not like I am going to be missing out on speed that I just don't use much. When I want to go really fast I usually take the XR600 and really get on it. With al the performance mods on that bike it is a very fast bike, really too fast:busted: , but very, very fun!

Mark

  • Wabbit16

Posted March 07, 2009 - 02:57 AM

#4

Glad I could help. The XT350's are very reliable engines, but the XT225 would be easier to work on, since it's a locknut type of valve adjustment and there's no worrying about shims and buckets. All in all it goes about what floats your boat (bike). Mylast electric start bike I had was a little 100cc 2T quad. After that, my KX125 and XT550 were both kick only. But on those cold mornings, a magic button would be wonderful...

The XT350 would be better on the highway IMHO but the 225 could be made more streetworthy with different carbs, gearing, etc. Good luck. Wabbit

  • GlennF

Posted March 08, 2009 - 06:55 AM

#5

I currently own a XT225 and owned a 1985 XT350 years ago. The 350 will have a top speed 10 mph more (mine would do 85) and much more torque and power. It also is about 50 lbs. heavier. Both bikes have mediocre brakes and suspension (compared to newer designs). The 350 was an easy starter. The 225 has the E start, but requires you run the float bowl in the carb dry before shutting down if you are not going to ride for a few weeks. It's part of the bikes character. The 225 is physically smaller (like 90% of full size) and for me at 6' 215# is a little too compact for agressive off-roading. I have a 2006 DRZ250, which has much better brakes and suspension, that I have dual sported for the off-road useage.

As others have said, both bikes are stone reliable, with a nod to the 225 for ease of maintainance. There are some cheap mods that will perk up the 225.

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  • 650ryder

Posted March 08, 2009 - 06:32 PM

#6

I decided to pass on the XT225, I got a chance to sit on and ride it yesterday. I hate to say it, but it was like sitting on a toy. I had no idea how small of a bike it is. I guess I am used to riding the big thumpers and the 225 just felt so underpowered. I knew from just the 15 miles I did on it that there was no way I was going to be able to ride it the way I am used to riding. I would need to have enough room to put my son or daughter on the back for those rides when we go camping, this bike is just way too small.

I am going to look at the XT350 this week but I have a feeling that it is going to be the same thing, but I will wait and see.

I am beginning to think that I would be better off getting a DR650, it is lighter than the KLR but has the power and size to go anywhere I want to go. I am also strongly considering the DR400, it has much power and is big enough to ride two up, but is small enough to quickly load up and go, and for me it is water cooled a big plus here in the Central Valley.

Thanks for your input, but I think I am not wanting to go as small as I first thought.

Mark

  • YZEtc

Posted March 09, 2009 - 06:04 AM

#7

Hi.
I've owned both the XT-350 and XT-225.

I also read somewhere that it has a dual carb set-up, that to me is a definate minus, I like a single carb set-up on a single thumper.

I read this sometime, too, and all I have to say about it is that every Yamaha thumper with the YDIS (dual-carbs) I've owned (three of them) worked fine with no trouble.
My guess is the trouble starts when they get messed with.
A classic scenario is a bike being brought back into use after sitting for years, the carbs having to be taken apart, and ever since that point the bike won't run right.

I am leaning toward the XT225, as I have seen there are many more aftermarket options than with the XT350. The added displacement of the 350is nice but with the age of the bike, is it really going to be that much of a difference over the XT225.
I think with the exhaust i have checked into , rejetting the carb, and the gearing change the 225 should be close in range to the 350, but I could be wrong. I will also have cash to get an aftermaket exhaust, rear sprocket, and re jet the carb the 350 so again that should give more power.


Actually, the XT-225 has the older engine design of the two:
The XT-225 is based on the 1981 SR-185 street thumper, and the XT-350 engine is from the 1983 XT-250 that was first sold in Japan, which was brought into the USA in 1984.
The next year (1985), it was made into the XT-350.

If you were to ride the two bikes back-to-back, the XT-350 would feel like it has twice the power of the XT-225.
Simply more power and torque at all RPM.
Of course, the XT-225 is smaller and lighter, but not 50 lbs. lighter - more like 28 pounds (238lbs vs. 265lbs, if I recall).

Basically, to me, I really liked both bikes, and it comes down to the classic case of power vs. size and weight.
If you want a small and manoverable trail bike that's also street legal, go with the XT-225.
It will never be a rocket ship, but it gets you where you want to go quickly enough.
If you want a full-sized dual-purpose bike, the XT-350 is a good compromise because it's got more power without a massive increase in weight.
It's 265lb dry weight is actually one of the lightest Japanese dual-purpose bikes made, past or present.

:p

  • GlennF

Posted March 09, 2009 - 06:41 AM

#8

For information only:The 265 lbs. dry weight was for the TT350 which was off road only. I owned one of those also, and the XT350 felt much heavier that the TT350. As you have found out, the 225 is a very small bike physically. The XT350 is a normal size bike.

  • YZEtc

Posted March 09, 2009 - 06:55 AM

#9

Nah, I don't think the XT-350 is that heavy.
I didn't weigh mine, myself, but the claimed 265lbs. felt accurate.

I know about the TT-350 from a close riding buddy back in the day who rode with me for many miles on one.

  • maim

Posted March 09, 2009 - 06:25 PM

#10

there are upgrade parts for the xt350 out there. you just need to find them. there is a whole thread in the vintage section with a list of parts for the xt350. i have had a xt225 and there is no comparison in the power. i am currently adding more power to my xt350. i do know that with the clutch slipping it was pulling a power wheelie without trying.

  • pd350

Posted January 20, 2011 - 10:45 AM

#11

I know this is an old thread , but here's some pertinent info :
General information
Model: Yamaha XT 350
Year: 1986
Category: Enduro / offroad
Rating: 78.7 out of 100. Show full rating and compare with other bikes
Engine and transmission
Displacement: 346.00 ccm (21.11 cubic inches)
Engine type: Single cylinder, four-stroke
Power: 27.00 HP (19.7 kW)) @ 8000 RPM
Top speed: 135.0 km/h (83.9 mph)
Compression: 9.0:1
Bore x stroke: 86.0 x 59.6 mm (3.4 x 2.3 inches)
Valves per cylinder: 4
Fuel control: DOHC
Cooling system: Air
Gearbox: 6-speed
Transmission type,
final drive: Chain
Chassis, suspension, brakes and wheels
Front tyre dimensions: 3.00-21
Rear tyre dimensions: 110/80-18
Front brakes: Single disc
Rear brakes: Expanding brake
Physical measures and capacities
Weight incl. oil, gas, etc: 150.0 kg (330.7 pounds)
Fuel capacity: 12.00 litres (3.17 gallons)




 
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