shock does not return when I push down on the seat


24 replies to this topic
  • bluebreadtruck

Posted January 13, 2009 - 03:05 PM

#1

I had my rear shock rebuilt and installed a new heavyer spring. Now, when i sit on the bike it goes down slow, but sticks down and i have to get off the bike and pull the back up to get it to return. Is it just too cold, or is there something that may be wrong?

  • SJMC_DON

Posted January 13, 2009 - 04:38 PM

#2

That's usually an indicator of bad shock linkage bearings.

  • dazzabb

Posted January 13, 2009 - 05:25 PM

#3

Check the rebound damping screw on the bottom of the shock has not been screwed all the way in. This will cause same problem as you describe.

Just turn it back counter clockwise and see if it improves.

  • KJ790

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:02 PM

#4

You didn't grease your linkage bearings did you?

  • zared

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:04 PM

#5

that has NOTHING to do with linkage bearings, its your nitrogen.

  • KJ790

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:06 PM

#6

that has NOTHING to do with linkage bearings, its your nitrogen.


Not when there is a spring on it...

  • zared

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:13 PM

#7

what are you talking about not when there is a spring on it?

  • SJMC_DON

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:18 PM

#8

that has NOTHING to do with linkage bearings, its your nitrogen.


It's the first indicator that your linkage is seizing.... the fact that the shock was just rebuilt is suspect but as KJ said, the spring alone supports the weight of the bike and should return to a static sag position regardless of the absence of nitrogen... Evem if the rebound clicker was turned all the way in, the bike should still raise on it's own.

Either the rebound valving is completely plugged or the linkage is seizing... I don't know a whole lot, (infact nothing), about shock rebuilding but I have had more than one Yamaha do exactly as bluebreadtruck's has and it's always been linkage.

  • zared

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:22 PM

#9

Uhm actually sir you are wrong there, if no nitrogen is present the Bike will not return, it will do as exactly as he says, I've rebuilt many rear shocks, and with no nitro present and with fluid present you can push the shock in, but have to pull it out, that is exactly what the nitrogen is used for...............it might return somewhat but it wont operate normally

  • Beejay

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:23 PM

#10

There is a possibility of a few things, hard to pinpoint without checking first but I'd check those bearings.

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  • justanotherider

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:28 PM

#11

I've raced in -35 degrees. I'd say it's pretty darned unlikely to be temperature related. I have seen a shock seal blow in extremely cold weather; but never seen a shock fail to return due to cold.

justanotherider

Posted Image

  • SJMC_DON

Posted January 13, 2009 - 06:39 PM

#12

and with no nitro present and with fluid present you can push the shock in, but have to pull it out, that is exactly what the nitrogen is used for...............


With the spring on it? And I really don't want to argue (cause arguing on the internet is like the Special Olympics, even if you win you are still retarded)... but there is a direct link (pun intended) to linkage seizing up and this symptom of the rear shock not returning, your statement that it has nothing to do with it does the OP no good :thumbsup:

My research tells me that compressed nitrogen is used to keep the oil from foaming because if the oil foams it will screw up it's ability to dampen...

I'm not second guessing you, well maybe I am, but you said you have rebuilt shocks and I have not...

  • WR_Dave

Posted January 13, 2009 - 07:15 PM

#13

:moon: When you/whomever put the shock back on the bike, a washer or something didn't go back together in the right order. and Don you are definetly the winner of the "special olympics" event that you got roped into. Think of how much weight we can save by getting rid of those pesky springs. You know, the ones that push the bike back up if the linkage isn't binding. :thumbsup: Wooo man I think I'm gonna pee !!!! :p WR Dave

  • KJ790

Posted January 13, 2009 - 07:17 PM

#14

Uhm actually sir you are wrong there, if no nitrogen is present the Bike will not return, it will do as exactly as he says, I've rebuilt many rear shocks, and with no nitro present and with fluid present you can push the shock in, but have to pull it out, that is exactly what the nitrogen is used for...............it might return somewhat but it wont operate normally


If the shock has the spring mounted on it and no nitrogen it will return. The shock is on the bike, therefore it has a spring on it. Ever put a shock on a bike with no spring, it sinks to the ground, the nitrogen pressure cannot even come close to holding up a bike, the spring holds up the bike. You can't compress the spring with your hands.

  • zared

Posted January 13, 2009 - 07:23 PM

#15

well let me say something before i further embarass myself, i wasnt even thinking of the spring being on it.....................................uhhhhh :thumbsup:

Ive read the post to quickly and realized.................


my mistake

  • bluebreadtruck

Posted January 13, 2009 - 07:26 PM

#16

lol! thanks guys!

ok, so before i spend the $$$ to ship this thing back to factory connection, how can i make sure it is nothing else?

some things to keep in mind:

The shock worked great (so i thought) untill I went and tried to add a higher rate spring and like a TOTAL dumbass unscrewed the bottom of the shock....after a huge explosion of oil/nitrogen I called factory connection for a recharge, when they got it they found that it was very worn, and I had lost a pin when I got it apart. So, they did a complete and expensive total rebuild. I have always had good luck with them, and Im more worried I may have done something wrong before i send it back to them and look like an idiot out shipping costs.

so: before the rebuild it did this exact thing once before, and it was a cold day, i rode it anyway and it loosened up, so i figured it was the temp. It dident do that again untill now.

I went ahead and cranked up the preload thinking it was too low, but its pretty damn tight now, and backed out the compression and rebound screws 5 clicks just to see.....no affect.

Basically if I sit on the bike, it compresses like it has the damping turned up wayy to high, and compresses down as i jump on it, it just wont return past say 1/2 travel unless i physically pull up on it and it comes back real slow.

I called them and they said it does not have a "break in" so to speak and that sag is normal, but i explained this isnt "sag" its staying down at 1/2 stroke or so.

SO...what should i do to verify what is really wrong?


EDIT: ok, yeah i dident grease anything..... how do i correctly grease the linkage?

  • WR_Dave

Posted January 13, 2009 - 07:28 PM

#17

Congrats Zared, good job on admitting the oversite. Some of the guys that have been here for a while have had these types of sessions with fellows of your vintage beforeso we tend to fuel the fire a bit, but I don't ever remember one who was a gracious and honest as you. Good on ya!! :thumbsup: WR Dave

  • zared

Posted January 13, 2009 - 07:31 PM

#18

sigh it was my bad, oh well what can ya do, my apologies..

  • WR_Dave

Posted January 13, 2009 - 07:31 PM

#19

Hey Bluebreadtruck, do us a favor and loosen "ONE" linkage bolt at a time ( just loose not undone ) and try the suspension after every one and let us know if you find the binding bolt. WR Dave.

  • KJ790

Posted January 13, 2009 - 08:04 PM

#20

EDIT: ok, yeah i dident grease anything..... how do i correctly grease the linkage?


If it is your linkage, you are beyond the greasing stage, you will need to replace the bearings. It can be a pain in the #$$, but you won't make that mistake again.




 
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