what's the deal Sparky?



10 replies to this topic
  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted December 03, 2000 - 02:04 PM

#1

Man, I thought I'd never ask this question but I am having a time with my spark plug trying to remove it. I don't remember which one of these sockets came with my bike. The plug is so far down in the bowels of the top end I can't even tell what size socket to try IF one will even fit!
I checked the archives here and the bikes service manual only to find out there is no reference as to socket size or what the "special tool" that came with the bike looks like.
I guess when a guy can't change a spark plug it time to hang up the wrenches for good.

Dave

  • Boit

Posted December 03, 2000 - 02:44 PM

#2

I'm at work at the moment so I can't check what socket size is required. However, you should already have bought a replacement plug so why don't you see what size socket it requires. Changing the plug is not the easiest chore to accomplish but ti's not all THAT difficult. I use two short extensions, a pair of long needle nosed pliers, and a piece of carb vent tubing to make this go quicker. Also, I think it's a very good idea to blow compressed air through the weep hole on the side of the cylinder head after you've removed the plug lead. You'll be amazed how dirty it is in there and if you don't blow that crap out, think of the junk that falls inside the chamber when you remove the plug. Once you've got the plug completely threaded out, and if you don't have one of those deep sockets with the rubber insert that grabs the top of the plug, you can reach it with the needle nose pliers and gently lift it out of the hole. I slip on a short piece of tubing on the new plug and gently lower it into position. Using the tubing to start threading the plug keeps from stripping out the head. Once you get a turn or so going on the plug, slip the socket into place, add an extension(or two) and then your ratchet. Or you can use the Yamaha supplied socket tool. I can do it faster and feel more confident of not stripping the head by using my method. Whatever works for you.

  • Bill

Posted December 03, 2000 - 04:41 PM

#3

I use a 15 or is it a 17MM spark plug socket and an extension that is radiused so it allows for an "angular" approach to the plug. When putting it back it, since the socket/plug is allowed to "swing" while lowering into the barrel. It lines right up and starts, no problem.

I would go check the socket size, but it snowed all day here in North Carolina. What a trip????

Bill

------------------
86TT225, 98CR80, 99WR, WR timing, throttle stop trimmed, air box lid removed, White Bros head pipe, silencer and air filter. Odometer and headlight removed. Moose hand and mud guards. YZ stock tank and IMS seat. Renthal Jimmy Button "highs" and Renthal Soft half waffle grips. AMA, SETRA.

  • Boit

Posted December 03, 2000 - 10:12 PM

#4

Bill: When you put the new plug into the barrel, how do you initially lower it into place? The recess is so deep that you can't hold the plug with your fingers and get it all the way down. That's why I use the tubing. Once I have the plug threads started, I can just yank the tubing off and tighten it normally. I use the CR8EK plug and want to avoid smacking the electrodes on the head and closing the gap that I just carefully set. Maybe I'm doing this the hard way... :)

  • Bill

Posted December 04, 2000 - 03:46 AM

#5

The "spark plug" type sockets have a peice of rubber tubing built into the socket...... You know it might be a 5/8" plug socket? I just slide the plug into the socket, snap it on to the end of my wobbly extention and lower it. The "wobble" extention allows the plug to dangle at a right angle to the heads surface and the plug threads right up.

I think the key is the extention. It's one of those cheapo alternatives to a "universal". It's long eoung I can use a rachet to remove the plug. Takes not ime at all!

I'll check the plug size tonight when I get home.

Bill

------------------
86TT225, 98CR80, 99WR, WR timing, throttle stop trimmed, air box lid removed, White Bros head pipe, silencer and air filter. Odometer and headlight removed. Moose hand and mud guards. YZ stock tank and IMS seat. Renthal Jimmy Button "highs" and Renthal Soft half waffle grips. AMA, SETRA.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Hick

Posted December 04, 2000 - 07:45 AM

#6

I think it IS a 5/8” because I use a spark plug socket in this size with a built-in swivel and a short extension (easier than fallin’ off a log), although I imagine its possible I’ve been using a 5/8 on a 15 mm hex this whole time…

Like Bill I just stick the plug in the rubber insert in the socket which is sufficient to hold the plug while it is lowered into the head.

  • Boit

Posted December 04, 2000 - 10:51 PM

#7

Yeah, I have those spark plug sockets with the rubber inserts. For some reason, it won't hold the plug tight enough and when I start to lower it inside, the plug slips out. Maybe I haven't been pushing the plug hard enough to get a good grip? That's why I started using tubing to hold it.

  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted December 07, 2000 - 11:14 AM

#8

Here's the skinny on what I found.
First I have a replacement N-D plug only to find out that ND takes a different size socket. This is why I was having trouble I was trying to fit the wrong size socket to fit a NGK plug, And yes you guys are right. The NGK is a 5/8" socket.

I found the ticket is a 'spark plug type' 5/8' socket coupled with a universal and an extention to the ratchet is the winning combination I was looking for. I didn't expect ND and NGK to require different sized sockets. (sigh) I feel better about getting out my wrenches now.
The whole reason I wanted to remove the plug was to squirt some oil in the top end to lubricate it before I kicked it over. It seems I've been niglecting my WR this year. I hadn't started it since July and I didn't have the heart to "dry kick" it.
Thanks for those responses

  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted December 07, 2000 - 11:21 AM

#9

Oh yea, for those that are having trouble with retreving the loose plug down in the 'black hole', what I used was a magnet thingy we all have in the tool box. The kind that is like a pen and has a strong but very small round magnet on the end. I have 2 types. One telescopes and is very strong, the other just folds. I think it is a "Snap On" brand. Great little gizmos for those dropped nuts and bolts. (magnetic that is)

(I couldn't find my rubber tubing for turning and lifting plugs that I usually use.)

  • Boit

Posted December 07, 2000 - 12:39 PM

#10

I used one of those telescoping pen type magnets to lift the buckets off the shims when adjusting my valves. However, the one I orginally had was barely strong enough to lift the buckets off....had to keep trying until the bucket would lose the oil suction. I took a chance and bought a Craftsman. This thing is about 5 times as strong magnetically!...plus, it comes with a shield around the magnet so that it won't try to attract things on the side.....only directly below the magnet. Way cool!

  • Bill

Posted December 07, 2000 - 12:57 PM

#11

I told ya, once you get the angle of the dangle correct it's a breeze.

Later
Bill

------------------
86TT225, 98CR80, 99WR, WR timing, throttle stop trimmed, air box lid removed, White Bros head pipe, silencer and air filter. Odometer and headlight removed. Moose hand and mud guards. YZ stock tank and IMS seat. Renthal Jimmy Button "highs" and Renthal Soft half waffle grips. AMA, SETRA.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.