can you run diesel in a 98 400f?


33 replies to this topic
  • live4speed

Posted February 04, 2009 - 01:31 PM

#21

diesel doesnt combust the same way gas does...there is no spark...it might burn for a bit, but your engine is going to cripple

  • wakin

Posted February 04, 2009 - 01:34 PM

#22

Running helium in your Front tire makes it easier to wheelie.


Just sayin...

  • jayh300

Posted February 04, 2009 - 01:58 PM

#23

So, just for the sake of knowing...at what temperature will diesel ignite, and what's the minimum compression ratio would it take to get the air that hot? Let's assume seal level and 70 degrees F.


this is off the winkapedia web site.... sounds pretty violent
In the diesel engine, only air is introduced into the combustion chamber. The air is then compressed with a compression ratio typically between 15 and 22 resulting into a 40 bar (about 600 psi) pressure compared to 14 bar (about 200 psi) in the gasoline engine. This high compression heats the air to 550 °C (about 1000 °F). At this moment, fuel is injected directly into the compressed air. The fuel is ignited by the heat, causing a rapid expansion of gases that drive the piston downward, supplying power to the crankshaft.[8]

As well as the high level of compression allowing combustion to take place without a separate ignition system, a high compression ratio greatly increases the engine's efficiency. Increasing the compression ratio in a spark-ignition engine where fuel and air are mixed before entry to the cylinder is limited by the need to prevent damaging pre-ignition. Since only air is compressed in a diesel engine, and fuel is not introduced into the cylinder until shortly before top dead center (TDC), premature detonation is not an issue and compression ratios are much higher.

  • grayracer513

Posted February 04, 2009 - 02:59 PM

#24

true... it has had me dreaming of a 1 cyl duramax style injector nozzle/pump assy that could be run off the timing chain and an exhaust particulate filter/silencer that could produce 450 degrees of exhaust to roast you buddies number plates off......

I assume we all know that the military has Diesel KLR 650's, right?:

http://en.wikipedia....ologies_M1030M1

Interestingly, exhaust heat drops as compression ratio rises. Gasoline exhaust is generally somewhat hotter.

Diesel fuel in an atomized state, as when sprayed by an injector, is significantly more volatile, flammable, and subject to ignition, even at atmospheric pressure, than gasoline is.

  • Wiz636

Posted February 04, 2009 - 03:17 PM

#25

I assume we all know that the military has Diesel KLR 650's, right?:

http://en.wikipedia....ologies_M1030M1


I bet those are pretty light...

  • jayh300

Posted February 04, 2009 - 03:19 PM

#26

the new dmax's go in to a regeneration mode where the pcm basically heats the exhaust up to clean the soot out of it. the bulletin basically says the temps out the tip are hot enough to catch paper, leaves, etc on fire. If you look at the tip it is way different, pulls air from the back side thru the end of the pipe to make a suction as you go down the road...
I would want mine on a switch so you could melt bumper covers off tailgators.
It is supposed to do that on average of once per tank..

  • DRX350

Posted February 04, 2009 - 03:20 PM

#27

I've ran Diesel in my generator a couple of times. It doesn't run well, but it does run. It smokes like crazy due to the oil in the fuel and fouls a plug fairly soon.

I wouldn't run diesel in a modern engine if you like the bike.

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  • jayh300

Posted February 04, 2009 - 03:31 PM

#28

Caution: Tailpipe outlet exhaust temperature will be greater than 300°C (572°F) during service regeneration. To help prevent personal injury or property damage from fire or burns, perform the following:

Do not connect any shop exhaust removal hoses to the vehicle's tailpipe.
Park the vehicle outdoors and keep people, other vehicles, and combustible material away during service regeneration.
Do not leave the vehicle unattended.

shhhhh.... this came off the gm website

  • grayracer513

Posted February 04, 2009 - 03:50 PM

#29

I bet those are pretty light...

Oh, you bet they are.

the new dmax's go in to a regeneration mode where the pcm basically heats the exhaust up to clean the soot out of it. the bulletin basically says the temps out the tip are hot enough to catch paper, leaves, etc on fire. If you look at the tip it is way different, pulls air from the back side thru the end of the pipe to make a suction as you go down the road...
I would want mine on a switch so you could melt bumper covers off tailgators.
It is supposed to do that on average of once per tank..

We used to rig switches on the exhaust gas recycling valves of the old 5.7 and 6.2/6.5L Chevy diesels. Flip them on at full throttle and you had a full-on smoke screen. :lol:

The newer 6.9L Chevys/GMC's have an exhaust scrubber something like that that can be removed and cleaned out. It's said to remove over 95% of the soot. :)

  • yz400fsmasher

Posted February 04, 2009 - 05:41 PM

#30

ever hear about people making "foolers" what it duz is when u flip a switch inside the cab it makes it were your turbo makes no boost and it richens the air fuel mixture and thats when u smoke the guy out that is tail gatin you and covers his windshield in soot. got one on my 6 cyl. cummins

  • cowboyona426

Posted February 05, 2009 - 08:03 AM

#31

the new dmax's go in to a regeneration mode where the pcm basically heats the exhaust up to clean the soot out of it. the bulletin basically says the temps out the tip are hot enough to catch paper, leaves, etc on fire. If you look at the tip it is way different, pulls air from the back side thru the end of the pipe to make a suction as you go down the road...
I would want mine on a switch so you could melt bumper covers off tailgators.
It is supposed to do that on average of once per tank..

News flash... all the new diesels have DPF and regen... EPA requirements.
Back to the topic... don't forget that diesel fuel is injected under fairly high pressure also. I can't recall what it is in my Powerstroke, but the newer Dodge with the commonrail Cummins motor injects fuel at like 20k psi.

  • jayh300

Posted February 05, 2009 - 08:10 AM

#32

News flash... all the new diesels have DPF and regen... EPA requirements.
Back to the topic... don't forget that diesel fuel is injected under fairly high pressure also. I can't recall what it is in my Powerstroke, but the newer Dodge with the commonrail Cummins motor injects fuel at like 20k psi.


good point... stuck in a gm dealership you forget that. sorry
the dmax is 20k also...

  • linustitus

Posted February 05, 2009 - 08:21 AM

#33

I've ran Diesel in my generator a couple of times. It doesn't run well, but it does run. It smokes like crazy due to the oil in the fuel and fouls a plug fairly soon.

I wouldn't run diesel in a modern engine if you like the bike.


I don't commonly post in this forum but this topic caught my eye. I had a friend that had a 10hp Briggs & Stratton he converted to run on diesel just to see if it would work. He modified the gaskets to increase compression and had two fuel lines that came together before entering the carb, then got the engine up to full operating temp on regular gas and then he opened the diesel fuel line and shut off the gas and it ran. He said it didn't sound pretty and didn't climb in the RPMs too well but it worked and was able to move the go-kart frame he installed it on.

But of course I have no proof so I don't blame you if you don't believe me.

  • grayracer513

Posted February 05, 2009 - 09:08 AM

#34

OK, look. There are two major problems with diesel as a fuel for spark ignition 4-strokes. The first is that the greater viscosity of the fuel compared to gas makes it very difficult to atomize and meter through conventional jets. The second is, as I said once already, the extremely low octane number of diesel fuel, which is generally around 40-45. You would in fact have less trouble running it in a lower compression engine than in a higher CR unit. The ignition timing would also need to be retarded somewhat.

Since the thread has got to the point that it's repeating itself, I think we're done with it.

Thanks for calling in. :)





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