Steering feels loose 02YZ426


13 replies to this topic
  • rufusz

Posted December 19, 2008 - 12:33 AM

#1

Hi

I've recently replaced the steering bearings, and now it feels so loose, that when I go really slow and try to turn tight, the bike seems to "fall in" :thumbsup: Is something like this possible? Or did I get used to the old, rusty bearings and this is something new?

Thx

  • 426 NOOB

Posted December 19, 2008 - 01:23 AM

#2

Hi

I've recently replaced the steering bearings, and now it feels so loose, that when I go really slow and try to turn tight, the bike seems to "fall in" :thumbsup: Is something like this possible? Or did I get used to the old, rusty bearings and this is something new?

Thx


as long as the procedure was done correctly, than it is probably just that new bearing feel. Is the steering stem nut torqued to spec? I have also heard of people over tightening these and it makes the steering a bit harder. Or, add a steering dampener. lol

  • rufusz

Posted December 19, 2008 - 01:48 AM

#3

I don't know if it's tightened at spec. I tightened it by feeling.

  • grayracer513

Posted December 19, 2008 - 06:30 AM

#4

The ring nut that goes on the stem under the clamp is tightened to 38Nm, rotate the stem a few times (it will be stiff), then loosen the nut and retighten to 7Nm. This will seem loose, but there should be no "wiggle" in the stem bearings. When the clamp is set in place, and the crown nut is torqued down, the bearing will tighten up. The crown nut torques down to 145Nm.

You are probably correct that you are only feeling the difference in rusty and free bearings.

  • Wiz636

Posted December 19, 2008 - 08:43 AM

#5

The ring nut that goes on the stem under the clamp is tightened to 38Nm, rotate the stem a few times (it will be stiff), then loosen the nut and retighten to 7Nm. This will seem loose, but there should be no "wiggle" in the stem bearings. When the clamp is set in place, and the crown nut is torqued down, the bearing will tighten up. The crown nut torques down to 145Nm.


Aw geez Gray...are you converting us over to metric torque values now? :thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted December 19, 2008 - 08:47 AM

#6

Aw geez Gray...are you converting us over to metric torque values now? :smirk:

The OP states he is in Romania. :thumbsup:

  • Wiz636

Posted December 19, 2008 - 09:13 AM

#7

The OP states he is in Romania. :thumbsup:


Good point, I missed that.

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  • Kasjok

Posted December 19, 2008 - 09:59 AM

#8

Off topic: I have always found it to be weird calculating with inches, foots, yards and ounces, pounds, stones. SI is much more understandable and easier to calculate, for me at least. :thumbsup:

  • Wiz636

Posted December 19, 2008 - 10:16 AM

#9

Off topic: I have always found it to be weird calculating with inches, foots, yards and ounces, pounds, stones. SI is much more understandable and easier to calculate, for me at least. :thumbsup:


I actually agree with that...it seems that our system of measurement here in the states is in reality pretty retarded.

  • grayracer513

Posted December 19, 2008 - 12:25 PM

#10

I actually agree with that...it seems that our system of measurement here in the states is in reality pretty retarded.

It's the English system, not the American system, and if you think feet and pounds are retarded, you should see how they size wrenches and fastener heads. :thumbsup:

  • rufusz

Posted December 20, 2008 - 11:36 AM

#11

Thx gray, as always a clear answer :smirk:

About the Metric/English system, for me it's very strange to have everything in inches/feets/pounds/etc, to much complication for 1/4, 3/8, 13/14, simple whole numbers in mm seems great.
Didn't get the point on how "we size wrenches", pretty simple from 6mm to 36mm will be covered in a medium size toolbox. Besides that it's much simple to add whole numbers when needed to design, calculate something : 14 + 26 + 5 vs. 1/4 + 3/8 + 2 1/2. I met several people who did get used to the english system, and they add together such fractional number pretty fast, but still...

PS: I'm drunk now, so tomorrow I will probably edit the post :thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted December 20, 2008 - 06:20 PM

#12

Didn't get the point on how "we size wrenches",

That wasn't about metric, that was about the English. If you've never worked with Whitworth or British Standard wrench sizes, you've missed a trip to an alternate plane of reasoning. The people who brought you the foot and the pound have some, um, interesting ideas. Very few of the wrench jaws cross over to any size at all, either metric or U.S. The theory is that the wrench size represents the thread size of the fastener being dealt with, i.e., 3/8 BS is the wrench that fits the head of a 3/8 British Standard bolt. The jaws of a 3/8 BS wrench are somewhere in the general area of 14-15mm, but neither of those dimensions. Likewise, it is neither a 9/16" or a 5/8"; just some weird size.

To make matters worse, Whitworth and BS wrenches are all the same sizes marked differently. By that I mean that a 3/8 BS is the same size as a 5/16 Whitworth (W). When the British Standard standard was written up, it called for smaller bolt heads by one full step, along with a special fine thread for motorcycle bolts (for instance, 3/8x26tpi). The new wrenches made after that were all marked with the new sizes, even though they were the same size as before.

The only crossover size I can remember is the 1/4BS, or 3/16W, which it seems to me was about 7/16", which is nearly 11mm. But that's the only one.

Messy business, eh, mate?

  • rufusz

Posted January 07, 2009 - 05:50 AM

#13

I've met some Whitworth threaded screws, but (luckily) didn't have to work long on them. But those had metric heads, and if I know right, only the thread type is Whitworth, for wrenches there's only Metric and English.
Have to buy some good quality torque wrenches, to check the screws in the winter-overhaul time but before the ice hardens to hard, cause then it's ice-race time :thinking:

  • grayracer513

Posted January 07, 2009 - 09:36 AM

#14

I've met some Whitworth threaded screws, but (luckily) didn't have to work long on them. But those had metric heads, and if I know right, only the thread type is Whitworth, for wrenches there's only Metric and English.

Wish that was true, but it's not. There were 3 British threads; Whitworth (course), British Standard (fine), and a special motorcycle thread that I forget the name of that was extra fine to help it hold against vibrations better.

The wrench sizes are here:
  • Whitworth ... (BS).......inch .......MM
  • 3/16 W .........1/4 ......0.445 .....11.30
  • 1/4 W ..........5/16......0.525 .....13.34
  • 5/16 W..........3/8 ......0.600 .....15.24
  • 3/8 W...........7/16 .....0.710 .....18.03
  • 7/16 W..........1/2 ......0.820 .....20.83
  • 1/2 W...........9/16......0.920......23.37
  • 9/16 W..........5/8.......1.010......25.65
  • 5/8 W..........11/16.....1.100......27.94
  • 11/16 W........3/4.......1.200......30.48
  • 3/4 W............7/8.......1.300......33.02
Full table at :http://www.samstagsa...worth_table.htm





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